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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 




REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow19361940acto 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THB 



Several Official Boards 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 



1936 



ACTON JViEMORiAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



Several Official Boards 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




<I^^CT^ 



' (j^jm^^k Coll 

/) US 



For the Year Ending December 31 



1936 



Town Officers, 1936 

Moderat# 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

W. Piper Term expires 1938 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1939 

George S. Braman Term expires 1937 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1938 

Henry L. Haynes Term expires 1939 

Warren H. Jones Term expires 1937 

Collector of Taxes 

Charles A. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare (One Year) 

Carl E. Backman Bertram D. Hall 

Frank S. Braman 

Constables 

George A. Braman Charles A. Durkee 

Michael Foley Alan B. Frost 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Fred W. Green Term expires 1938 

Wendell F. Davis Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1937 

School Committee 

Samuel E. Knowlton Term expires 1938 

Lulu L. Clark Term expires 1938 

Avis Howe Term expires 1939 

Randall N. Woodworth Term expires 1939 

Louisa N. Wood Term expires 1937 

Everett N. Montague Term expires 1937 



Trustees of Memorial Library 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1938 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1937 

Board of Health 

Raymond F. Durkee Term expires 1938 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1939 

George H. Tuttle Term expires 1937 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Warren H. Jones Term expires 1938 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1939 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1937 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1938 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1939 

A. N. Hederstedt Term expires 1937 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1938 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1937 



Appointments Made by Selectmen — 1936 

Finance Committee 

Murray Brown William T. Merriam 

Alfred W. Davis ' Webster S. Blanchard 

Albert P. Durkee Howard J. Billings 

Superintendent of Streets 

A. H. Perkins 

Town Accountant 

Howard L. Jones Term expires 1938 

Registrars of Voters 

Daniel W. Sheehan Term expires 1939 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1937 

Arthur W. Lee Term expires 1938 

Horace F. Tuttle Ex-Officio 



Election Officers , 

Precinct I 
Warden — James W. Coughlin 
Clerk — ^Arthur W. Wayne 
Inspector — Arthur F. Davis 
Inspector — Harold F. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — George A. Murphy 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — S. E. Knowlton 
Deputy Inspector — Leo F. McCarthy 

Precinct II 
Warden — Theron Lowden 
Clerk— William F. Driscoll 
Inspector — Clare Milbery 
Inspector — Timothy Hennessey 
Deputy Warden — John G. Maguire 
Deputy Clerk- — Thomas Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Frank A. Merriam 
Deputy Inspector — James Brown 

Precinct III 
Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Clerk — Peter Duggan 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — James Kinsley 
Deputy Warden — Fred S. Whitcomb 
Deputy Clerk — Frank McDonald 
Deputy Inspector — Harry Holt 
Deputy Inspector — John J. Duggan 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief 
Clarence Frost, Engineer — Precinct I 
David C, Clayton, Engineer — Precinct II 
A. Hazelton Perkins, Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

William Munn 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 



Bog Officer 

Arthur Fraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Clare Milbery 

Superintendent of Town Forest 

Charles A. Durkee 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Bertram D. Hall Charles E. Smith George H. Reed 



Michael Foley 



Field Drivers 

Alan B. Frost 



George A. Braman 



Superintendent of Moth Work 
James J. Knight 



George A. Braman 

George H. Reed 
William Braman 
A. W. Davis 
F. D. Harrington 
M. B. Ferber 
Phillip Newell 



Police Officers 

Michael Foley, Chief 
Alan B. Frost 

Public Weighers 



C. A. Durkee 



Alfred Davis, Jr. 
W. H. Soar 
G. Howard Reed 
W. H. Francis Davis 
Thomas Ahern 
Fred Burke 



Daniel MacMillan 



— 7— 



Town Warrant 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 




-ei? 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said County, 
Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are 
hereby directed to notify the legal voters in said town of Acton, 
qualified to vote at town meetings for the transaction of town 
affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 

Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 

Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock, noon, Monday, the first day of March, 1937, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least before 
the first day of March. 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following town 
officers: Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of 
taxes, one selectman for three years; one assessor for three 
years, three members of the board of public welfare, one for one 
year, one for two years, and one for three years ; four constables 
for one year, one cemetery commissioner for three years, two 
members of the school committee for three years, one member of 
the board of health for three years, one trustee Memorial Library 
for three years, and a tree warden. 



— 8— 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 8 o'clock 
p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Commonwealth 
to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, as aforesaid, to 
meet at the Town Hall in said Acton, on Monday, the eighth day 
of March, at seven o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on 
the following articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and commit- 
tees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any commit- 
tees chosen at any previous meeting that have not already re- 
ported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will appro- 
priate to defray the necessary and usual expenses of the several 
departments of the town and determine how the same shall be 
raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will raise for 
the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see what action the town will take in regard 
to the collection of taxes. 



Article 7. To see what sum of money the town will raise and 
appropriate for the maintenance of f he fire department, or vote 
an5i:hing thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix a price thereon. 

Article 9. To see what action the town will take toward the 
suppression of the brown-tail and gypsy moth. 

Article 10. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to insure the employees of the town or act anything there- 
on. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the town will ap- 



— 9— 

propriate for the payment of premiums on the treasurer's and 
collector's bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1937, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as m-.ay be given for a period of less than one year in ac- 
cordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse, and appropriate a sum of money for the mainten- 
ance of same. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, 
the town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, and 
repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General 
Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto or 
take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,300 or any other sum for the suppression of brown- 
tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of |1,200 or any other sum for the care of shade trees or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to establish a Road 
Machinery Account, to which shall be credited all receipts re- 
ceived for the use or rental of road machinery, the proceeds to 
be appropriated as voted by the town for road machinery pur- 
poses, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to appropriate to es- 
tablish a Road Machinery Fund for the purpose of purchasing, 
repairing and operating road machinery. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, from 
the Carhsle line to the State Road in East Acton ; said money to 
be used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted by 



—10— 

the State or County, or both, for this purpose ; or take any other 
action in relation thereto. 

Article 20. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for W.P.A. work or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see what action the town will take to pur- 
chase and install a fire whistle, or other fire signal device for use 
at the West Acton Fire house or act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of 1550.00 or any other sum to purchase new fire hose. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $200 for the use of the treasurer, to pay the 
expenses of the local dog oflftcer. The town will be reimbursed 
for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 24. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
for insurance on the High School Building. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the relocation and reconstruction of 
High Street at the Powder Mill bridge ; said money to be used in 
conjunction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County, or both, for this purpose ; or take any other action in 
relation thereto. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of financing the con- 
struction of a consolidated elementary school in the vicinity of 
Kelley's Corner and authorize and direct the selectmen to ac- 
cept on behalf of the town an offer of the tJnited States of 
America to aid in financing the construction of said project by 
making a grant of money to the town ; and authorize a building 
committee to construct said project and contract with respect 
thereto; and authorize the treasurer, with the approval of the 
selectmen, to borrow such sums as may be necessary to meet any 
appropriation made; or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 27. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $200.00 or any other sum of purchase new forest fire 
hose. 



—11— 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting at- 
tested copies thereof seven days at least before the time of said 
meeting as directed by vote of the town. Hereof fail not and 
make due return of this v^arrant with your doings thereon to 
the town, clerk at or before the time of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this twenty-seventh day of 
January, 1937. 

GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 
RALPH W. PIPER, 
JAMES E. KINSLEY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



A true copy. Attest : MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Constable of Acton. 



—12— 



Report of Finance Committee 



Your Committee on Finance respectfully submits the follow- 
ing recommendations for the ensuing year. 

Roads, General Maintenance $12,000.00 

Schools 46,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,500.00 

Memorial Library, Current Expenses .... 900.00 

Memorial Library, Books 200.00 

Hydrant Service 3,128.00 

General Government 5,500.00 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500.00 

Cemeteries 800.00 

Military Aid 200.00 

State Aid . 500.00 

Soldiers Relief 1,200.00 

Police Department 2,500.00 

Board of Health 1,000.00 

Public Welfare 6,500.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 600.00 

Old Age Assistance 9,000.00 

Snow Removal, Estimate 1,000.00 

Care of Shade Trees — Article 16 500.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Bonds, High School and Fire Trucks .... 5,500.00 

Interest on Bonds 1,000.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 1,500.00 

Memorial Day 275.00 

Fire Department . 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Forest Fires, New Hose — Article 24 200.00 

Gypsy Moth Work— Article 9-15 1,000.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.00 

Treasurer's and Collector's Bonds 250.00 

Public Health Nurse 2,200.00 

County Hospital Assessment 694.18 

Fire Department, New Hose — Article 24. 250.00 

Expenses of Dog Officer— Article 23 200.00 



—13— 

W. P. A. Projects Expenses— Article 20. . 5,000.00 
Reconstruction High St. Powder Mill 

Bridge— Article 25 1,000.00 

Machinery Appropriation 300.00 

Insurance High School Building, 5 Years 1,425.22 



$122,022.40 



Article 17-18. Recommend establishing a Road Machinery 
Account and to appropriate the sium of $300.00 to establish this 
Fund. 

Article 21. Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,500.00 
from Overlay Surplus to purchase and install Fire Whistle at 
West Acton. 

Article 24. Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,425.22 
for insurance on High School Building for the term of Five 
years. 

Article 26. We believe the Town should first vote on the 
question of policy involved by this article. 

If the vote favors the building of a school we believe a com- 
mittee should be appointed to consider carefully the financial 
requirements of the project. 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,000.00 from Overlay 
Surplus for Reserve Fund. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Precinct 1 — Murray Brown, Albert P. Durkee 
Precinct 2 — Howard J. Billings, William T. Merriam 
Precinct 3 — ^Webster Blanchard, Alfred W. Davis 



■14- 



Selectmen's Report 



We submit herewith the reports of the various departments 
of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1936, after the 
actions under the different articles voted at the last Annual 
Town Meeting and Special Town Meetings. 

Owing to the flood damage which occurred in March after 
our Annual Town Meeting we were obliged to use quite a sum 
of our road money refilling washouts. 

After the Board had attended a meeting at Cambridge with 
the County Commissioners and the Public Works Engineers we 
expected to be allotted funds to rebuild the two bridges lost; 
one on Parker Street and the other on River Street. After quite 
a long wait the Public Works notified us they had no funds. As 
there was a W. P. A. Project in progress widening and improv- 
ing this street the Board decided to rebuild this bridge which 
was done at a cost of approximately $1,600.00. The road bed 
has been raised several feet where it was washed out; and this 
should take care of any future floods. 

Finally in September we were allotted a Federal Flood Pro- 
ject to rebuild the bridge washed out on River Street. The 
Town's share to be 1/24 of the cost to be paid next year. The 
Board recommends an appropriation to take care of the expens- 
es of the W. P. A. or the C. W. A. Projects. 

The County Engineers with the approval of the officials of 
the Powder Mills recommends straightening the curve and put- 
ting in a large pipe at the foot of High Street near the Powder 
Mill bridge to take care of any future floods, there were two 
bad wash outs at this place during the March flood; about 100 
feet in length and at a depth of 8 feet in some places. This has 
been laid out by the Engineers and should be done this coming 
year. 

We recommend the reconstruction of Main Street, ''Lowell 
Road," from Carhsle line to State Road. 

We find the Town at the close of the year in very good finan- 



—15— 

cial standin;g, and we wish to thank the different officers and 
committees of the Town for doing their part in keeping within 
their appropriations in carrying out their work in the different 
departments of the Town. 

GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 
RALPH W. PIPER, 
JAMES E. KINSLEY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



January 27, 1937 

The Board of Public Welfare submits the following report 
for the year 1936. 

During the year, |5,830.84 was expended in aiding thirty- 
seven fam:ilies representing one hundred and three persons 
under direct control of this Board. Of this amount, the Town 
of Acton will be reimbursed approximately $1,200.00 for seven 
cases having settlements in other cities or towns. Seven fami- 
lies representing tweni^y-three persons having Acton settlef- 
ment vv^ere aided in other, cities or towns to a cost of $1,566.60. 
This makes a total of forty-four families representing one hun- 
dred and twenty-six persons that were aided during the year. 

There has been a slow but steady improvement in walfare 
conditions during the past year. Not only has there been a 
decrease in the number of cases aided, but there has been a 
material decrease in the length of time this aid was needed. 

Due to this and confident that this improvement will con- 
tinue, this Board feels that a substantial reduction can be made 
in the appropriation for welfare this coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 
FRANK S. BRAMAN, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



—16— 

Old Age Assistance Report 

January 27, 1937 

We started the year 1936 with nineteen Old Age Assistance 
cases. On December 31, 1936 there were fifty-one persons re- 
ceiving this assistance. 

This increase in the number of cases is due to the changes 
made in the Old Age Assistance Laws as mentioned in my report 
of last year, mainly, the reduction of the age limit from seven- 
ty years to sixty-five. 

Although this will necessitate an increase in the amount that 
must be appropriated for Old Age Assistance the eventual, di- 
rect cost, to the Town will be considerably less on above number 
of cases. This is due to the Federal Government's participation 
in the cost which will be fifty per-cent of the total amount ex- 
pended not exceeding thirty dollars per month per case. Also, 
the State's contribution is two-thirds of the balance instead of 
one-third on settled cases. The cost to the Town will be one- 
sixth of total amount expended. 

This year, up to the present date, there has been added seven 
new cases and there are several pending. 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Suprvisor, 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance. 



WPA Sewing Project 

January 27, 1937 

There has been some comment made during the past year as 
to the need or advisability of continuing the above project. 

During the past year this project has given continuous em- 
ployment to an average of about fourteen women with a total 
payroll for the year of, $8,794.99. This project is rated very 
high at the State headquarters of the WPA, especially as to the 
quality of the work turned out. 

Approximately 4,500 articles, (clothing and food) were dis- 
tributed to about 150 families in Acton during the past year. 

The cost to the Town was about |700.00, which is a small per- 
centage of the total value coming in to the Town. 

This Board feels that this project is worthwhile and recom- 
mend that an appropriation be made for the coming year. 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare (Sponsor) . 



-17— 



Town Meetings 

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 9, 1936 

Art. 1. To choose all necessary Town officers and commit- 
tees and fix salaries of all Town officers. 

Chose Waldo E. Whitcomb, Trustee of Elizabeth White Fund 
for three years. 

Chose Charlotte Conant Trustee of the Goodnow Fund for 
three years. 

Chose Clarence Frost Trustee of the Acton Firemen's Relief 
Fund for three years. 

Chose H. Stuart McGregor Trustee of the West Acton Fire- 
men's Relief Fund for three years. 

Voted : To fix the salary of the tax collector at three quarters 
of one per cent of the amount collected and to allow an addi- 
tional charge for expense of postage incurred in the collection 
of taxes. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Selectmen be 
two hundred dollars per annum and the other members, one hun- 
dred dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen dollars 
for the annual meeting and ten dollars for other meetings. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board of Pub- 
lic Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars per annum 
and the other members seventy-five dollars each per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Accountant be four hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hundred 
dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Assessors be nine hundred dol- 
lars in the aggregate per annum to* be apportioned as they may 
determine the said sum to include any salary of a clerk. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be instructed to fix the salaries 
of all other town officers. 



—18— 

Art. 2. To see if the town will accept the several reports of 

town officers. 

Voted: To accept the reports of the several town officers. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the report of any committees 
chosen at any previous meeting who have not already reported. 

No action taken under this article. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will appropriate 
to defray the necessary and usual expenses of the several de- 
partments of the town and determine how the same shall be 
raised. 

Under this article and other articles in the warrant it was 
voted to appropriate and raise by taxation for : 

Roads, general maintenance S 12,000.00 

Schools 46,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,000.00 

Memorial Library, current expenses 800.00 

Memorial Library, books 200.00 

Hydrant Service . 3,079.00 

General Government 5,500.00 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500.00 

Cemeteries 800.00 

Military Aid 200.00 

State Aid • . . . . 500.00 

Soldiers' Rehef 1,500.00 

Police Department 2,500.00 

Board of Health . 1,000.00 

Public Welfare 8,500.00 

Old Age Assistance 9,000.00 

Snow Removal 4,700.00 

Care of Shade Trees 500.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Bonds, High School 4,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 1,000.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 2,000.00 

Memorial Day 275.00 

Fire Department • 2,800.00 

Forest Fires • 500.00 



—19— 

Forest Fires, new hose. Art. 24 . . , 200,00 

Gypsy Moth Work ....'. 1,700.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.00 

Treasurer's and Collector's Bonds 250.00 

Public Health Nurse 2,200.00 

County Hospital Assessment 656.03 

Memorial Library Heating* Plant 1,125.00 

New Fire Equipment. Art. 22 . . 2,000.00 

Fire Department, new hose. Art. 24 550.00 

Expenses of dog officer 200.0Q 

Voted : To appropriate from the overlay surplus 

for a Reserve Fund .... ... . 1,500.00 

Voted : To appropriate from the Cemetery Land 

Fund for the care of Cemeteries 300.00 

Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will raise for 
the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
and seventy-five dollars, to be expended under the direction of 
a committee consisting of the commander of the Isaac Davis 
Post, G. A. R., the commander of the American Legion, and the 
commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Art. 6. To see what action the town will take in regard to 

the Collection of taxes. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 7. To see what sum of money the town will raise and 
appropriate for the maintenance of the Fire Department or vote 

anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-eight 

hundred dollars. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix the price thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate five hundred dollars for fighting 
brush fires and that the price for labor be fixed at fifty cents per 
hour for firemen and sixty cents per hour for the Forest Warden 
and Deputy Forest Warden. 



—20— 

Art. 9. To see what action the town will take toward the sup- 
pression of the brown tail and gypsy moth. 

Voted: To appropriate seventeen hundred (1700) dollars — 
the same to include the purchase of spraying equipment. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
to insure the employees of the town or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the town will appro- 
priate for the payment of premiums on the treasurer's and col- 
lector's bonds or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of two hundred and fifty 
(250) dollars. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be- 
ginning January 1, 1936, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as ms^y 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of th^ financial year 
beginning January 1, 1936, and to issue a note or notes therefor 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse. 

Voted: To employ a public health nurse to be under the di- 
rection of the Board of Health. 

Voted: To appropriate twenty -two hundred dollars for the 
salary and maintenance of said nurse. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, the 



—21— 

town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair 
of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General 
Laws and Acts in amendment thereof, and in addition thereto or 
take any action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To appropriate |656.03 for said County Hospital as- 
sessment. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of 11,125.00 to install a new heating plant and repair the ceiling 
in the Memorial Library or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of |1, 125.00 to 
install a new heating plant and repair the ceiling in the Me- 
morial Library and that the work be done by a local contractor 
under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of 11,700.00 or any other sum for the suppression of brown 
tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Action taken under Article 9. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of one thousand dollars or any other sum for the care of 
shade trees or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of five hundred dollars. 

Art. 18. Shall the provisions of Chapter 139 of the General 
Laws pertaining to burnt and dangerous buildings be accepted. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $5,000.00 to reconstruct Parker Street, starting at the 
Concord street end or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 20. To see what action the town will take to ade- 
quately and efficiently heat the South Acton Fire House. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 



Art. 21. To see what action the town will take to purchase 
and install a fire whistle or other fire signal devise for use at the 
West Acton Fire House or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To postpone action under the article. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to purchase two ne^v 
fire trucks for Precincts 2 and 3 or act anything thereon. 

Voted: Unanimously that there be appropriated the sum 
of eight thousand dollars (8,000) for the purchase of two fire 
trucks for use in Precinct 2 and 3 and to meet the said appro- 
priation there be raised in the tax levy of 1936 the sum of two 
thousand dollars and that the treasurer with the approval of the 
selectmen be authorized to borrow the sum of six thousand 
(6,000) dollars, and to issue notes therefor payable in accord- 
ance with Chapter 44, General Laws ; so that the whole loan shall 
be paid in not more than four years; that the purchase of said 
trucks be left to the board of Selectmen' and the Fire Engineers 
of the town, also that the Selectmen be authorized to dispose 
of any unnecessary equipment. 

Article 23. To see what sum of money the town will raise 
and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire department or 
act anything thereon. 

Action taken under Art. 7. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $550.00 or any other sum to purchase new fire hose. 

Voted: To appropriate |750.00, two hundred dollars of said 
sum to be used to purchase hose for the Forest Fire service. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to elect a Board of Pub- 
lic Welfare to serve for three years, the term of one member to 
expire each year, or act anything theron. 

Voted: That at the next annual election the three members 
of the Board of Public Welfore be chosen, one for one year; one 
for two years and one for three years, and thereafter one annual- 
ly for the term of three years. It was voted that the candidate 
nominated from Precinct 1 be chosen for one year, the candidate 
nominated from Precinct 2, be chosen for two years, and the 
candidate nominated from Precinct 3 be chosen for three years. 



—23— 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to discontinue as a 
lie way, the road known as Woodlawn Lane from its intersection 
with Taylor Road near the residence of William S. Dunn to its 
intersection with Concord Road near Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 27, To see if the town will vote to discontinue as a pub- 
lic way, the road known as Forest Road from its intersection 
With Woodlawn Lane to a point five hundred feet distant from 
its intersection with Hosmer Street near the residence of Samuel 
E. Knowlton. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

' Art, 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of two hundred dollars for the use of the treasurer to 
pay the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be re- 
im^bursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or 
act anything- thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate S200.00 for the use of the treasurer 
to pay the expenses of the local dog officer. 



Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
lectmen to sell, after first giving notice of the time and place of 
sale by posting such notice of sale in some convenient and public 
place in the town fourteen days at least before the sale, property 
taken by the town under tax title procedure provided that the 
selectmen or whomsoever they ma}^ authorize to hold such public 
auction may reject any bid which they deem inadequate, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted: To authorize the selectmen to sell property taken by 
the town under tax title procedure in accordance with the terms 
and conditions mentioned in Article 29. 



Proceedings of a Special Town Meeting Held, August 17. 



JL.I. 



Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to accepte from Sarah A. 
Watson, of Somerville, Mass., conveyance to the town of the 
woodlot adjoining Woodlawn Cemetery in the Town of Acton, as 



—24— 

described in a conveyance by Julian Tuttle to Georgia E. Whit- 
ney and the said Sarah A. Watson, by deed dated June 30, 1919, 
duly recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, the same 
forever to be used as an addition to said Woodlawn Cemetery 
for cemetery purposes and purposes incidental thereto and in 
connection therewith, and subject to the express condition set 
forth in her offer to said town, dated June 1, 1938, or in any 
way act thereon. 

^ Voted: Unanimously that the town of Acton accept from 
Sarah A. Watson, of Somerviile, Mass., the conveyance to the 
town of the wood lot adjoining Woodlawn Cemetery in the town 
of Acton as described in a conveyance from Julian Tuttle to 
Georgia E. Whitney and the said Sarah A. Watson, by deed 
dated June 30, 1919, duly recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds, the same to be forever used and maintained by the 
town of Acton as an addition to said Woodlawn Cemetery for 
cemetery purposes and purposes incidental thereto, and in con- 
nectfon therewith in accordance with the offer made to this town 
by the said Sarah A. Watson dated June 1, 1936, which offer is 
hereby accepted subject to the condition therein set forth. 

Art. 2. To see if the tov/n will vote to accept the terms and 
provisions made for the benefit of the tow^n by Clause C of the 
twenty-sixth item of the will of Georgia E. Whitney, and, es- 
pecially to arrange for the location of the mortuary chapel as 
provided in said Clause C, upon the woodlot adjoining said cem- 
etery to be conveyed to the town by Sarah A. Watson as a gift 
to the town, and to accept the balance, if any, of the fund created 
by said Clause C as a trust fund and to apply the net income and 
interest arising therefrom to the general care, upkeep and beau- 
tification of said cemetery, or in any way act thereon. 

Voted : Unanimously, that the town accept the terms and pro- 
visions miade for the benefit of this town by Clause C of the 
twenty-sixth item of the will of Georgia E. Whitney, late of 
Somerviile, Mass., deceased, as allowed by the Probate Court for 
the County of Middlesex, and that the mortuary chapel as there- 
in provided be erected and located upon the wood lot to be con- 
veyed to this town by Sarah A. Watson, pursuant to the vote 
passed under the first article of this warrant, adjacent to the 
Woodlawn Cemetery in the town, and to accept the balance, if 
any, of the fund created by said Clause C after said chapel has 



^25— 

been erected, as a trust fund and to apply the net income and 
interest arising therefrom to the general care, upkeep and beau- 
tification of said cemetery as in said will provided. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to authorize and in- 
struct the Board of Cemetery Commissioners to represent the 
town of Acton in all matters concerning the conveyance of the 
woodlot adjoining the Woodlawn Cemetery as a gift to the Town 
from Sarah A. Watson, of Somerville, Mass., the construction of 
the mortuary chapel on said lot as provided by Clause C of the 
twenty-sixth item of the will of Georgia E. Whitney, late of 
Somerville, Mass., deceased, with full authority to approve the 
exact location of said chapel, plans and specifications therefor, 
the architectural development of said lot in connection with such 
chapel and all other matters to carry out the acceptance of said 
gifts, or in any way act thereon. 

Voted: To authorize and instruct the Board of Cemetery 
Commissioners of this town to represent the town of Acton in 
all matters concerning the conveyance of the wood lot adjacent 
to the Woodlawn Cemetery as a gift to the town by Sarah A. 
Watson, of Somerville, Mass., to approve and accept the deed of 
conveyance to the town, to approve the construction of the 
mortuary chapel thereon by the Trustees under the will of said 
Georgia E. Whitney as provided by said Clause C of the twenty- 
sixth item of the will of said Georgia E. Whitney, with full au- 
thority to approve the exact location of such chapel, the plans 
and specifications therefor, to accept said chapel, when erected, 
in the name and behalf of this town, to approve architectual 
development of said lot in connection with said chapel and said 
Woodlawn Cemetery and to do any and all other matters which 
they may deem necessary or advisable to carry out the accept- 
ance of said gifts, the construction of said chapel, the general 
care, upkeep and beautification of said cemetery. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to accept the gift of ten 
thousand (10,000) dollars made to the inhabitants of the town 
of Acton by Clause K of the twenty-sixth item of the will of 
Georgia E. Whitney, late of Somerville, Mass., deceased, the 
same to be kept safely invested and the income and interest 
arising therefrom to be devoted by the Selectmen of said town 



—26— 

to the relief of worthy poor of South Acton, all as set forth in 
said Clause K, or in any way act thereon. 

Voted: Unanimously to accept from the Trustees under the 
will of Georgia -E. Whitney, late of Somerville, Mass., deceased, 
as approved and allowed by the Probate Court for the County of 
Middlesex, the gift of ten thousand (10,000) dollars made to the 
Inhabitants of the town of Acton by Clause K of the twenty- 
sixth item of said will, as follows : 

**K. Unto the said Inhabitants of the town of Acton the 
sum of ten thousand (10,000) dollars, the same to be kept 
safely invested and the income and interest arising there- 
from to be devoted by the Selectmen of said town to the 
relief of the worthy poor of said South Acton, preferably 
elderly people, such distribution to be made unostentatious- 
ly to the end that the names of those benefited thereby shall 
not be published" 
and also any and all other sum^s of money which may accrue to 
the town by virtue of Clause P of said twenty-sixth item of the 
will, all the same to be kept safely invested as a trust fund and 
the income and interest arising therefrom to be devoted by the 
Selectmen of this town to the relief of worthy poor of South 
Acton, preferably elderly people, ail as set forth in said Clauses 
K and P of said will. 

Voted : That the town of Acton place on record their appre- 
ciation and thanks for the generous gifts under the will of the 
late Mrs. Georgia E. Whitney, and to her sister, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Watson, of Harvard, for the rare public spirit in providing ben- 
efits to the town and its citizens. Also to recognize the unselfish 
interest shown by Mrs. Watson and her sister for the welfare of 
their native town for many years past, and the provisions for 
the future. 

Art. 5. To see if the town v/ill authorize the Selectmen to 
accept a 4.7 field gun. World War, from the War Department, 
and to pay, from the reserve fund, or other funds, at the discre- 
tion of the Selectmen, a sum not to exceed S200.00 for shipping 
and mounting purposes, it being a condition of the gift that no 
expense shall accrue against the Unitel States in the shipment 
of this field piece. 



—27— 

Voted: That the Selectmen be, and herebj'- are directed to 
apply for and accept from the War Department of the United 
States, one 4.7-inch field piece, now available at Rock Island 
Arsenal ; and that the expenses of obtaining and setting up the 
field piece be taken from any available funds now in the pos- 
session of the town, the cost of the whole not to exceed S200.00. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
?2,350.00 (twenty-three hundred and fifty dollars) for W. P. A. 
work or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of |2,350.00 be appropriated for W. P. 
A. work, and to meet said appropriation the sum of S2,350.00 be 
transferred from available funds in the treasury. 



Proceedings of a Special Town Meeting Held October 21, 1936 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to rescind the action 
taken at the special town meeting held August 17, 1936, where- 
by under Article 5, to see if the town ^will authorize the Select- 
men to accept a 4.7 field gun. World War, from the War Depart- 
ment, and to pay, from the reserve fund, or other funds, at the 
discretion of the Selectmen, a sum not to exceed |200.00 for 
shipping and mounting purposes, it being a condition of the gift 
that no expense shall accrue against the United States in the 
shipment of this field piece. It was "Voted that the Selectmen 
be and hereby are directed to apply for and accept from the 
War Department of the United States, one 4.7 field piece, now 
available at Rock Island Arsenal; and that the expenses of ob- 
taining and setting up the field piece be taken from any available 
funds now in the possession of the town, the cost of the whole 
not to exceed |200.00." 

Voted : To lay Article 1 on the table indefinitely. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a commit- 
tee to select the location for the gun voted at the Special To^'^m 
Meeting, August 17th, 1936, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That this meetinjg acting as a committee of the 
whole, go on record as voting to place the gun on the right hand 
side of the World War Monument properly mounted. 



-28— 



Voted: To adjourn. 



Art. 3. To see whether the town will vote to remove all ob- 
jects, monuments, and other impedimenta, from the Town Com- 
mon, except the Battle Monument erected in 1851 to Davis, Hos- 
mer and Hayward, and the action at the North Bridge ; and from 
this time forth reserve that part of Acton Common as the sole 
site for the Battle Monument or do or act thereon. 

Art. 3. No action taken. 



—29- 



RECORD OF PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
Held November 3, 1936 



S. L. P Socialist Labor Party 

C. P Communist Party 

P Prohibition 

R. Republican 

U. P The Union Party 

D Democratic 

S. P ... Socialist Party 

Whole number of ballots cast 

Electors of President and Vice-President: 

Aiken and Feichert, S. L. P. 
Browder and Ford, C. P. . . 
Colvin and Watson, P. ... 

Landon and Knox R 

Lemke and O'Brien, U. P. . 
Roosevelt and Garner, D. . 
Thomas and Nelson, S. P. 
Blanks 



GOVERNOR, 

Fred G. Bushoid, Union-Coughlin 

Townsend 

Alfred H. Evans, P 

John W. Haigis, R 

Horace I. Hillis, S. L. P 

Otis Archer Hood, C. P 

Charles F. Hurley, D 

Alfred Baker Lewis, S. P 

William H. McMasters, U. P 

Blanks 

LIEUT. GOVERNOR 

Henning A. Blomen, S. L. P 

Freeman W. Follett, P 

Walter S. Hutchins, S. P. ...... 

Francis E. Kelly, D 

Lever ett Salton stall, R 

Paul C. Wicks, C. P 

Blanks 



Pet. 1 

402 


Pet. 2 
533 


Pet. 3 

499 


Total 
1434 


LQent . 

None 


None 


1 


1 


None 


1 


None 


1 


None 


1 


1 


2 


313 


362 


357 


1032 


16 


24 


10 


50 


70 


131 


123 


324 


None 


None 


None 


None 


3 


14 


7 


25 


Pet. 1 


Pet. 2 


Pet. 3 


Total 


None 


1 


None 


1 


None 


1 


1 


2 


320 


381 


372 


1073 


None 


1 


None 


1 


None 


None 


None 


None 


65 


117 


115 


297 


None 


None 


None 


None 


8 


21 


5 


34 


9 


11 


6 


26 


Pet. 1 
None 


Pet. 2 

2 


Pet. 3 

None 


Total 
2 


None 


1 


1 


2 


None 


1 


None 


1 


66 


124 


109 


299 


328 


386 


379 


1093 


None 


None 


None 


None 


8 


19 


10 


37 



—30— 



SECRETARY Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Frederic W. Cook, R 333 407 )382 1122 

Ralph Dow, S. P. . . . None 1 None 1 

George L. McGlynn,.S. L. P 1 2 None 3 

Mary E. Moore, C. P. 1 None None 1 

Joseph Santosuosso, D 48 104 90 242 

Blanks 19 19 27 65 

TREASURER Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pct. 3 Total 

Thomas Gilmartin, S. L. P. ...'.. None 1 None 1 

Mabeiie M. Graves, P , None 112 

Harold J. Hatfield, Ind. Prog, ... 2 3 1 6 

Eva Hoffman, C. P None 1 None 1 

James M. Hurley, D 54 118 97 269 

William E. Hurley, R 329 389 385 1103 

Sylvester J. McBride, S. P None None None None 

Blanks :..... 17 20 15 52 

AUDITOR Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pct. 3 Total 

Lyman M. Aldrich, P 1 1 1 3 

Thomas H. Buckley, D 52 119 103 274 

Richard Darby, Independent .... 3 1 None 4 

Elizabeth Donovan, S. P None None None None 

Alfred Haase, C. P None None None None 

Walter J. Hogan, S. L. P None 4 2 6 

Russell A. Wood, R 328 382 371 1081 

Blanks 18 25 22 65 

ATTORNEY GENERAL Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pct. 3 Total 

Morris Berzon, S. P None 1 None 1 

Paul A. Dever D 65 139 125 329 

Felix Forte, R 317 365 354 1036 

George F. Hogan, P 2 1 None 3 

Fred E. Oelcher, S. L. P None 2 None 2 

Michael Tuysuzian, C. P None None None None 

Blanks 18 25 20 63 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pct. 3 Total 

Alonzo B. Cook, Townsendite P. . . 1 2 2 5 

Albert Sprague Coolidge, S. P. . . None None None None 

James M. Curley, D 51 96 76 223 

Ernest L. Dodge, S. L. P None None 3 3 

Charles Flaherty, C. P None 1 None 1 



-31— 



''Guy M. Gray, Townsend-S. J. . . . 2 1 

Moses H. Gulesian, Townsend . . . 2 2 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., R 328 382 

Wilbur D. Moon, P ' 2 1- 

Thomas- C. O'Brien, U. P. ..... : 9 31 

Blanks 7 ^ 17 

CONGRESSMAN— FIFTH DIST. Pet. 1 Pet. 2 

Daniel J. Coughlin, D 54 99 

John T. Kevin, Jr. Independent . . 3 9 

Edith Nourse Rogers, R 329 406 

Blanks :\. 16 19 

. COIIMCILLOR.__THIIlD DIST. Pet. 1 Pet. 2 

Frank A. Brooks, R. ^ 327 375 

Marvin W. Brown, Townsend Plan 5 12 

hy E. Carroll, D 50 107 

.fc, 20 39 

■ SENATOR— FIFTH BfiDDLESEX DIST. Pet.. 1 Pet. 2 

P. Gerard Cahill, D. . . . .^ 57 123 

George G. Moyse, R. 327 380 

Blanks . 18 30 

REFRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT Pet. 1 Pet. 2 

John H. Valentine, R. ..:... . . . . 342 427 

Blanks V 60 106 

REGISTER OF PROBATE _ Pet. 1 Pet. 2 

Francis E. Burke, D. 54 110 

Loring P. Jordan, R 317 380 

Eileen O'Connor Lane, S. P. . . . . 1 1 

Blanks 30 42 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Pet. 1 Pet. 2 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch, R 265 311 

Robert Butler, S. P None 2 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick, D 50 102 

Angelo Massiello, S. P None None 

Edward A. Rose, D 37 67 

Walter C. Wardwell, R 269 327 

John A. Sweeney None None 

Blanks 183 257 



None" 


o 
o 


2 


6 


382 


1092 


4 


7 


13 


53 


17 


41 


Pet. 3 


Total 


77 


230 


4 


16 


397 


1132 


21 


56 


Pet. 3 


Total 


372 


1074 


9 


26 


87 


244 


31 


90 


Pet. 3 


Total 


104 


284 


363 


1070 


32 


80 


Pet. 3 


Total 


410 


1179 


89 


255 


Pet. 3 


Total 


99 


263 


367 


1064 


2 


4 


31 


103 


Pet. 3 


Total 


314 


890 


2 


4 


85 


237 


3 


3 


60 


164 


298 


894 


3 




233 


673 



—32- 



COUNTY TREASURER Pct. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Mary Eubanks, S. P None 2 2 4 

Charles E. Hatfield, R 323 384 368 1075 

Thomas F. Mackey, D 53 112 91 256 

Blanks 26 35 38 99 

CLERK OF COURTS Pct. 1 Pct. 2 Pct. 3 Total 

Edward L. Ford, D 55 113 97 265 

John R. MacKinnon, R. 324 387 371 1082 

V. Philip Torigian, S. P None 325 

Blanks . 23 30 29 82 

Question 1 : Whiskey, rum, gin 
and all other alcoholic beverages 

Yes 145 183 161 489 

No 186 239 254 679 

Blanks 71 111 84 266 

Question 2: Wines and beer, ale, 
and all other malt beverages 

Yes 183 223 231 637 

No 148 199 205 552 

Blanks 71 111 63 245 

Question 3: All alcoholic bever- 
ages in packages 

Yes '. . . . 151 209 207 567 

No 176 205 224 605 

Blanks 75 119 68 262 

The following is a schedule of the vote cast for a Representa- 
tive in the General Court from the 11th Middlesex Representa- 
tive District November 3, 1936. 









73 














O 


(-• 


xi 








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o 


< 


M 


o 


o 


3 


H 


1179 


772 


295 


2883 


614 


996 


6739 


255 


258 


47 


645 


154 


485 


1844 



John H. Valentine of 

Chelmsford 1179 

Blanks 

1434 1030 342 3528 768 1481 8583 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, Town Clerk, Acton 
ALBERT J. BERRY, Town Clerk, Bedford 
RUTH C. WILKINS, Town Clerk, Carlisle 
HAROLD C. PETERSON, Town Clerk, Chelmsford 
WILLIAM C. BROWN, Town Clerk, Littleton 
CHARLES L. HILDRETH, Town Clerk, Westford 



-oo — 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 



Whole number recorded 46 

Born in Acton 11 Native parentage 81 

Males 20 Foreign parentage 2 

Females 26 Mixed parentage 13 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 33 

Residents of Acton .... 41 Residents of other places 25 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 37 

Residents of Acton .... 34 Residents of other places 3 

Occurring in Acton 24 Occurring in other places 10 

Average Age in Years, 64 — 



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—39— 

Deaths Reg^istered in 1936 



No. Date Name 

1. Apr. 11 Anderson, Hans 

2. Dec. 25 Batcheider, Carroll W. 

3. Dec. 23 Beach, Albert R. 

4. May 11 Blanchard, Charlotte S. 

5. Feb. 10 Blanchard, Juliet 

6. Dec. 16 Buckley, Helen 

7. May 2 Callan, Patrick J. 

8. Mar. 3 Christie, Ida Ellen (Dearborn) 

9. Jan. 3 Christoiferson, Jacqueline 

10. Nov. 3 Corbett, Robert S, 

11. Aug. 14 Cram, Clarence David 

12. Feb. 1 Downie, Lloyd Walton 

13. July 25 Eldridge, Frank S. 

14. Oct. 15 Green, Catherine Maude 

15. Nov. 28 Griffin, Maurice 

16. Mar. 17 Harris, David C. 

17. Dec. 20 Harris, Katherine M. 

18. Nov. 8 Harris, William 

19. May 12 Kuleisus, Annie 

20. Dec. 21 Kuleisus, Mary 

21. Dec. 27 Kulberg, Helen L. 

22. Oct. 3 Lawrence, Abbie F. 

23. Oct. 22 Miles, Charles H. 

24. Dec. 18 Morey, Earl Carl 

25. Apr. 1 Morse, Viola I. 

28. July 5 Newton, Theron F. 

27. Mar. 15 Oliver, Adelaide M. (Stetson) 

28. Nov. 14 Priest, Andrew Frank 

29. Mar. 22 Robbins, Freeman W. 

30. Dec. 25 Sargent, Sarah F. 

31. Feb. 20 Schofield, Delia 

32. Nov. 4 Shapley, Eugene Rockwood 

33. Oct. 14 Shugrue, Julia T. 

34. Feb. 11 Turnbull, George L. 

35. Oct. 27 TutUe, Walter Aaron 

36. July 7 Varney, John R. 

37. May 8 Wilson, Arthur B. 



?rs. 


Mos. 


Dys. 


60 


11 


5 


82 


6 


4 


56 


11 





70 


8 


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88 




25 


50 


1. 


21 


70 






80 


8 


25 

2 


65 


5 


18 


69 


1 


21 


60 


8 


8 


42 






82 


4 


25 


63 


9 


12 


84 


10 


11 


76 


10 


17 


72 




— — 


48 


9 


27 


13 


2 


11 





5 


12 


86 


1 • 


3 


84 


4 


22 


15 


1 


2 


27 


9 


24 


88 


11 


1 


84 


7 


10 


85 


11 


6 


74 




24 


78 


3 


8 


72 






80 


8 


2 


80 


8 




52 




24 


60 


4 


1 


88 


9 


20 


62 


5 


23 





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41- 



List of Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1936 



Stuart |2J 

Lpiiin, .Willard 2.00- 

I, C. E 2.00 

Hilda 5.00 

Mrs. Lee 2.00 

Frank . 2.00 

Bancroft, Clesson A. . . 10.00 

Barry, David A. 2.00 

Bateman, Leon 2.00 

Priscilla 5.00 

, Mrs.. A. E. . . . 2.00 

Bell, George 2.00 

y Antonia ...... 2.00 

rry^ William G 4.00 

L, Alfred 2.00 

•d, Hazel G. . . . 2.00 

Bondelevitch, Walter . . 4.00 

Bowen, Robert M 4.00 

Bowman, Herbert E. . . 2.00 

Bradley, Leo 2.00 

John J 2.00 

ion, Guy 2.00 

Braman, Dorothy ..... 5.00 

Braman, Frank S ^ 4.00 

Braman, George A. . . . . 2.00 

Brasette, John 2.00 

Fred E. 4.00 

Robert 2.00 

, F. W 2.00 

William 2.00 

Caldwell, Hazel 2.00 

Caldwell, Margaret 2.00 

Carlson, Christian .... 4.00 

Carvelo, Manual . . 2.00 

Casasa, Polly 2.00 

Cary, Lester 0. ....... 5.00 

Chaffin, Nancy S 2.00 



Charles, Will A. 2.00 

Charter, William W. ... 2.00 

Christofferson, Allen M. 2.00 

Christofferson, Edwin H. 2.00 

Clapp, Harold 2.00 

Clarke, Harry W. ..... 5.00 

Clark, Lulu L 2.00 

Clark, 0. Lawrence ... 2,00 

Clouter, Joseph 2.00 

Conant, Charlotte 2.00 

Condon, Timothy ..... 2.00 

Conquest, Arthur 2.00 

Coughlin, Harold 4.00 

Coughlin, John F 2.00 

Crosby, W. C 5.00 

Cullinane, C. C 2.00 

Davis, Charles E. ..... 7.00 

Davis, Warren A. & Son 5.00 

Davis, Wendell F 7.00 

Day, Harold E. . ... . . . 2.00 

Doyle, Henry K. . . 2.00 

Drummond, Mrs. Millie E. 2.00 

Duggan, John 5.00 

Durkee, Mabel C. ...... 2.00 

Durkee, Raymond F. . . . 2.00 

Durkee, Sidney P. ..... 2.00 

Edney, Charles F 2.00 

Ennaguess, Michael . . . 2.00 

Espie, James 2.00 

Evans, John 7.00 

Fairbanks, Curtis S. . . 5.00 

Fanning, Jack Jr 2.00 

Farquhar, Stuart 2.00 

Farley, Charles J 4.00 

Farrar, James 2.00 

Farris, Charles ...... 5.00 

Ferguson, Robert C. . . . 2.00 



42— 



Finan, Bertha M '. 5.00 

Fisher, Charles W 5.00 

Flerra, Louis A 5.00 

Fletcher, John 4.00 

FHnt, Buddie 2.00 

Flint, Marjorie S 5.00 

Fobes, Marion 2.00 

ForVes, Edward L 2.00 

Fraser, Arthur 50.00 

Frazier, Robert A 2.00 

Freeman, George 2.00 

Freeman, Matthew D. . 2.00 

French, J. H 2.00 

Fullonton, Llewellyn T. 2.00 

Gagnon, Ida A 5.00 

Gallagher, Margaret . . 2.00 

Gallagher, T. C 5.00 

Gallant, Mildred 2.00 

Gallant, Minnie P. 2.00 

Garceau, Jean B 2.00 

Gatchell, Herman 4.00 

Gibbs, Mrs. Harry F. . . 5.00 

Godfrey, Carl R 2.00 

Goodrich, Howard .... 4.00 

Goodwin, Martin F. . . 2.03 

Goward, Hannah C. . . . 5.00 

Gowen, Elmer 2.00 

Greene, Arthur E 2.00 

Haas, Henry C 2.00 

Hart, Nelson H 2 0^ 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Harvey, W. Burton .... 4.00 

Hatch, Raymond L. . . . 2.00 

Hartwell, Russell 2.00 

Hayes, F. C 5.00 

Hayes, Michael G. 4.00 

Hodgen, Hugh 2.00 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Holland, Frank T 2.00 



Holland, Hope C 7.00 

Holland, Neville R 2.00 

Hollowell, Norman 5.00 

Hubbard, David M 2.00 

Hunt, Wilbur V 2.00 

Jalonen, Arthur 4.00 

Jenks, Albert R 2.00 

Jenney, M. P 2.00 

Jensen, Peter .• 6.00 

Johnson, Albion 2.00 

Johnson, Mary M 2.00 

Jones, Howard L 4.00 

Jones, Karl R 2.00 

Kazokas, Cypras 2.00 

Kazokas, William ..... 2.00 

Kendall, Leoni 2.00 

Kenna, Dorothy 2.00 

Keyes, Henry M 6.00 

Kilmartin, William . . . 7.00 

Kimball, Elanthan .... 2.00 

King, Benjamin 2.00 

Kingsley, Carrie F. . . . 4.00 

Knowlton, Samuel E. . . 2.00 

Laffin, Ormal S. R 5.00 

Lane, Patricia R 2.00 

LaRoche, Arthur 2.00 

Larrabee, George W. . . 5.00. 

La Tulippe, John 2.00 

Leavitt, Arnold B 2.00 

Le Clere, Edward 2.00 

Liebfried, Walter H. . . 5.00 

Liebfried, Robert 2.00 

Litchard, Lucy B 2.00 

Livermore, J. William . 2.00 

Livermore, Roland 0. . . 5 00 

Lowden, Richard 2.00 

Lowden, Bertha ...... 2.00 

Lowell, Clesson A. .... 5.00 

MacGregor, H. Stuart . 2.00 



43— 



MacKinnon, F. Roy . . . 2.00 

Maguire, John 2.00 

Mahoney, James 7.00 

Marsh, A. W 2.00 

Mason, Eleanor ....... 2.00 

Mason, Roger 2.00 

Massie, William A 2.00 

Mauro, Frank 2.00 

Maynes, Everett M. . . 2.00 

McCarthy, Leo 2.00 

Mead, Hobart E 2.00 

Mekkelsen, Henry 2.00 

Mekkelsen, Ida ....... 2.00 

Mekkelsen, Soren 2.00 

Mekkelsen, Thora ..... 2.00 

Mel, Eleanor 2.00 

Merriam, Harold 2.00 

Milberg, Clare A 2.00 

Moore, Mildred Pope . . 6.00 

'Montague, Everett N. . . 2.00 

Morse, George A 2.00 

Middleton, W. J 2.00 

Moorehouse, Mrs. C. F. 2.00 

Murgatroyd, James 2.00 

Murray, John 2.00 

Nealey, Mrs. Edward . . 2.00 

Newell, Dorothy 2.00 

Nugent, Joseph 2.00 

Oliver, Hazel W 2.00 

O'Neil, Richard J. 2.00 

Parks, Milton G. 2.00 

Parcons, Elsie F 4.00 

Parson, Mrs. Norman . . 7. CO 

Pedercon, John 7.00 

Penney, D. F 2,00 

Penney, Mary F 5.00 

Perkins, A. Hazel tine . . 2.00 

Perkins, Edgar 2.00 

Perry, Tony 2.00 



Peterson, Edwin 2.00 

Peterson, Mrs. Ruth . . 7.00 

Phillips, Andrew S 5.00 

Piper, Ralph W 2.00 

Price, Daniel 7.00 

Prouse, Walter L 2.00 

Putnam, F. W., transferred — 

Rahberg, F. J 2.00 

Reed, G. Howard 14.00 

Reed, Otis 5.00 

Reed, Mildred V 5.00 

Reid, Robert A 2.00 

Reynolds, Mrs. Arthur . 2.00 

Richardson, Harold M. . 2.0O 

Robbins, Mildred H. .. 5.00 

Roche, Frank B 2.00 

Roche, Lawrence ...... 2.00 

Rugg, George 2.00 

Sanborn, E. R. .... 5.00 

Sargent, Mrs. George W. 2.00 

Scribler, Harry V. ... 2.00 

Sebastian, Lester A. . . . 2.00 

Sheehan, Paul B 5.00 

Simeone, Frank 2.00 

Starck, Cecil .... . 2.00 

Sawyer, Benjamin H. . . 2.00 

Scanlon, Ruth H 2.00 

Smith, Hattie E. and 

Martha F. 2.00 

Smith, Ralph L 2.00 

Shapley, Eva C. ... 2.00 

Soar, W. Henry 2.00 

Spinney, Marion 2.00 

Stevens, John Jr 2.00 

Stoney, Reginald 2.00 

Swanson, Hilda ...... 2.00 

Sylvia, Emanuel 2.00 

Taylor, Lillian L 2.00 

Taylor, Simon D 2.00 



—44— 



Taylor, Spencer H. 2.00 

Teele, Henry 2.00 

Tewksbury, Charles B. . 2.00 

Thompkins, Elizabeth . 5.00 

Thome, Frank A 2.00 

Todd, George S, 27.00 

Tolman, Wilbur ...... 5.00 

Towne, Mrs. Roger P. . 2.00 

Tracy, Alfred H 2.00 

Turnbull, Mrs. George L. 2.00 

Tuttle, George F 2.00 



Tuttle, Osgood 5.00 

Waite, Frederick A, . . . 7.00 

V/arren, William R. . . . 2.00 

Watkins, John H 2.0Q 

Wayne, J. Arthur 2.00 

Whitcomb, Roy 2.00 

Willett, Charles E 2.00 

Wise, Glenna 2.00 

Wood, Elizabeth 2.00 

Wood, Ruth 2.00 



240 licenses at f 2.^ 

54 licenses at 5.^ 

1 licenuse at 50. 

Deduct fees 295 at 20 cents 

Paid to Town Treasurer . . 



Notice 



S480.00 

270.00 

50.00 



?800.00 
59.00 



S741.00 



All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the owners or 
keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, regard- 
less of time of year ownership is acquired. 

No tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



45— 



JURY LIST REVISED — 1936 



Precinct 1 



Edward S. Forbes 
Frank S. Rogers 
George A. Richardson 
Oliver D. Wood 



Spencer H 
Charles E. 
J. A. VanW 
Charles 
James W. Couffhlin 



T 



Fred Billings 
John G. Maguire 
H. L. Jones 
David Clayton 



Precinct 2 



James Brov^n 
William S. Jones 
Lossie E. Laird 



Carl Flint 
Henry Capelle 



David R. Kinsley 
Howard C. Tracy 
John W. Hurley 
Arthur H. Wether bee 



Precinct 3 

George A. Rifford 
Benjamin Coolidge 
Warren Davis 
August N. Hederstedt 
William Munn 



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-59 — 



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-60- 



Police Department 



To the Honorably Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31st, 1936. 

Persons calling at the office 246 

Telephone calls received 979 

Telephone calls made 342 

Emergency calls received by radio 6 

Complaints received and investigated 126 

Persons questioned during investigations 33 

Arrests and prosecutions made on following complaints : 

Drunkenness 10 

Operating under the influence of liquor 4 

Operating so as to endanger 5 

Leaving scene after causing personal injuries 1 

Leaving scene after causing property damage 1 

Assault with a dangerous weapon 1 

Assault and Battery 9 

Larceny 6 

Breaking and entering in the night time 4 

Begetting 1 

Failing to slow at intersection 1 

Operating without a license 1 

Disturbing a Public Assembly 1 

Non-support 1 

Disorderly-conduct 1 

Non-payment of wages 1 

Fishing without a license 1 

Larceny of motor vehicle 3 

Using a motor vehicle without authority 1 

Failing to obey traffic sign 72 

Attempted suicides reported . 2 

Committed to State Institutions 2 

Persons sent home when intoxicated 4 

Automobile accidents reported 48 

Injured in automobile accidents 31 



—61— 

Fatal accidents 2 

Operators warned for not stopping at, stop sign 350 

Licenses suspended or revoked 18 

Letters of recommendation given for reissuing licenses . . 7 

Registrations revoked 8 

Cars stopped during safety^ drive and 0. K. stickers given 400 

Persons assisted after accidents 6 

At Concord District Court 50 

At East Cambridge Superior Court 21 

At Boston Municipal Court 1 

Summonses served 5 

Summonses served for other departments 12 

Summonses returned without service 2 

Accidental shootings reported 1 

Hunters warned for shooting too near highway . 2 

Dogs reported killed by autos 12 

Persons reported bitten by dogs 3 

Dogs reported lost 15 

Dogs returned home or located 9 

Poultry reported killed by dogs . 104 

Rabbits reported killed by dogs 6 

Notice of unpaid licenses mailed to dog owners 122 

Did Traffic duty at 

Fires 24 

Graduation 1 

Road Race 1 

Funerals • . • • 10 

Weddings 1 

Firemen's Muster 1 

Town Meetings and Caucus 3 

Parades 2 

Fire alarms sounded 1 

Boys stopped from coasting in streets 6 

Boys stopped from playing ball on common 15 

Runaway boys picked up and returned home 4 

Juveniles reprimanded 27 

Permits issued to work on the Lord's Day 6 

Ballots taken from Express Office to Town Hall 3 

Persons warned for minor violations 8 



—62— 

Obstructions in street reported to and removed by this 

Department 8 

Dangerous places reported to Superintendent of Streets . . 24 
Complaints made to this Department of slippery road con- 
dition 2 

Put off premises after refusing" to leave for owner 1 

Larceny by check reported 1 

Doctors called to treat prisoners 2 

Stray cattle reported and taken care of . . 12 

Assisted in search of prispners 1 

Emergency calls delivered to persons 16 

Breaks reported 5 

Homes checked on during absence of owners on request . . .8 

Prowlers reported 9 

Public buildings checked on, lights left burning 4 

Doors found open in buildings 3 

Windows reported broken 123 

Persons reported as missing to this Department 8 

Persons broadcast for by this Department 5 

Missing persons picked up or located 8 

Protection given to persons while obtaining property ... 1 

Posting Warrants 5 

Collecting ballots 4 

Jury blanks filled out for District Attorney's office 4 

With Water Dept. Collector during collection of money . . 2 

Protection during transportation of money to Bank 2 

111 people assisted 3 

Suspicious persons picked up following complaint 1 

Restitution made for broken windows ?67.00 

Restitution made for damage caused by Hallowe'en pranks 15.00 

Property reported stolen: S47.00 in cash; cigars, cigarettes, 
candy, etc., valued at |25.00; tools valued at |50.00; two electric 
motors; two muresco brushes, valued at |20.00; one 5-gallon 
container ; 40 pounds of brass ; two dozen shovels ; two axes ; two 
bars; 23 gallons of gas; 1 automobile. 

Property recovered: $25.00 in cash; tools valued at S50.00; 
1 bicycle; 2 automobiles; cigars, cigarettes, candy, etc., valued 
at $25.00 ; 2 axes ; 2 bars and 1 lot of lumber. 



-63- 



Trips made to other cities and towns during investigations, 



etc. : 

Arlington 1 

Billerica .......;... 8 

Cambridge 3 

Concord 7 

Harvard 3 

Lowell . 1 

Medford 1 

West Concord 12 



Bedford 3 

Boston 4 

Charlestown 1 

Fitchburg . . 1 

L^ittleton . 3 

Maynard 13 

Waltham 1 

Westboro 1 



Trips made to other sections of town outside regular patrol: 

Acton Center 14 East Acton 18 

.North Acton 22 West Acton 42 

Respectfully submitted, 



MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



— 64 — 

Report of Inspector of Animals 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of the Town of Acton : 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for the 
year 1936. 

Cows 488 

Young Cattle 91 

Swine 167 

Sheep 75 

Goats 1 

Bulls 21 

Quarantined four dogs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. MUNN, 

Inspector. 

Report of Dog Officer 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report, as Dog Officer, covering work 
done for the year 1936: 
Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law ....... 52 

Number of dogs sold in accordance with law 3 

Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance with 

law 15 

Total number of dogs handled ; 70 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 43 

Appropriation $200.00 

52 dogs at 13.00 for six days' board 156.00 

52 dogs at $1.00 for disposal 52.00 

Total for board and disposal $208.00 

Gentlemen : 

I therefore, recommend that the approrpiation for the year 
1937 be the same $200.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 
^ Dog Officer. 



—65- 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTH 
CONTROL WORK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1936. 

In accordance with the vote of the last annual Town Meeting 
a new Fitz Henry Guptil sprayer was bought at a cost of 
$833. This made it possible to spray all of the shade trees in 
town for the first time in several years. 

The state furnished about two hundred dollars worth of lead 
for this work and the cost to town for labor and truck hire was 
approximately $380. 

The balance of the appropriation was used for creosoting 
nests and for other necessary work as directed by the state 
superintendent. 

An appropriation of |1,300 is recommended for 1937 to 
cover the cost of moth control including the spraying of shade 
trees. 

The Abbott sawfly is now infesting certain sections of the 
town and will require special attention in addition to the us- 
ual work. The cost of lead for spraying will also have to come 
out of this appropriation next year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Supt. of Moth Control. 



-66— 



Report of Superintendent of Streets 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report covering the highway mainten- 
ance and construction work during 1938. 

In addition to regular maintenance work such as scraping, 
dragging, surface repair and packing, part of the following 
streets have been surface treated, 
•■.,:: With cutback asphaltic oiL 
i Newtowne Koad, Concord Street, Parker Street, Lower Brook 
Road, School Street, Stow Road, Martin Street, Maple Street, 
Prospect Street, Piper Street, Harris Street, Strawberry Hill 
:Road,;Esterbrook Road, Pope Road, Wetherbee Street, Concord 
Road, Hosmer Street, Tayter Road, Main Street, Woodbury 
Lane. Nagog Hill Road, Central Street, Willow^ Street, Davis 
Terrace, Wright Terrace. 

; - Maple Street scarified and re-shaped 800 square yards and 
drainage, Massachusetts Avenue one drop inlet. 
.- Willow Street 24 feet of 30-inch corrugated Pipe and two ce- 
■.>l3ient headers. 

Parker Street sixty-nine cement posts. 

.;);,: Arlington Street gravel 1500 feet, and four cement hieaders. 

yuM^Lin Street scarified and re-shaped 2400 square yards. .> 

^^,i: Railroad bridge over Marlboro branch at station replanked, ; 

Tayter road twenty-seven feet 15-inch iron pipe. 

School Street 94 feet 6-inch iron pipe and one drop inlet. 

Respectfully submitted, 



1 'V\ 1 ,- ■: 



A. H. PERKINS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



■67— 



Assessors' Report 



Tax assessed as follows : 

Buildings, exclusive of land |2,442,120.00 



Land . . 
Personal 



Valuation April 1, 1935 , . 

Decrease in valuation . . , 
Rate of taxation, $28.50 

Real estate . ,/. 

Personal estate ...... .^ 

Polls :... ... 



Amount of Money Raised: 

/State Tax , . ., 

County Tax :....: , 

State Parks .:Tax 

Public Welfare Overdraft, 1934 

Account . .'. .................. 

Difference in State and County 

Taxes, 1935 

Tov/n Grant 



Added Assessment: 

Poll Tax 

Personal Tax . . 

Real Estate Tax 



Excise: 

Number of Vehicles Assessed . . . . 
Total Valuation of Motor Vehicles 

Rate of Taxation, $33.38 
Total Excise Tax , 



688,225.00 
625,315.00 



$89,214.86 

17,821.45 
1,774. 



$6,000.00 
5,940,19 

. 57.50 

1.66 

333.97 

92,833.06 

3,643.93 



$34.00 

49.88 

9.98 



53,755,660,00 
3,772,838.00 

17,178. 



$108,810.31 



$108,810,31 



$93.86 

1191 

;258,820.00 

$6,878.63 



WARREN H. JONES, 
ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
HENRY L. HAYNES, ' ' 

Board of Assessors. 



—68— 

Report of Tax Collector 

1932 TOWN TAX 
Dr. 

Tax Title Adjustment $18.48 

Interested Collected 3.85 



Cr. 
Paid Treasurer $22.33 



1933 TOWN TAX 

Dr. , 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 $7.08 

Tax Title Adjustment 18.88 

Interest Collected 2.95 

Paid Treasurer $21.83 

Abated 7.08 

1934 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 . » $11,27^.37 

Interest Collected 972.42 

Costs Collected 23.45 

Tax Title Adjustment 20.48 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $11,044.57 

Abated 704.63 

Tax Title 540.52 

1935 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 $31,290.05 

Poll Tax Added 10.00 

Interest Collected 757.27 

Costs Collected 25.55 

Tax Title Adjustment 183.58 



$22.33 



$22.33 



$28.91 



$28.91 



$12,289.72 



$12,289.72 



$32,266.45 



—69— 

Cr. 

M Treasurer $21,607.63 

Abated 288.20 

Tax Title 738.34 

Uncolleeted Jan. 1, 1937 9,632.28 

$32,266.45 

1936 TOWN TAX 
Dr. 

Committed , |107,096.17 

Interested Collected 51.89 

1107,148.06 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer |68,119.09 

Abated 5,535.44 

Tax Title 1,893,11 ' 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 31,600.42 

S107,148.06 

1936 POLL TAX 
Dr. 

Committed $1,818.00 

Costs Collected 28,00 

§1,846.00 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer ?1,498.00 

Abated 4.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 344.00 

11,846.00 

1932 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 $227.25 

Interest Collected 1.43 

$228.68 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $30.74 

Abated 4.19 

Over Remitted 1935 1.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 192,75 

. S228.68 



—70— 

1933 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 1119.25 

Interest Collected 5.34 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $37.53 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 87.06 

1934 EXCISE 
. ;,;,;■--./• Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 |1,059.16 

Interest Collected 94.64 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $816.49 

Abated 107.83 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 229.48 

1935 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1936 2,425.69 

Added Dec. 21, 1936 3.64 

Interest Collected 77.15 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,720.69 

Adjustment 20.00 

Abated 24.14 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 741.65 

1938 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Committed $6,878.63 

Interest Collected 5.28 



$124.59 



$124.5? 



$1,153.80 



$1,153.80 



$2,508.48 



$2,508.48 



$6,8,83..91^ 



—71- 



Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $4,168.44 

Abated 183.23 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 2,534.24 



$6,883.91 



C. A. DURKEE, 



Collector. 



SUMMARY OF TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

Total Debits 

1932 Town Tax $22.33 

1933 Town Tax 28.91 

1934 Town Tax 12,289.72 

1935 Town Tax , 32,286.45 

1936 Town Tax 107,148.08 

1936 Poll Tax 1,848.00 

1932 Excise Tax ,.. 228.68 

1933 Excise Tax ' 124.59 

1934 Excise Tax . 1,153.80 . . 

1935 Excise Tax 2,508.48 

1936 Excise Tax . . 6,883.91 

Total Credits 

Over Remitted 1935 $1.00 

Cash Paid Treasurer 109,085.34 

Abated ^ : „. 6,858.74 

Tax Title 3,171.97 

Adjustment 1935 Excise 20.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 45,381.88 



,' • t 



.k'""''- '■ 



$164,498:93 



1 ) '{ 



;164,498.93 



C. A. DURKEE, 

Collector. 



-72— 



Fire Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report for the Fire Department for the 
year of 1936. 

The total number of alarms responded to by the entire de- 
partment are as follows: 



Building, 8 ; auto, 3 ; chimney, 14 ; false, 1 ; miscellaneous, 2 ; 

out of town, 1. 

Total cost of extinguishing $216.50 

The two new Seagrave-Reo pumping engines purchased this 
year were put into service July 15th, after successfully passing 
the fire underwriter's tests. 



like to say at this time that these two pieces of ap- 
paratus have proven to be way beyond our expectations and I 

fee! satisfied that the town's money was well spent. 

This year the pump at Acton Center was run through the 
imder writer's test and, of course, accepted by same. 

The original pump at West Acton was also reconditioned this 
year, making our total fire fighting apparatus in first class condi- 
tion, with the exception of a shortage in hose. 

' I would like to recommend the sum of $1,500.00 be appro- 
priated to replace the present siren at West Acton with an ap- 
proved whistle, and that the sum of S550.00 be appropriated for 

new hose to help fill in the shortage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



-73- 



rest Warden's 



To ttie Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for the 
year ending December 31st, 1936: 

Total number of fires responded to 28 

Out of town 2 

Total cost of extinguishing 1494.10 

For the fire at Laws Brook Road w^e called in help from Con- 
cord, Harvard and the State. 



of these fires were railroad fires and the railroad reim- 
bursed to the to'wn the costs. 



forest truck and equipment are in good shape with the 
exception of hose. I would recommend the purchasing of a rea- 
sonable amount of new hose each year, until this condition is 



I would recommend an appropriation this year, the same as 
last, which was |500.00 for prevention and extinguishing of for- 
est fires and $200.00 for new hose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



—74- 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year endiilg 
December 31, 1936. 

The appropriation of |500.00 which was made for this "worl^ 
lasL year is only sufficient to take care of emergency work. 

It was devoted entirely to the rem.oval of dangerous trees and 
limbs, ' 

■ We have now reached the point where some consideration 
should be given to the replacement of shade trees many of v/hich 
have been removed in recent years. 

I therefore recommend that SI, 200. 00 be appropriated next 
year to allow for the planting of a substantial number of trees 
5n addition to the emergency work of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, =; ^ [- 

._„ , ,, JAMES J. KNIGHT, ..^.,, 

Tree Warden, 



-75— 



Report of the Board of Health 



For the Year Ending Dec; 31, 1936 

Burial permits issued in Acton 24 

Residents who died in other Towns 13 

Total number of deaths recorded ................. . . . . . . .37 

Non-resident burials 21 

List of contagious diseases reported to the Board of Health 
January 1, 1936, to January 1, 1937. 

Dog bite 5 

Lobar Pneumonia ''"2 

Measles .\ ,,......;.,.....,, 2 

Mumps 14 

Scarlet Fever .' ' '.;. ..... '., ' 1' 

Total ... .............. 24 

Deaths: None. 

, -Your Board would recommend that |1,G00.00 be appropriated 
for the use of the Board for the present year. 

CHARLES A. DURKEE, Agent, 

Acton Board of Health. 



-76- 



Keport of Town Norse 



Board of Health 
Acton, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report as Town Nurse, for year ending 
Dec. 31, 1936, Included as a part of my report is that of your 
former nurse, Mrs. Lillian F. Taylor, whose efficient work I shall 

endeavor to carry on. 

Bedside Nursing 1661 

Welfare Calls 312 

Pre-natal Calls 186 

Post-natal Calls 112 

Child Welfare Calls 258 



the exception of the prevalence of Mumps, which oc- 
curred during February-March, we have had no serious Com- 
munity illness. This disease, for the greater part affected the 
children and seriously disturbed the school attendance. I think 
that there would be a good response on the part of parents to 
public meetings and discussions; on subjects related to Health, 
both personal and public health. 

It is hoped that the Clinic for Diphtheria Immunization, will 
again be held this Spring, with a better response from children 
in Pre-school group. Children at this age are most susceptible 
to Diphtheria, hence are in most need of protection. 

There has also been an interest shown in and a need of Well 
Child Conference, which I hope may develop this coming year. 

I wish to thank those who have made contributions to the 
Nursing service, of clothing and other materials ; I am also ap- 
preciative of courtesy shown me during this, my first year as 

Public Health' Nurse of Acton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



—77- 



For the year ending December 31, 1936 

Investments ' 

Warren Institution for Savings ....... |1,465.3E 

Chariestown Five Cents Savings Bank. . 1, 

City Institution for Savings Lowell .... 1, 



;3,465.38 



Receipts 

Warren Institution for Savings ........ . |36. 

Chariestown Five Cents Savings Bank . . 30. 

City Institution for Savings Lowell 25. 



$91.68 



Payments 
Harlan E. Tuttle, treasurer of 

Evangelical Church in Ac^ton ...... $75.00 

Fred W. Green, care of Goodnow 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Added to Savings deposit B,^S 



CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



—78— 

Report of the Work of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service In Acton for the Year 1938 

Mr. George A. Richardson, 
Hosmer Road, 

Acton, Massachusetts. 

I am enclosing a report of the Extension Service work de- 
veloped in your town for the year 1936, as shown by the rec- 
ords of our agents. If it is possible for you to do so, I would 
appreciate your making such changes as you desire in the re- 
port and having it submitted to the town to be included in their 
annual report. This policy has been carried on in Middlesex 
county for a great many years. The Extension Service being 
a county institution, available to all the towns of the county, 
makes it seem advisable to make these reports available to 
the voters of the towns. 

As most of the town reports have to be in promptly at this 
season of the year, I would appreciate your giving it your ini-' 
mediate attention. 

Thanking you for your cooperation, I am 

Yours very truly, 

A. F. MacDOUGALL, 

Director. 

following is a report of the work of the Middlesex 
Extension Service in the town of Acton for the year 
1936, • 

As is generally known, this is a county institution carried on 
by The Trustees for County Aid to Agriculture, appointed by 
the County Commissioners for the development of agriculture 
arid homemaking in Middlesex county. Each town is repre- 
sented by a director appointed by the Trustees. These services 
are free to any citizen of the county. Headquarters are main- 
tained at 19 Everett Street, Concord, where a staff of agents 
trained in their particular field is available upon request. 

Dairy farmers have attended the feeding and breeding 
schools held in Concord. They have been helped in individual 



—79-- 

cases' with their marketing problems. Mr. Porter Jenks and 
David F. Penney have continued their herds in the Dairy Herd 
Improvement Association. i 

For the fruit growers spray warning cards have been sent 
to all those interested and suggestions given for the material 
to use and the time of application for the control of the various 
insect and fungus troubles of the orchardist. 

A larger number of farm visits were made to the poultry 
farmers of the town upon request. 

A group of homemakers in Acton center and North Acton 

completed the, Extension^ Service course in Home Furnishing 
and enrolled for the course in Nutrition on Building Healthy 

CMldren, Only the Acton center group enrolled for the course 
in coat-making. A number of visits were made by the Home 
Demonstration Agents and the State Specialists to give help 
on home furnishing, nutrition and on Community Kitchen Im-. 
proVement. Meetings on Community Singing and Folk Dancing 
were conducted by the State Specialist, Mr. Lyle R. Ring, and 
members of the Acton groups took part in the County-wide 
Music Festival held in Lexington in June, The Home Dem- 
onstration Agent judged the Home Work Exhibit at the Acton 
Fair, A new town committee has been appointed to take charge 
of organizing Home Department work. This includes: Mrs. 
Albert Durkee, Chairman; Mrs. Clarence Frost, Mrs,. Henry 
Teele, Mrs. Arthur Freese, and Mrs. Benjamin Ineson. 

4-H Club activities were carried on in home furnishing, craft, 
clothing, canning, conservation and garden. In addition, there 
was- a High School Agricultural Club which met weekly during 
school time. This club was furnished an excellent program 
with the help of specialists from the State College. 

4-H work in Acton is linder the general supervision of the 
Town Committee, of which Mr. Walter F. Hall is chairman. 
The leaders of the clubs were: Miss Jessie Kinnevan, Miss 
Ruth Berglund, Miss Elise Dickerman, Mrs. Jesse Briggs, Mrs. 
Ruth Peterson, Mrs. Paul Duncan, Frank Braman, Sidney Dur- 
kee and John McGuire. 



—80— 

An exhibit was held in the spring in conjunction with the 
regular school exhibit. Club members also exhibited in the 
fall at the American Legion Fiesta. 

Joseph Perry was the winner in the county-wide poultry 
contest, and was awarded a week at the State Camp. 

A two-day trip to the Massachusetts State College was 
awarded Victor and Robert Clapp. 

In November, all the leaders and committee members in the 
northern end of the county, held their first annual meeting at 
the High School where Miss Edith Ames, assisted by the High 
School girls, prepared and served a delicious supper. 

Assistance was also given in furnishing speakers for the 
Boys^ High School Club. 



—81- 



Report of Sealer of Weights and Measures 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit my annual report as Sealer 
of Weights and Measures for the year ending December 31, 
1936. The work of this department continues to increase as the 
Director of Standard's Office calls for more inspections, and 
a more rigid check on Pedlars' and Hawkers' licenses. I have 
found a sincere desire on the part of merchants to co-operate 
with the Sealer, and as a result I find the condition of equip- 
ment in good condition. 

There have been many new measuring devices for gasoline 
and oil added in the last three years, which has increased the 
work, and exacting a greater knowledge of such equipment. 
I wish to thank the Police Department and the Assessors for 
their cooperation, for the assistance given in checking Pedlar 
and Transient Vendor's Licenses. 

In addition to the re-weighing of commodities and store in- 
spection, I have tested and sealed the following: 

SCALES Adjusted Sealed Condenmiaed! Nol Sealed 

Platform over 5,000 lbs> 6 

Platform 100 to 5,000 lbs 1 24 2 

Counter 100 lbs. or over .... 2 2 

Counter under 100 lbs 1 14 

Beam — over 100 lbs 1 

Spring — over 100 lbs 2 

Spring— under 100 lbs 2 24 2 " 

Computing — under 100 lbs. .. 11 

Personal weighing 4 1 

Prescription 1 

Weights : 

Avoirdupois 9 136 11 

Apothecary . 12 

Capacity Measures: 

Liquid 84 3 7 

Oil Jars 11 



—82— 

Automatic Measuring: 

Gasoline Pumps 16 

Gasoline Meters 38 

Kerosene Pumps 1 10 

Yard Sticks 11 

Total 14 407 

Sealing fees collected 

Adjusting fees 

Paid Town Treasurer S70.97 

Received from Pedlars' licenses .... 

Total receipts 

Expenses : 

Boston Nickel Plating Co S8.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc. Supplies . . 5.49 

Boston Stencil & Stamp Works — 

dies 9.40 

C, A. Milbery, Telephone and Pos- 
tage . .77 



20 



44 



869.82 
1.15 

54.00 



8124.97 



823.66 

As is required, once in ten years, the avoirdupois weights, 
part of the State Standards, were sent to the State House for 
calibration. Some needed nickel plating, accounting for the 
above charge of Boston Nickel Plating Co. I recommend an ap- 
propriation for this department to cover salary, expenses, trans- 
portation and all other costs of 8280,00 for the year 1937. 

Respectfully submitted. 



CLARE A. MILBERY, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



-~83— 



Librarian's Report 1936 



Accessions: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 
1936, 20,289. Increase by purchase 314. Increase by gift, 413, 
Total increase 727. Withdrawn from circulation 319. Total 
number of volumes in Library January 1, 1937, 20,679. 



Circulation : Number of days the Library was open, 99 
Number of volumes circulated, 14,330. 
Largest daily circulation, 225. 
Smallest daily circulation, 6Q. 
Daily average circulation, 144. 

Received from Library Fines and Magazines sold and paid 
to the Town Treasurer, f 65.50. 



Gifts of books have been received from the following sources : 
U. S, Government 1, State of Massachusetts 12, Town of Acton 
356, Smithsonian Institution 1, American Liberty League 1, 
Atlantic Co. 1, Irene Barritt 12, Bernard M. Baruch 1, Robert 
M. Bowen 2, Albert Braman 1, Chemical Foundation 1, Chrys- 
ler Corporation 1, Comhill Publishing Co. 1, Franklin Charter 5, 
David Drinkall 1, Firestone Co. 1, Great Western R. R. 1, Albert 
Jenson 1, Frank A. Merriam 5, George N. Peet 1, Mrs. Lucretia 
Phalen 1, George A. Richardson 1, Edith N. Rogers 1, Scribners 
Publishing Co. 1, Ernest H. Washburn 3. Total 413. 

Arthur F, Davis, Librarian. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 1936 

NON-FICTION 



C. B.— The Wonder Book of the Air 62A4251w 

Anon — Auto Kinks 62A100a 

Anon — Bench Marks Along Certain Rivers in 

East. Mass 52A100b 

Anon — Bench Marks in Mass. Vol. 2 SlAlOOb 

Anon — Handbook of the Soviet Union 914.7A100h 

Anon — History of the 26th Co. Military Police 

in France 940.3A100h 



— 84 — 

Anon — Masters in Music 923A100ma 

Anon — The Old Songs We Love so Well 78Al00o 

Anon — Status of Land Surveying in East. Mass SlAlOOs 

Anon — Technical Procedure for Geodetic Surveys . . . 52A100t 

Baruch, B. M.— Taking the Profits Out of War 17B295t 

Beighey— First Studies in Business with 

Concentrated Arithmetic 65B422f 

Bennett, H. — Practical Every Day Chemistry . . 66B471p2 dup. 
Bergson, H. — The Two Sources of Morality and 

Religion 19B499t 

Berman, E. — Life Insurance a Critical Examination . 33B5161 
Bishop, J. B. — GeothaFs Genius of the Panama 

Canal 922G599b 

Babson, R. W. — Actions and Reactions 922B115b 

Babson, R. W.— Cape Ann, A Tourist Guide 917.3B115c 

Beard, D. — Dan Beard's Animal Book 59B368a 

Boyd, T. A. — Research the Pathfinder of Science and 

Industry 50B789r 

Bradford, G. — Biography and the Human Heart .... 921B799b 
Bragg, Sir W. — Creative Knowlege Old Trades and 

New Science 68B813c 

Bray, F. C— The World of Myths 29B827w 

Brinley, G.— Away to Gaspe 917.1B858a 

Brinley, G. — Away to Cape Breton 917.1B858aw 

Brooks, C. S.— A Western Wind 917.3B8732w 

Bowen, A.— Picture of Boston 917.3B786p 

Bumpus, T. F.— The Cathedrals of France 914.4B942c 

Byrd, R. E. — Discovery — Story of 2nd Byrd Ant- 
arctic Expedition 919.9B995d 

Candee, H. C— The Tapestry Book 74C216t 

Carrel, A. — Man, the Unknown 57C314m 

Colby-Foster — Economic Geography for Secondary 

Schools 38C68&e 

Coolidge, A. S.— Building a Model Railroad 62C774b 

Commager, H. S. — Theodore Parker- Yankee 

Crusader . . 922P243co 

Comstock, S. — Old Roads from the Heart of 

New York 917.3C739o 

Corey, H.— Modern Canada 917.1C797m 



-ibO- 



Desvernine, R. E. — Democratic Despotism 32D478d 

Directory of Massachusetts Industries R 

Ditmars, R. L. — The Book of Prehistoric Animals .... 56D615b 

Dunlap, 0. E., Jr.— The Story of Radio 62D921s 

Franck, H. A. — A Vagabond in Sovietland 914.7F822v 

Firestone, H. S.- — The Romance and Drama of the 

Rubber Industry 67F523r 

Foch, F.— The Memoirs of Marshal Foch 940.3F652m 

Foot, S.—Lif e Begins Yesterday 20F8871 

Forbes, R.— From Red Sea to Blue Nile . 916.8F694f 

Franck, H. A.— Trailing Cortez through Mexico . . 917.2F822tr 

Furst, H.— The Art of Still Life Painting 75F991a 

J. M.— Steel of Empire . 38G439s 

f>._The Life and Times of King George V . . 924G3471g 

R. — Fourscore, An Autobiography 922G762g 

. W. T.— Down to the Seas 917.1G826do 

Z.— Tales of Tahitian Waters 919.3G842t 

Haley, F. C. — Charles Goodwight,, Cowman and 

Plainsman 922G653h 

Hankammer, 0. D. — The Art of Block Cutting 

(Lampe F. C.) 76H241a 

Hannan, W. L.— Luke the Evangelist ... 22H2431 

Hartley, D.-— The Countryman's England 914.2H332c 

Hartmann, S. — History of American Art (2 vols, in 1) 75H333h 

Hawthorne, H.— Enos Mills of the Rockies 922M657h 

Heiser, V. — An American Doctor's Odyssey '. . 922H473h 

Hemingway, E.— Green Hills of Africa ......... 916,7H487g 

Home, Robert — Great Western ' Progress 1835-1935 . . 38H815g 

Hull, J. M.— Judson the Pioneer 922J93h 

Jones, 0. M. — Inspired Children 201781 

Kansas, S. — Citizenship of the United States of 

America 34K16c 

Kerr, E. S., Jr.— The United States Coast Guard 35K41u 

Kimball, D. S. — Chrysler Corporation 62K49c 

Kitchen, V. C— I Was a Pagan . 20K62i 

Lampson, R. — Laughter Out of the Ground 81L2391 

Laut, A. C— The Romance of the Rails 38L389r 

.-:;^*^Lincoln, J. C— Cape Cod Yesterdays 917.3L737c 

Lincoln, W. M. — The Journals of Each Provincial 

Congress 974.5L741J 



— 86 — 

Lindbergh, A. M. — North to the Orient 910L724n 

Lowndes, M. S.— Traffic 62L919t 

Lyon, B. — Improve Your Memory 15L991r 

Mantle, B.— The Best Plays 1934-1935 81M291b 

Mason, B. S. — Social Games for Recreation 79M398s 

Morgan, C. — Martin Lewis — Etcher 76M847m 

Moore, N. H.— The Collector's Manual 78M823c 

Mordell, A. — Quaker Militant John Greenleaf 

Whittier 922W625m 

Morse, F. C. — Furniture of the Olden Time 74M884f 

Morrison, S. E. — Three Centuries of Harvard 37M882t 

Myers, G. — America Strikes Back 33M996a 

Myers, W. S. — The Hoover Administration, A docu- 
mented narrative 973.8M996h 

Naramore, E. — William and His Friends 73N218w 

Northend, M. H. — American Glass 72N874a 

Ormsbee. T. H. — Early American Furniture Makers . . . 72073e 

Osborne, A. B. — As It Is in America 914.2081a 

Page, V. W.— Modern Welding Methods 68P128m 

Palmer, F.— This Man Landon 922L259p 

Peek, George— Why Quit Our Own 33P373w 

Perry, B.— And Gladly Teach 922P462p 

Phillips, W. J.— The Technique of Color Wood-cut 76P564t 

Pierce, W. G.— Goin' Fishin' 63P618g 

Plowman, M.— An Introduction to the Study of Blake . 81P732i 
Pound, A. — Industrial America — Its Way of Work 

and Thought 62P874i 

Quigley, M. C— Portrait of a Library . 025Q6p 

Rodell, F.— Fifty Five Men 32R687f 

Reid, L. — Louis C. Rosanberg 76R3561 

Rey, R. — Arthur Wm. Heuitzelman 76R456a 

Roberts, K.— For Authors Only 81R645f 

Robinson, E. F. — Houses in America 917.3R659h 

Rosebloom, J. — Diesel Operating Guide 62R788d 

Ross, L. M. — This Democratic Roosevelt 922R7812r 

Russell, A. J.— For Sinners Only 20R961f 

Russell, A. J.— One Thing I Know 20R961o 

Saint-Simon — The Memoirs of Duke of Saint Simon . 925S153s 

Scheffler, K.— Holland 914.9S316h 

Sharp, D. L.— Where Rolls the Oregon 917.3S531w 



—87— 

Sheldon, W. H. — Psychology and the Promethean Will 15S544p 
Sherrill, C. H. — Mosaics in Italy, Palestine, Syria, 

1 urkey 72S551m 

Smith, A. H.— The Uplift of China 26S642u 

Smith, D. E. — History of Mathematics 51S645h 

Snow, E. R.— The Islands of Boston Harbor 917.3S674i 

Speitz, A. — Styles of Ornament 72S743s 

Sterne, E. G.— Far Town Road 81S839f 

Stone, 0. L. — History of Massachusetts Industries . 974.5S879h 

Tarbeli, A. W.— Cape Cod Ahoy! 917.3T179c 

Taylor, A. — What Everybody Wants to Know 

About Wine 64T238w 

Thomson, Sir J.— Riddles of Science 50T483r 

Tipton, D. S. — Parties and Picnics of Very Young 

People 79T595P 

Untermeyer, L. — American Poetry to Whitman 80U61a 

Vollard, A.— Recollections of a Picture Dealer 925V923r 

Vytlacil, V. — Egg Tempera Painting, a Manual of 

Technique 75V998e 

Walton, G. L.— The Flower-Finder 58W239f 

Walton, P.— The Story of Textiles 67W241s 

Warfel, H. R. — Noah Webster, School-Master to 

America 922W382w 

Whitmore, E.— Ernest D. Roth, N. A 76W616e 

Wieman, H. N. — American Philosophies of Religion 20W646a 

Williamson, J. E. — Twenty Years Under the Sea 77¥/731t 

Wilstach, F. J.— A Dictionary of Similes 42W746d 

Winterich, J. T. — Early American Books and 

Printing . . 65W788e 

Young, J. C— Roosevelt Revealed 973.8Y73r 

FICTION 

Aldrich, B. S. — Spring Came on Forever ........... .. A3652s 

Allen, H. — Anthony Adverse A426a 

Bacheller, I.— Uncle Peel B121u 

Bailey, T.— Fair As the Moon B156f 

Bailey, T.— The Radiant Tree B156r 

Baldwin, F. — American Family BlSlam 

Baldwin, F.— Love's a Puzzle BI8II0 

Baldwin, F. — The Moon's Our Home . .. B181mo 



—88— 

Baldwin, F.— The Puritan Strain BlSlp 

Baldwin, F.— White Collar Girl BlSlwh 

Baldwin, F.: — Wife Versus Secretary BlSlwi 

Barnes, M. A.— Edna His Wife B281e 

Bassett, S. W.— Turning Tide B319tu 

Bennet, R. A.— Feud of Cattle Kings B469f 

Berry, R. A. — Smoky Waters B534s 

Biggers, E. D. — Keeper of the Keys B5922k 

Billings, B. — Riders of the Dim Trails B598r 

Billings, B. — Two-Gun Harmey B598t 

Billings, B.— The Texas Rider B598te 

Blumfeid, S.— The Iron Garden B6581i 

Brand, M. — Dan Barry's Daughter B817da 

Brand, M. — Twenty Notches B817tw 

Buchan, J. — A Prince of the Captivity B918pr 

Carfrae, E.— Life's Like That ' C2761 

Cassidy, G. — Tombstone Pistoleers C345t 

Chase, M. E.— Silas Crocket C4872s 

Christie, A. — 13 at Dinner C5551t 

Colver. A. R.— Three Loves C727t 

Colver, A. R.— Windymere C727w 

Cooper. C. R,— Poor Man's Gold C7762p 

Culluni, R.— The Son of His Father C967so 

Cunningham, L. A. — Fog Over Fundy C973f 

Day, C— Life With Father D27311 

W.— Eyes of Love D311ey 

W.— The Golden Cord D311g 

Deeping, W. — Valour D311v 

\ Dela Roche M,— White Oak Harvest D339wh 

Douglass, L. C. — White Banners D734w 

Edmonds, W. D. — Drums Along the Mohawk E24d 

England, J.— The Bull Whip E581b 

Fairbanks, J. A.— Rich Man Poor Man F164r 

Footner, H.— The Mystery of the Folded Paper F687m 

Forester, C. S. — The Peacemaker F717p 

Gibbs, P.— Blood Relations G443b 

Gill, T. — Guardians of the Desert G475g 

Gingrich, A. — Cast Down the Laurel G492c 

Gorman, H. — Suzy G671s 

Grey, Z.— Code of the West G842co 






— 89~- 

, Z.— The Trail Driver G842tr 

Hauck, L. P. — Blackberry Winter H368bl 

Hauck, L. P.— Friday's Child . H368f 

Hauck, L. P.— Family Matters H388fa 

Hauck, L. P.— If With All Your Hearts . H368i 

Hauck, L. P.— The Little Doctor H3681 

Hauck, L, P. — Life, Love and Jeanette H3881i 

Hauck, L. P.— Sylvia . H388sy 

Hauck, L. P.— Truce With Life . . / ... H368tr 

Hauck, L. P. — Untarnished , H368u 

Hayes, T.— The Two-Gun Parson H418t 

Heyward, D. B. — Lost Morning H6221 

Hill, G. L.— Amorelle L975am 

Hill, G. L.— Matched Pearls L975mb 

Hill, G. L.— The Substitute Guest . L975su 

Hill, G, L.— The Strange Proposal L975sw 

Hill, G, L.— The Ransom L975ra 

Hobart, A. T. — Yang and Yin H681y 

Lanhan, E.— The Wind Blew West L288w 

Larrimore, L.— No Lovlier Spring L334n 

Larrimore, L. — True By the Sun , L334tr 

Lea, F. H. — Anchor Man . L433a 

F.— Rebound L736r 

J. C. — -Great-Aunt Lavinia L7372gr 

N. S.— The Dancing Silhouette L7375d 

N. S.— The Fifth Latchkey L7375f 

N. S.— 13 Thirteenth Street ..., L7375t 

E. — Give Me One Summer L873gi 

Loring, E, — It's a Great World L872i 

Lynde, F.— The King of Arcadia L988k 

Marshall, E.— Dian of the Lost Land M3875di 

Marshall, M. M.~The Golden Height M3690g 

Maynell, L. W. — So Many Doors ' M472s 

McCulley, J.— The Blocked Trail M1332b 

Miller, H. T.— Splendor of Eagles M648sp 

Montgomery, L. M.— Pat of Silver Bush M787p 

, H. — Argonaut W741a 

Morrow, H.— Beyond the Blue Sierra W741be 

Mowrey, W. B.— Challenge of the North M9362c 



!a 



—90— ' 

Nordhalf — The Hurricane N832h 

Norris, K. — Angel in the House N856a 

Norris, K. — Maiden Voyage N856mc 

Norris, K. — Manhattan Love Song N856md 

Norris, K. — Shining Windows NSoGsh 

Norris, K. — Three Men and Diana N856t 

Oppenheim, E. P. — Floating Peril 062f 1 

Packard, F. L. — Shangai Jim P119s 

Page, S. H.— The Tragic Curtain P1332t 

Payne, E. S.— Out of the Dusk P3461o 

Payne, E. S.— The Quiet Place P3461q 

Payne, E. S. — Shadow on the Brook P3461s 

Payne, E. S.— Thou My Beloved P3461th 

Pedler, M.— The Shining Cloud P371s 

Philips, E.— Rustlers of Table Butte P5542r 

Rhode, J. — Hendon's First Case R475h 

Rohmer, S.— The Yellow Claw R737y 

Sabatini, R.— Chivalry S113ch 

Sabatini, R. — Venetian Masque S113v 

Santayana, G. — The Last Puritan S2331 

Sears, E. H. — Meeting Currents S4391m 

Seltzer, C. A. — Kingdom in the Cactus S468k 

Seltzer, C. A.— West of Apache Pass S468wf 

Sharp, W. — Murder of the Honest Broker S531m 

Snow, C. H. — Smuggler's Ranch S674s 

Sproul, K.— The Mystery of the Closed Car S771m 

Stevens, B. B.— Walk Humbly S844w 

Stong, P. — The Farmer in the Dell S877f 

Stribling, T. S.— The Sound Wagon S916s 

Tarkington, B. — The Lorenzo Bunch T1761o 

Von Hutton, B. — Pam's Own Story V9464pa 

Wallace, E.— The Feathered Serpent W188fh 

Walpole, H.— The* Inquisitor W218i 

Wentworth, P. — Outrageous Fortune W479o 

Wentworth, P.— Walk With Care W479w 

Widdemer, M.— Eve's Orchard W638e 

Williams, V.— Dead Man Manor W727d 

Wodehouse, P. G.— Heavy Weather W838h 

Young, F. B.— White Ladies Y715wh 



—91— 

JUVENILE 

Alger, H., Jr. — Risen From the Ranks JA395r 

Allee, M. H.— Judith Lankester JA422J 

Anon — Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp JAlOOal 

Arnold, A. H.— Tinker of Stone Bluff JA757t 

Atkinson, A. A. — Skinny the Gray Fox JA875s 

Baker & Carpenter — Second Year Language Reader . . JB1673s 

Baldwin, A. H. — Sou'wester Sails JBlSlls 

Barrow, J. S.— A Son of Old Ironsides JB278s 

Bemelmaus, L. — The Golden Basket . JB455g 

Bennett, R. — Skookum and Sandy JB472s 

Berger, J.— Sleepy Steve JB496s 

Bianco, P.— The Starlit Journey JB578s 

Bianco, M. — Winterbound JB578w 

Bowman, J. — Tales From a Finnish Tupa JB7871t 

Brock, E.— Beppo JB864b 

Burkholder, M.— The Shield of Honor JB959s 

Burtis, T.— Slim Evans Air Ranger JB973s 

Burtis, T.— Slim Evans at Mys4:ery Mountain JB973sI 

Carroll, R.— Chessie JC3193c 

Carroll, R. — Chimp and Chump JC3193ch 

Carter, R. G.— His Own Star JC3245h 

Chapman, A. — The Radio Boys at Mountain Pass . . JC4661rg 

Churchill, C. W.— South of the Sunset JC563s 

Claudy, C. H. — Treasures of Darkness JC615t 

D*Aulaire, I. — George Washington JD2394g 

Dixon, F. W.— Over the Rockies With the Air Mail . . . JD621o 

Dixon, F. W. — Rescued in the Clouds JD621r 

Dudley, A. T.— The. Unofficial Preefect JD847u 

Evans, E. K. — Jerome Anthony JE923J 

Famous, H. B.— Tommy Turtle . JF198t 

Fellows, M. H.— The Land, of Little Rain JF3221 

Ferris, H. — Challenge Stories of Courage and Love . . . JF394c 

Finger, C. J.— A Dog at His Heels JF497d 

Fitzhugh, P. G. — Roy Blakeley's Roundabout Hike . . . JF555rp 

Fitler, M. B.— The Big Wharf JF546b 

Fitler, M. B.— Kid JF546k 

Fleming, W.— Talking Drums JF598t 

Fuess, C. M.— The Andover Way JF955a 

Fuess, C. M.— Peter Had Courage JF955p 



—92— 

Gale, E.^ — Seven Beads of Wampum JGlSls 

Gilkins, G. — The King's Christmas Pudding JG483k 

Gilmore, M. J. — The Secret of Scared Acres JG488s 

Gray, E. J. — Beppy Marlowe JG7782b 

Hader, B. E; — Stop Look Listen JH125y 

Harper, T. A.— Allison's Girl JH295a 

Harper, T. A.— Red Sky JH295r 

Harper, W, — The Gunniwoif JH2951g 

Hayes, H. W. — The Newspaper Game JH4173n 

Herney, W. L. — Practice Primer JH579p 

Hewes, A. D.— The Codfish Musket JH598c 

Holberg, R, — Mitty and Mr. Syrup JH723m 

Hunter, J.— The White Phantom JH9451w 

Jenkins, D. H. — The Children Make a Garden JJ521c 

Jones, I. — Whistler's Van JJ78w 

Judson, C. — Mary Jane, Her Visit JJ93mb 

Judson, C. — Mary Jane's Summer Fun JJ93mc 

King, J. — Peter and the Frog's Eye JK53p 

Kipling, R. — All the Mowgli Stories JK57a 

Lange, D.— The Lure of the Black Hills JL2741 

Lee, M. H. — Children of Banana Land JL479c 

Lisle, C— Lenope Trail JL7711 

Mallette, G. E.— For Keeps JM253f 

Meigs, C. — Young Americans JM5121y 

Miller, A.— The Chimes of Duskam JM647c 

Montgomery, R. G. — Carcajou JM788c 

Moore, G, — Singing Sands JM818s 

Moore, E. — The Picture Book of Robinson Crusoe .... JM821p 

Northup, A.— Sky Castle JN878s 

O'Grady, C. G.— The Dog that Went to the Doctor J034d 

Loiver, M. E.— Hail, California J0482h 

Oliver, M. E.— Those Thornton Girls J0482t 

Parton, E.— Penelope Ellen JP274p 

Pease, H. — Hurricane Weather JP363h 

Peck — Young Americans of Many Lands JP366y 

Penrose, M. — The Campfire Girls of Roselawn JP417c 

Penrose, M. — The Motor Girls at Camp Surprise .... JP417mo 
Petersham, M. — The Story Book of Wheels, Ships, 

Trains, Aircraft JP484su 

Phillips, E. C— The Saucy Betsy , JP558s 



—93— 

Reely, M. K.— The Blue Mittens : JE322b 

Rice, R.— The Broom Castle JR497b 

Robins, E. — Prudence and Peter JR657p 

Robbins, 0. — Escaping the Mohawks JR635e 

Sawyer, R.— Roller Skates JS2712r 

Schmidt, S. L. — Ranching on Eagle Eye JS354r 

Seredy, K.— Listening ; . . . JS4831 

Sloan, K. E.— First-Reader JS6341f 

Sloan, K. E.— The New Sloan Primer JS6341n 

Snedeker, C. D.— Uncharted Ways . JS6712u 

Stevens, D.— Tomboy JS844t 

Stevens, R. M.— What to do the Whole Year Through JS845w 

Stove, A. W.— Here's Juggins . JS8772h 

Stone, K. P.— The Six- Year-Old's Story Book . JS878s 

Tschiffedy, A. F.— The Tale of Two Horses JT879t 

Van Every, D. — Charles Lindbergh, His Life ....... J9L742v 

Van Hitchum, N.— Afkes Ten JV255a 

Warren, L. — Scatter, Her Summer at a Girls' Camp .... JW289s 

Wasson, M.— Nancy Sails JW323n 

Wells, C— Two Little Women JW4534t 

Williamson, T.— The Lobster War JW7321 



-94- 



Accountant's Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the year 1936: 

Expenditures 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Appropriation . $5,500.00 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Paid : 

Georg-e S. Braman, Chairman, salary $200.00 

Ralph W. Piper 100.00 

James E. Kinsley 100.00 

Glenna Bradley, clerk 103.00 

Glenna Bradley, postage 18.00 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., license forms, 

stationery 10.85 

Waldo Whitcomb, postage 1.28 

Robert S. Osterhout, stationery .... 10.75 

Memorial Press, town reports .... 287.51 

South Acton Dept. Store, paper .... .80 

Mass. Selectmen's Ass'n 1.00 

George S. Braman, postage, tel 1.95 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 19.50 

Town Shop, punch 1.25 



ACCOUNTANT'S DEPARTMENT 

Howard L. Jones, salary $400.00 

Howard L. Jones, postage 15.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., stationery . . 8.49 

Murphy & Snyder, vouchers 8.25 

Remington Rand Inc., binder 5.62 



$855.89 



$437.36 



—95— 

ASSESSORS^ DEPARTMENT 

Henry L. Haynes, salary $300.00 

VVarren H. Jones, salary 300.00 

Albert P. uurKee 300.00 

George R. Barnstead & Son, tax 

cards 1.00 

L. L. Applin. transfers 24.84 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books, etc. . . 75.92 

Albert P. Durkee, attending meetings 5.00 

Warren H. Jones, attending meetings 10.00 

Henry L. Haynes, attending meetings 15.00 
Henry L. Haynes, postage, express, 

tel., trip to State House 15.63 

Robert S. Osterhout, street books . . 65.00 

TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT 

Horace F. Tuttle, salary . . $200.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording births, 

deaths, marriages 77.50 

Horace F. Tuttle, telephone, postage, 

express 36.00 

Fidelity Specialty Co., ink 1.40 

J. K Fairbanks & Co., folders, file . . 27.90 

Dura Binding Co., binding 6.76 

Murphy & Snyder, paper, envelopes 8.00 

P. B. Murphy, blanks 2.75 

Robinson Seal Co., cards 4.10 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Carl Backman, Chairman, salary . . S125.00 

Bertram D. Hall, salary 75.00 

Frank Braman salary 75.00 

TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT 

Wm. Henry Soar, salary $500.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage, tel. .... 102.94 
Wm. Henry Soar, paid for certifying 

notes 12.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes ...... 11.50 



$1,112.39 



$364.41 



$275.00 



$647.13 



—96— 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., re- 
pairs 9.77 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., book 5.42 

Maynard Trust Co., safety box .... 5.50 

COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Charles A. Durkee, salary 1821.15 

Charles A. Durkee, postage ...... 94.36 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books, blanks 15.64 
Murphy & Snyder, tax bills, station- 
ery 45.10 

Burroughs Adding Machine, repairs 9.67 

Burroughs Adding Machine, paper . 2.15 

1988.07 

CATTLE INSPECTOR 
William Munn, salary $125.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Clare Milbery, salary S120.00 

Clare Milbery, postage, tel .77 

Boston Stencil Stamp Works, 

stamps, die 9.40 

Boston Nickel Plating Co., weights 8.00 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., book seals . . 5.49 

$143.66 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 
Dahiei W. Sheehan, 1935-1936, regis- 
trar $40.00 

E. A. Phalen, registrar 20.00 

E. A. Phalen, recount 2.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, Clerk of Registrars 40.00 

Albert P. Durkee, moderator 35.00 

Theron A. Lowden, election officer . 12.00 

Wm. Driscoll, election officer 9.00 

Clare Milbery . 12.00 

James P. Brown . 12.00 

Fred S. Whitcomb 3.00 

Albert R. Beach 6.00 

Bertram D. Hall 9.00 



—97— 

Louisa Price ..... ........ 3.00 

Catherine Byron 3.00 

Harold Coughlin, 1935-1936 12.00 

John Coughlin, 1935-1936 , . 15.00 

H. J. Schnair 6.00 

Harry E. Holt 6.00 

Peter Duggan 6.00 

Thomas Murray 3.00 

Spencer Taylor 6.00 

Arthur F. Davis 12.00 

David R. Kinsley 6.00 

D. F. MacDonald 3.00 

Arthur Wayne 9.00 

Timothy Condon 3.00 

Timothy Condon, registrar 9.00 

James E. Kinsley, inspection of 

ballots ... 9.00 

Clare Milbery, placing booths ..... 5.00 

Universalist Church, rent 20.00 

Oliver D. Woods, labor on booths . . 2.50 
George A. Braman, labor on lights 

for booths 2.00 

Murphy & Snyder, warrants, lists, 

notices 163.80 

Robert S. Osterhout, adv. . 8.16 

Robinson Seal Co., filing cases, cards 36.14 



I 



■ $5,497,.51 
Unexpended balance 2.49 



15,500.00 



TREASURER'S AND COLLECTORS' BONDS. . 

Appropriation ..... |250.00 

Paid: 

Charles A. Durkee $234.50 

Unexpended balance 15.50 

,. 1250.00 



—OS- 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

tion $1,500.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund . . 225.00 



Bursaw Gas and Oil Co., oil $201.57 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 60.02 

Edison Electric 111. Co 121.85 

Oliver D. Wood, janitor 150.00 

Oliver D. Wood, repair work .... 50.05 

Boston Consol. Gas Co 26.70 

E. F. Conant, labor on grounds .... 153.20 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 46.52 

Parker Hardware Co., lawn mower, 

shears 13.00 

A. W. Davis Co., fertilizer 25.80 

Spencer Taylor, mowing 50.80 

Spencer Taylor, Supplies . 3.21 

S. D. Taylor, supplies 2.80 

Acton Motor Co., weldings, battery 8.50 

Concord Ice Co., wood 20.00 

A. L. Freese, repairs 11.62 

J. W. Livermore, labor 1.50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 1.50 

South Acton Dept. Store, sweeping 

comp. and linoleum 167.00 

Com. of Mass., furniture 191.95 

A, Marsh, labor 3.20 

Charles Farris, labor 3.60 

M. W. Barteau, wood 20.00 

M. W. Barteau, labor 16,00 

West and South Water Supply 12.00 

S. E. Knowlton, painting 6.40 

C. B. Robbins, truck 9.50 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., gravel 9.20 

Geo. H. Reed, wire 5.50 

C. A. Lowell, gas .85 

J. J. Dunivan, labor 58.75 

G. W. Larrabee, labor 16.25 



$1,725.00 



—99— 

Chas, E. Smith, labor 50.94 

S. E. Knowlton, labor 6.00 

Ideal Mower Sales & Service, parts 9.60 
Hayward & Fullonton, grinding 

mower 6.00 

Pierce's Express 1.50 

Conant Machine Co., labor .60 

E, P. Gates, repairs 1.50 

W. A. Rayner, care of lot, E, Acton 10.00 

Com. of Mass., boiler inspection . . 10.00 

George L. Noyes, supplies 1.08 

F. W. Green, care of Common, West 7.68 

Hosea Gould, trucking 8.00 

Walter Liebfried, trucking 18.00 

N, H. Tenney, repairs and valves . . 10.00 

. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 109.05 

^ $1,718.79 

Unexpended Balance 6.21 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund . . . 200.00 



Paid: 

Michael Foley, chief, salary $2,140.67 

Michael Foley, exp. school break . . 8.10 

Frank Braman, services . 229.63 

George Braman, services 41.63 

Charles A. Durkee, services 14.25 

Norman Perkins, services 34.13 

Robert Willett, services 31.51 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co : . 67.24 

Dr. O. L. Clark, prof, services .... 5.00 

Leroy Hutchinson, book 15.00 

Murphy & Snyder, cards, stationery 37.32 

M. Linsky, equipment 16.00 

A. W. Davis Co., chalk, brushes . . 1.35 

Com. of Mass. Book .35 



$1,725.00 



$2,700.00 



100— 


8.15 


$2,650.33 
49.67 











Concord Radio Co., repairs 

Unexpended balance . 

$2,700,00 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Appropriation $2,800.00 

Paid : 

Annual Salaries $460.00 

Pay Rolls, South Dept 101.00 

Pay Rolls, West Dept 129.60 

Pay Rolls, Center Dept. 64.70 

Clare Milbery, Janitor 32.50 

Lyle Reynolds, Janitor 95.00 

Wm. G. Lawrence, Janitor 127.90 

Ivar Peterson, Janitor 130.00 

Ivar Peterson, care of trucks 16.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 97.10 

Edison Electric 111. Co 176.93 

A. H. Blanchard Co., gates, nozzles 65.04 
Justin A. McCarthy, repairs on hose, 

supplies 45.60 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal . 200.78 

George H. Reed, coal 177.57 

Belmont Supply Co., boots, batteries 72.07 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 25.49 

R. S. Baker, gas 3.54 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., 

hose 240.00 

A. M. Eaton Paper Co., towels 3.65 

Better Cleaning Products 2.25 

Malcolm Fullonton, care of trucks . 16.00 

Sidney Paddock, care of trucks .... 8.00 

Acton Pipe Co., valves, pipe 19.43 

J. S. Moore, brush .30 

Great Roads, garage, polish 2.60 

Murphy & Snyder, stationery, fire 

reports 28.20 

Conant Machine Co 9.58 

L. W. Bills, repairing clock 8.50 



Bright Bumper Sales 

West and South Water Supply 
Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement, 

ber 

W. J- Costello, signs 

Peter Maguire, labor 

R. A. Lowden, labor 

Henry Soar, express 

So. Acton Woolen Co., acid, rags 
A. W. Davis Co., wood, supplies . 
John Pederson, gas, oil ..... . . 

L. W, Priest, traffic blocks, labor 
C. Bobbins, carting rubbish .... 

Wm, B. Holt, repairs 

Fitzgerald Garage, gas 

Hayward & Fullonton, repairs on 

, valve 

Earl Hayward, Jr., signs ..... 

E. li. Young, pail 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., book .... 

Fritz Oelschlegel, straps ....... 

Combination Ladder Co., parts . 

Lowden^s, paper 

Gorham Fire Equipment Co. . . . 
Maynard & Acton Oil Co., grease 
Astwood & Townsend, reducer elbow 

John J. Dunivan, repairs 

J. G. Flynn, towel service 

So. Acton Dept. Store, fuses, braid . . 

E, P. Gates, work on truck 

Acton Motor Co., chains 

Acton Motor Co., batteries, charger 
Acton Motor Co., labor on ladder 

truck , 

Acton Motor Co., repairs, gas, oil 

Unexpended balance 

$2,800.00 



20.00 


36.00 


m 

10.55 


8.00 


5.00 


5.00 


.62 


7.80 


11.47 


6.42 


6.50 


2.00 


6.08 


3.52 


L 

2.00 


2.50 


.29 


2.34 


3.00 


33.75 


1.26 


4.74 


1.50 


1.55 


3.75 


1.00 


8.56 


15.00 


39.05 


39.35 


57.35 


58.86 


f^ 7(^A 1/1 


«pi-», d U^.X'i 


35.86 



—102— 

FOREST FIRES 

Appropriation $500.00 

Paid: 

Pay rolls $488.20 

Fitzhenry-Guptill Co., vacuum, tank 7.50 

John Pederson, gas 2.35 

Acton Motor Co., charging battery . 1.75 

S499.80 

Unexpended balance .20 

$500.00 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

Appropriation $3,079.00 

Paid : 

West and South Water Supply |2,825.00 

Town of Concord 253.00 

$3,078.00 

Unexpended balance 1.00 

$3,079.00 
NEW HOSE 
Fire Department 

Appropriation $550.00 

Paid: 

Justin A. McCarthy, 500 ft $539.00 

Unexpended balance 11.00 

$550.00 

FOREST DEPARTMENT 

Appropriatioin $200.00 

Paid: 

Justin A. McCarthy, 500 ft 186.95 

Unexpended Balance 13.05 

$200.00 
FIRE TRUCKS 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Paid : 
Seagrave Corporation $8,000.00 



—103— 

MOTH DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $1,700,00 

Paid: 

Fitzhenry Guptill Co., Sprayer $833.00 

James J. Knight, Labor 246.59 

James J. Knight, Truck 105.80 

James J. Knight, Tel. Postage 3.39 

Richard Lowden, Labor 30.40 

David Clayton, Labor 21.00 

John J. Bradley, Labor 3.20 

Alexander Morison, Labor ........ 48.00 

William Keliey, Labor . 32.00 

Harold Knight, Labor 16.00 

Howard L. Jones 97.60 

O^e Granberg, Labor 97.60 

Hugh Hodgen, Labor 12.80 

Howard F., Jones, Labor 3.20 

J. S. Moore, String, Brushes 6.45 

George Morse, Truck . 125.00 

Morse Oil Co., Gas, Oil 8.45 

Auto Shop, Work on truck ........ 4.00 

Frost Insecticide Co., Poles 5.52 



TREE WARDEN 

Appropriation 

Paid : 

James J. Knight, Labor _ . . $167,50 

James J. Knight, Truck . . 94.03 

James J. Knight, Tel., Express .... 5.65 

William Conquest, Labor 3.80 

John J. Bradlej^ Labor 54.60 

James H. Conquest, Labor 39.20 

William Scanlon, Labor 3.00 

John W. Hurley, Labor 38.80 

Harold Knight, Labor . . 24.60 

Ole Granberg, Labor 19.20 

Hugh Hodgen, Labor 21.60 

W. E. Anbuchon Co., Bits 1.90 

E. P. Gates, Irons 4.75 



-104- 



Wm. P. Proctor Co., Brushes ...... 1.90 

A. W: Marsh, Filing Saws ........ 2.60 

Belmont Supply Co., Powerlite .... 3.40 

Frost Insecticide Co., Saws 5.75 

J. S. Moore, Whet Stones .60 

Samuel Cabot, Paint 5.06 

Glenna Jones, Services 2.00 



1499.94 

Unexpended Balance .06 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Hobbs & Warren Inc., Book $2.50 

FranJk Farrar, Care of Dump 176.65 

Fitzg-erald's Garage, Gas 1.35 

Pitman Moore, Supplies 3.90 

City of Boston 36.28 

Com. of Massachusetts 6.86 

Dr. 0. L. Clark, Services 67.00 

:Dr. E. A. Mayell, Services 72.50 

James Kinsley, Inspection 5.20 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, Salary , 25.00 

Eaymond F. Durkee, Salary 15.00 

Raymond F. Durkee, Postage 1.50 

Dr. George H. Tuttle, Salary 15.00 

A. W. Davis Co., Lock 1.00 

Charles A. Durkee, Services as 

Agent 29.60 

Charles A. Durkee, Paid out for 

Labor ; 37.20 

Charles A. Durkee, Gravel, Sign, 

Hook 3.50 



$500.00 



$1,000.00 



$500.04 



Unexpended Balan;ce 499.96 

$1,000.00 



—105— 



TOWN NURSE 
)ropriaiDion' ■ $2,200.00 

Lillian Taylor, Nurse $166.68 

Greeley, Nurse 1,833.48 

Mahady Co., Supplies 33.70 

Supplies 48.53 

[orse Co., Supplies 6,24 

$2,088.63 

Unexpended Balance ........ 111.37 

^ $2,200.00 

HIGHWAYS 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund . . . 500.00 

Com. of Massachusetts, Chap. 81 . . 8,850.00 

Com. of Massachusetts, Chap. 90 . . 1,500.00 

Middlesex County, Chap. 90 ... 2,000.00 

$24,850.00 

Paid: 

E. P. Gates, Repairs $196,90 

John Anderson, Gravel 333.10 

James N,. Berry, Gravel 91.50 

Samuel Knowlton, Gravel 49.00 

Margaret Spinney, Gravel 122.60 

Chester Downey, Sand 77.75 

A. W. Davis Co., Tools . . 126.97 

Geo. H. Reed, Tools, Bags, Cement 60.60 ' 

Levi W. Perkins, Bags . 38,40 

Conant Mach. Co., Parts, Repairs . . 74.73 
No. Middlesex Sand & Gravel Co., 

Gravel 98.30 

No. Middlesex Sand & Gravel Co., 

Rental of Compressor 133.05 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., Gas, Oil .... 159.29 

Morse Oil Co., Gas, Oil 55.26 

J. S. Moore, Tools, Lanterns 14.65 



-106- 



Wm. P. Proctor Co., Lumber Paint, 

Cement, etc 424.81 

Standard Oil Co. of New York, 

Oil, Asphalt 4,148.91 

American Cyanide & Chemical Co., 

Dynamite 40.25 

Mass. Broken Stone Co 385.16 

Harold Day, Sharpening 4.50 

Acton Motor Co., Repairs 9.13 

Hedge & Matthers, Rental Pump . . 40.00 

Hedge & Matthers 23.50 

W. B. Case & Sons, Boots . . 26.35 

Berger Metal Culvert Co 1,304.82 

Lowell Iron & Steel Co., Rods 13.94 

MacPherson's Tools 6.50 

Acton Pipe Co., Pipe, Fittings .... 103.04 
N. H. Tenney, Casings and Repairs 

on Roller 10.02 

Smith & Dunivan, Pea Stone 6.25 

Buffalo Springfield Co., Parts for 

Roller 15.66 

G. W. Larrabee, Bags 7.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., Lock .70 

Geo. K. Hayward, Stones 2.00 

A. Christofferson, Gravel 14.10 

Com. of Massachusetts, Posts 75.00 

C. C. Cullinane,, Express .75 

W. J. Costello, Signs 5.00 

Parker Hardware Co., Tools 2.60 

Ida Gagnon, Gravel 6.10 

Horace F. Tuttle, Surveying and 

Releases 26.00 

Pierce's Express 2.40 

W. B. Mullin, Pea Gravel 21.00 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co 76.56 

Acton Granite Co., Posts 6.25 

Barbour & Stockwell, Frames, Grates 42.57 



$8,482.97 



—107— 

PAY ROLLS 
Labor : 

A. H. Perkins, Supt. and Truck .... |2494.00 

W. Larrabee 817.63 

R. Piper 20.25 

A. Beech 24.40 

J. Beech 32.40 

J. Gagnon . . 471.40 

W. Scanlon 34,80 

G. Rugg 514.80 

P. Callan 100.00 

A. Marsh 505.40 

N. Marsh 3.20 

F. Hamm 79 

F. Kennedy 2 

D. Kennedy .' 8 

R. Alien 5.60 

J. Gallant 43.00 

W. Anderson 4.00 

E. Hurley 9.60 

H. Perkins 8.80 

P. Sv/eet 1 

F. Price 

L. Priest 

A. Reynolds 

O. Tuttle 

L. Morse 9.80 

J. Trumball 7.50 

W. Lawrence 4.80 

J. Garceau 310.20 

F. Mauro 26.00 

E. Harnden 10.40 

G. Charter 20.40 

R. Thatcher 8.40 

A. Gravlin 22.40 

J. Davis 35.60 

0. Gagnon 32.00 

E. Nelson 5.20 

J. Reynolds 10.80 

O. Granberg 68.80 



—108— 

W. Kazokas , 433.40 

A, Morison 359.80 

T. Moynihan 381.20 

P. Coughlin 402.80 

R. Penney 100.80 

T. Cole 21.60 

C. Whitcomb 29.60 

A. Dubey 256.40 

J. Evans 124.20 

E. Hall 27.60 

J. Brennan .40 

R. Rogers .80 

T. Murray 15.60 

T. Curley ....".. 1.60 

C. Hewitt 1.60 

G. DiGiacomandrea 1.60 

N. DiGiacomandrea 1.60 

A. Wessels 24.00 

M. Sheehan 1.60 

H. Scribner 58.80 

L. Godfrey 41.20 

W. Charter 38.00 

W. Taylor 176.40 

J. Bradley 279.00 

W. Kelley 175.60 

E. Noterman 88.00 

J. Sisson 83.40 

M. Brown 62.40 

C. Ferris 1.60 

L. Stiles - 1.60 

F. Farrar 1.60 

P. Scanlon 1.60 

R. Sisson 27.20 

C. Cullinane 3.20 



Trucks : 

N. Perkins . .' ?1,608.75 

R. Jones 735.75 

H. Gould 507.00 

E. Anderson- 1,518.75 



$8,781.58 



—109— 



Mrs. C. Kingsley 1,945.50 

J. Briggs 57.75 

A. Jalonen 438.75 

C. Robbins 375.75 

A. W. Davis 18.00 

G. H. Reed 24.00 

J* Anderson 3.00 

E. Allsopp 4.00 

Greenough Bros. Const. Co., Shovel 310.00 



Unexpended Balance 



SNOW REMOVAL 

Appropriation ..:.... 

Paid : 

W. J. Gallagher, Ploughing 

So. Acton Woolen Co., Ploughing . . 

Norman Perkins, Ploughing 

E. H. Christofferson, Ploughing . . . 
Greenough Bros. Inc., Ploughing . . 

Henry Mekkelsen, Ploughing 

Acton Motor Co., Welding ........ 

N. E. Road Mach. Co., Plough . 

Good Roads Mach. Co., Plough .... 
Go©d Roads Mach. Co., Repairs and 

Installing Plough to Truck ...... 

Chester Downey, Sand 

J- S. Moore, Shovel 

Conant Mach. & Steel Co., Repairs . 

E. P. Gates, Repairs 

A. H. Perkins, Freight Paid 

Standard Oil Co., Calcium Chloride 
Pay' rolls on account of ice, cleaning 

centers of the villages, and taking 

down and putting up snow fence: 
Labor 



1841 
246 
396 

445 
312 
195 
2 
240 
275 



.50 
.00 
.00 
.31 
.50 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 



38.25 

62.10 

.75 

7.97 

6.90 

.96 

53.90 



17,547.00 

$24,811.55 
38.45 

$24,850.00 



939.15 



—no- 
Trucks 486.13 

$4,549.42 

Unexpended Balance 150.58 

$4,700.00 

POPE ROAD AND MAIN STREET, CHAP. 464 

Appropriation Balance $165.80 

Paid: 

Labor Pay Rolls $101.25 

George H, Reed, Bags 1.50 

Margaret Spinney, Gravel 15.30 

•Jesse Briggs, Truck 12.00 

Wm. P. Proctor, Lumber, Cement . . 34.50 

Ida Gagnon, Gravel 1.25 

$165.80 

STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Paid: 

Edison Electric 111. Co. $2,964.68 

Unexpended Balance 35.32 



$3,000.00 
STATE AID 

Appropriation $500.00 

Paidi: 240.00 

Unexpended Balan^ce 260.00 

$500.00 
MILITARY AID 

Appropriation $200.00 

Unexpended Balance $200.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF 

Appropiliation $1,500.00 

Paid : 

Orders of Soldiers' Relief Agent 955.41 

Unexpended Balance 544.59 

$1,500.00 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

Appropriation- . . ... , |8,500.00 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 

Paid : 
Orders of Board of Public Welfare 

Town Cases |5,830.84 

Outside Cases 1,566.60 

$7,397.44 



ADMINISTRATION 

Glenna Jones, Clerk |102.00 

Glenna Jones, Postage 3.00 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 4,17 

Carl Backman, Traveling Expiense 50.00 

Frank Braman, Traveling Expense 6.25 

L. J. Peabody, Cabinet 23.25 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., Stationery . . 27.29 

R. S. Osterhout, Printing 6.50 

Laffin Express 1.25 



W. p. A. PROJECTS 

So. Acton Dept. Store, Supplies . . . $8.25 

So. Acton Improvement Assn. Rent 160.00 

Virginia Milbery, Services 57.50 

Virginia Milbery, Postage, Tel. .... .65 

J. S. Moore, Trips to Lowell and De- 
livering Supplies 130.00 

Carl Backman, Trips to Lowell and 

Boston 89.35 

Carl Backman, Telephone 3.60 

Carl Backman, Travel Expense . . . 35.00 

Clare Milbery, Trips to Lowell .... 6.00 

Macurda's, First Aid Kit 1.94 

Robinson Hardware Co 2.43 



$223.71 



$494.72 



;,115.87 
Unexpended Balance 384.13 

$8,500.00 



—112— 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Appropriation $9,000.00 

Transferred from Old Age Assist- 
ance, Federal Grant 1,049.09 

$10,049,09 

Paid: 
Orders Board of Public Welfare 



FEDERAL GRANT 

Received from Com. of Mass. Federal Grant .... 
Transferred to Old Age Assistance 

Account 11,049.09 

Balance . 1,891.16 



$2,940.25 



$2,940.25 



FEDERAL GRANT 

ADMINISTRATIVE ACCOUNT 

Received from Com. of Mass. Federal Grant .... 
Paid: 

Carl Backman, Expenses $50.00 

Glenna Bradley, Services 12.00 

Virginia Milbery, Services 27.05 

Frank Braman, Expenses 2.00 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., Supplies .... 10.62 



Amount Due from Federal Grant 

W. P. A. 
Appropriation 

TREE WORK 

Paid : 

Hugh' Hodgen, Sharpening . $15.85 

Boston Harness Co., Belt 7.00 

Sudbury Nurseries, Trees 14.85 

A. W. Davis Co., Saw Blades 2.50 

James J. Knight, Truck 248.75 

James J. Knight, Sundry Expend. . . 17.24 

Frost Insecticide Co., Handles 4.73 

J. S. Moore, Rake, Brush 1.05 



$3.71 



12,350.00 



—113- 



Samuel Cabot Inc., Tree Paint 

E. P. Gates, Irons . 

Wm. P. Proctor, Lumber .... 



10.36 

5.75 
1.42 



$329.50' 



SEWING PROJECT 

South Acton Improvement Associa- 
tion, Rent $190.00 

Virginia Milbery, Sorting 36.10 

Virginia Milbery, Postage 1.20 

So. Acton Dept. Store, Supplies ... 8.34 
Carl Backman, Trips to Lowell, Bos- 
ton, Hudson 113.15 

Carl Backman, Telephone .6.65 

J. S. Moore, Trips to Lowell and De- 
livering Supplies 45.25 

J. S. Moore, Supplies 7.85 

Ye Olde Towne Shoppe, Supplies . . .30 

Ina Milbery, Patterns 1.30 

Pierce's Express 2.00 

C^are Milbery, Transportation .... 16.00 
Avery & Murphy, Rep'rg Mach. ... 9.25 
Ada French, Patterns, Sharpen- 
ing Shears 1.75 

HIGHWAYS 

Trucks $1,057.50 

Labor . 325.60 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co 25.17 

George H. Reed, Cement 14.28 

John Anderson, Gravel 128.80 

W. P. Proctor, Cement 1.76 

Unexpended Balance 



$439.14 



,553.11 



$2,321.75 
28.25 



$2,350.00 



—.114— 

EDUCATION 

Appropriation $46,000.00 

Paid: 

Orders of School Committee (see report) $45,998.26 

Unexpended Balance 1.74 



$46,000.00 



LIBRARY MAINTENANCE 
Appropriation $800.00 

Paid : 

Arthur F. Davis, Librarian $148.50 

Arthur F .Davis, Janitor 148.50 

Arthur F. Davis, Rebinding Books 52.12 
Arthur F. Davis, Cataloging and 

Writing Cards 19.89 

Arthur J. Davis, Postage, Sundries 3.44 

Edison Electric 111. Co 34.60 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 65.38 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., Coal 121.50 

S. D. Taylor, Supplies 1.72 

J. W. Livermore, Removing Ashes 3.75 

Edwin Anderson, Removing Ashes 2.00 

C. B. Robbins, Insurance 49.54 

West & South Water Supply 12.00 

Holliston Mills 1.31 

A. W. Davis Co., Peat Moss 2.25 

George Janvrin, Cleaning Clock . . . 3.00 

Smith & Dunivan, CFg Chimney . . 2.00 ■ 

R. S. Osterhout, Lables, Seals 10.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co 9.20 

$690.70 



Unexpended Balance $109.30 



LIBRARY BOOKS 

Appropriation $200.00 

Received from Library Funds 261.47 



Paid: 
Junior Literary Guild $74.00 



$800.00 



$461.47 



—115— 

H. R. Hunting Co. ............... 111.04 

DeWolfe Fiske Co. 128.38 

Jean Karr 47.22 

Christian Century 3.50 

E. S. Kerr, Jr. 2.25 

Ginn & Co. 5.74 

R. S. Osterhout 1.50 

Union Library Association 32.85 

George H. B. Turner 2.00 

Williams Book Store 1.50 

Goodspeeds Book Shop .98 

Washington Publishing Co. 3.00 

Rural New Yorker 1.00 

Herman Goldberger 44.55 

Ernest H. Washburn 2.00 

— — — — $461.47 

LIBRARY HEATING PLANT 

Appropriation . $1,125.00 

Paid: 

Smith & Dunivan . .1,055.00 

Unexpended Balance 70.00 



$1,125.00 
CEMETERIES 

Appropriation $800.00 

Transferred from Cemetery Land 

Fund 300.00 

$1,100.00 

Paid : 
A. W. Davis Co., Tools Seed and 

Fertilizer $12.15 

Acton Granite Co., 6 Posts 30.00 

C. B. Dolge Co., Weed Killer ...... 31.80 

W. J. Costello, Setting Glass 1.00 

A. Bately & Son, Flowers 31.60 

Acton Pipe Co., Pipe Fittings, 

Labor 98.89 

Perry Seed Co., Lawn Mower 113.68 

F. W. Green, Dressing 3.00 



—116— 

Sudbury Nurseries, Shrubs 33.00 

West & South Water Supply 7.00 

Horace Tuttle, Compiling Report 

and Writing Deeds 20.00 

Fred W. Green, Labor 255.47 

Fred W. Green, Horse 67.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, Labor 113.40 

Duncan S. Kennedy, Labor 161.20 

Howard Jones, Labor 116.60 

J. Beach, Labor 3.20 



$1,098.99 

Unexpended Balance 1.01 



$1,100.00 



PERPETUAL CARE 
Rec'd Int. from Cemetery Funds . . $1,132.50 
Rec'd Int. from Blanchard Fund . . 30.00 



$1,162.50 



Paid: 

F. W. Green, Care of Lots $1,102.50 

F. W. Green, Care of Blanchard Lot 30.00 

$1,132.50 

Amount Due F. W. Green 30.00 



$1,162.50 
HOSMER FUND 

Received Interest from Hosmer Fund $2,673.75 

Paid: 

Acton Granite Co., gate posts $420.00 

Ccnant Machine Co., iron gates .... 450.00 

Conant Machine Co 23.16 

Continental Nurseries 30.00 

George H. Reed, fertilizer ......... 162.80 

Perry Seed Co., mower, sprayer . . 132.15 

Carrie Kingsley, loam 8.00 

Sudbury Nurseries 510.95 

N. H. Tenney, pipe fittings, labor . . 118.82 

A. W. Davis Co., peat moss ........ 13.50 

Thomas J. Grey Co., lawn seed 20.00 

A. G. Lundberg, repairing wall . . . 20.00 



■117- 



A, W. Davis Co,, tools , 

West and South Water Supply 
C. B. Dolge Co,, weed killer . , 

John Pederson, ploughing 

F. W. Green, labor 

F. W. Green, horse 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 

Duncan S. Kennedy, labor . . . 
Howard Jones, labor ........ 

Charles Ferris, Labor 

Ole Granberg, Labor 

George H. Charter, Labor . . . 
Edwin A. Anderson, Truck . . 



17 
31 

5 
160 

152 
130 



95 
80 



17 



80 
60 



140.20 

39,60 

35,20 

3.20 

19 

X:i— I. 



12,673.75 



U. S. FIELD PIECE 



Appropriation 

Paid : 

Acton Granite Co. 

Akron Motor Cargo Co., Transp. 
Finance Officer, Rock Is. Arsenal 

E. P. Gates, Irons 

Acton Pipe Co., Labor, Lead ... 

L. A. Godfrey, Labor 

A. W. Perkins, Labor . 

A. W, Marsh, Labor 

Wm. Kazokas, Labor 

W. Taylor, Labor 



Unexpended Balance 



LIABILITY INSURANCE 

Appropriation Sl.OOO.OO 

Trans, from Reserve Fund 209.55 

Paid : 

Theron Lowden, Premiums 



1200.00 



115.00 




146,00 




10.00 




2.35 




1.50 




3.20 




4.50 




3.20 




3.20 




3.20 






1192.15 

7.85 









1200.00 



Sl,209.55 
$1,209.55 



—US- 
COUNTY HOSPITAL ASSESSMENT 

Appropriation $656.03 

Paid: 
Middlesex County |656.03 

MEMORIAL DAY 

: Appropriation $275.00 

Paid : 

Ralph I. Smith, Flowers $18.50 

Lowell Cram, Postage, Tel 1.84 

Newton Post Band . . 100.00 

Edwards Quimby Post Auxiliary, 

Dinners, Rent 70.00 

Oscar Howe, Flowers 25.76 

Lovell Bus Lines 30.00 

Taxi Service 12.00 

Boston Regalia Co., Flags 15.50 

$273.60 

Unexpended Balance 1.40 

$275.00 
DOG OFFICER 

Appropriation $200.00 

Paid: 

Fraser Kennels, Boarding and Kill- 
ing 50 Dogs $200.00 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 

Appropriation Balance $300.00 

Appropriation Balance $300.00 

VAULT AND REMODELING TOWN HALL 
Appropriation Balance $3,200.00 

Paid : 
Freeman & Clancy, , Heating and 

Plumbing $^245.00 

Smith & Dunivan 1,725.95 

B. A. King, Wiring, Lights 27.00 

Morris Ireland Safe Co., Balance on 

Doors and Shelving 170.59 



— 119-— 

S. M. Spencer Mfg. Co., Signs 7.15 

Philip Carey Co., Wallboard 13.35 

MacPherson's, Keys 6.60 

E. P. Gates, Irons 3.25 

J. Peterson 1.00 

■ $3,199.89 

Unexpended Balance «11 



INTEREST ON NOTES AND BONDS 



UNCLASSIFIED 
A|Ppropriation 

Paid: 
Smith & Dunivan, Closets in Town 

Hall $19.50 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., Latch 3.70 

C. A. Durkee, Burglary Ins 16,00 

D. J. Hennessey, Removing Shed . . 25.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, Flags 16.90 

A. Bately & Son, Wreaths 7.50 

H. F. Tuttle, Survey 10.00 

Howard Wilson, Prof. Services .... 50.00 
George S. Braman, Perambulating 

Town Lines 20.00 

Ralph W. Piper, Perambulating 

Town Lines . .. 20.00 

James E. Kinsley, Perambulating 

Town Lines 20.00 

Remington Rand Inc. Adding Mach. 80.00 

O. D. Wood, Care of Clock & Flag . . 57.00 

■ $345.60 

Unexpended Balance 54.40 



$40Q.OO 



Appropriation $1,000.00 

Paid: 
Merchants National Bank, Interest 

On High School Bonds $1,000.00 



—120— 

INTEREST ON REVENUE LOANS 

Appropriation 

Paid : 

Susan A. Hosmer Cemetery Fund . . |300.00 

First National Bank of Ayer 1,050.00 

Unexpended Balan^ee 

NOTES AND BONDS 

)riatiofi 

Paid : 
Merchants National Bank, High 

School Bonds 

RESERVE FUND 

Appropriation from Overlay Surplus 

Transferred to: 

Highways . . §500.00 

Liability Insurance 209.55 

Police Department 200.00 

Buildings and Grounds 225.00 

Unexpended Balance 



$2,000.00 



$1,350.00 
G'^O.OO 

$2,000.00 



$4,000.00 



$4,000.00 



$1,500.00 



$1,134.55 
365.45 



$1,500.00 



REVENUE LOANS 



Amount Outstanding Jan. 1, 1936 . . 

Received First Nat'l Bank of Ayer . 
Received Susan Hosmer Fund .... 

Paid : 

First National Bank of Ayer 

Susan A. Hosmer Cemetery Fund . . 
Amount Outstanding Dec. 31, 1936 



$45,000.00 
35,000.00 
10,000.00 



$35,000.00 
10,000.00 
45,000.00 



S90,000.00 



590,000.00 



—121— 

'MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX REVENUE 

Balance January 1, 1938 $3,830.35 

Tax 1936 6,878.63 

Tax 1935 Added . 3.64 

— 110,712.62 



Abatements $319.39 

Refunds . 231.49 

Adjustments 1935 Tax ,...,. 20.00 

Total Amount Collected 1936 . 6,356.56 

Balance December 31, 1938 ....... 3,785.18 

— 110,712.62 

CEMETERY LAND FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1936 , $1,122.00 

Received for Lots Sold 1936 188.00 

^ $1,310.00 

Debit : 
Transferred to Cemetery Account . . $300.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1936 . 1,010,00 

_ $1,310.00 

REFUNDS 

1934 Tax . $5.12 

1936 Tax 24.23 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax ........ 231.49 

— $260.84 

OVERLAYS 
1934 

Balance January 1, 1936 $2,966.56 



Abatements $704.63 

Refunds 5.12 

Transferred to Overlay Surplus ... 2,256.81 

$2,966.56 

1935 

Balance January 1, 1936 $3,710.82 

Debit ;: 

Abatements |$288.(20 

Balance December 31, 1936 $3,422.62 

$3,710.82 



—122— 

1938 
Overlay |3,643.93 

Debit : 

Abatements $157.21 

Refunds 24.23 

Balance December 31, 1936 3,432.49 

$3,643.93 

OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Balance January 1, 1936 $7,833.01 

Transferred from Surplus Account 

1935 Adjustment . ; 16.50 

Unexpended Balance 1936 421.33 

Transferred from 1934 Overlay . . . 2,256.81 

— $10,557.65 

Debit : 

To Reserve Fund $1,500.00 

Balance December 31, 1936 9,057.65 

$10,557.65 

SURPLUS ACCOUNT 

Balance January 1, 1936 §22,841.98 , 

Unexpended Balances 33.10 

Surplus Revenue 1936 7,333.15 

$30,211.23 

Debit: 

Transferred to Overlay Surplus 

1935 Adjustment $16.50 ' 

Appropriation for U. S. Field Piece 200.00 

Appropriation for W. P. A 2,350.00 

Tax Title Revenue 1,033.95 

Balance December 31, 1936 26,810.78 

$30,211.23 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Amount Due from Collector, Decem- 
ber 31, 1935 $46,400.85 

Received State Tax . 6,000.00 

State Parks . . 57.50 

Overlay 3,643.93 

Town Grant 92,833.06 



— 123— 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax .... 6,878.63 

County Tax . 5,940.19 

Overdrafts 1935 335.63 

Added Assessment 1935 Tax 10.00 

Added Assessment 1935 Excise Tax 3.64 

Added Assessment 1936 Tax ...... 103.86 

Tax Titles Added 729.65 



Treasurer Cash on Hand, December 

31, 1935 144,271.12 

Received Interest on Taxes ....... 1,981.32 

Received Costs on Taxes 67.90 

Receipts Other Than Taxes ... 103,670.65 



Paid: i 

State Tax $6,000.00 

State Park Tax 43.46 

County Tax 5,903.79 

County Hospital Assessment ...... 658.03 

County Dog Tax ' 738.20 

General Government 5,497.51 

Buildings and Grounds 1,718.79 

Police [2,650.33 

Fire Department ... 2,764.14 

Forest Fires 499.80 

Moth Work IJOO.OO 

Tree Warden 499.94 

Health 500.04 

Town Nurse 2,088.63 

Highways . 24,811.55 

Snow Removal . 4,549.42 

Pope Road and Main St., Chap. 464 165.80 

Vault and Remodeling Town Hall . . 3,199.89 

W. P. A. 2,321.75 

Street Lighting 2,964.68 

State Aid 240.00 

SoMiers' Relief : ' 955.41 

Education 45,998.26 



1162,936.94 



$149,990.99 
$312,927.93 



—124— 

Library Maintenance 690.70 

Library Books 461.47 

Cemeteries , 1,098.99 

Cemeteries Perpetual Care 1,132.50 

Cemetery Hosmer Fund ...... 2,673.75 

New Hose Fire Department 539.00 

New Hose Forest Department .... 186.95 

Fire Trucks 8,000.00 

Library Heating Plant 1,055.00 

U. S. Field Piece 192.15 

Unclassified 845.60 

Treasurer's and Collector's Bonds . 234.50 

Memorial Day 273.60 

Liability Insurance 1,209.55 

Hydrants 3,078.00 

Public Welfare 8,115.87 

Old Age Assistance . 10,049.09 

Old Age Assistance Administration 

Account 101.67 

Tax Title Expense 57.22 

High School Bonds 4,000.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 1,000.00 

Revenue Loans 45,000.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 1,350.00 

Dog Officer 200.00 

Refund Taxes 260.84 

Interest on Refunds .51 



Tax Titles ?3,660.20 

Abatements 1,157.12 

Abatements Excise Tax 319.39 

Abatements Machinery Tax 5,382.23 

Adjustment 1935 Excise Tax 20.00 

Amount Due from Collector, Decem- 
ber 31, 1936 45,361.88 

Amount Due from Treasurer, De- 
cember 31, 1936 49,254.73 



$207,772.38 



S105,155.55 



$312,927,93 



—125- 



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—126— 

Treasurer's Report 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1936 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1936 : 

Cash Balance January 1, 1936 | 44,271.12 

Receipts for 1936 : 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Educational Measure $ 2,015.50 

State Valuation Measure 1,912.35 

Mothers Aid 144.00 

Temporary Aid 1,533.24 

Old Age Assistance 3,788.45 

Highways 4,375.00 

Highways 2,695.00 

Highways . , 1,500.00 

Highways 1,780.00 

Loss of Taxes — Reimbursement . . . 540.76 

Federal Grant— Old Age Assist. . . . 3,273.56 

Tuition : . 531.72 

Income Tax 4,070.45 

Corporation Tax 8,273.89 

Reimbursement on Land 396.13 

Race Track Distribution 289.67 

State Aid 260.00 

Military Aid 60.00 

Veteran's Exemption 43.17 

Business Corporation Tax 254.45, , 

37,737.34 

Received from Count^^ Treasurer: 

Dog Licenses $ 453.50 

Highways : . . 2,000.00 

Dog Officer, refund 185.00 

- — — 2,638.50 

Received from Charles A. Durkee, Collector: 

Excise Taxes, 1932 I 30.74 



—127— 

Town Taxes, 1932 22.33 

Town Taxes, 1933 21.83 

Excise Taxes, 1933 37.53 

Town Taxes, 1934 11,044.57 

Excise Taxes, 1934 .............. 816.49 

Town Taxes, 1935 . . 21,299.73 

Excise Taxes, 1935 1,720.69 

Poll Taxes, 1935 307.90 

Town Taxes, 1936 68,119.09 

Excise Taxes, 1936 4,166.44 

Taxes, 1936 1,498.00 



Miscellaneous Receipts : 

John Maguire, License '? 100.00 

James Mahoney, License 100.00 

Alfred Casassa, License ......*... 100,00 

O. D. Wood, Grange Rent 86.70 

0, D, Wood, Rent of Hall ■ ■ 51.50 

Clare Milbury, Sealer of Weights . . 70.97 

Arthur Davis, Library Fines, 56.25 

Arthur Davis, Magazines Sold .... 9.25 

Town of Maynard, Welfare , 136.00 

0„ D, Wood, Basket Ball 17.50 

F. E, Tasker, M.D., Milk Licenses . . 20.00 

Selectmen,, Licenses 71.00 

Frank Bulette, P. P. Tax Title .... - 225.64 

John McNiff, License 100.00 

Fraser Laffin, Tax Title . 299.54 

Concord District Court, Fines , 226.25 

Horace F.. Tuttle, Dog Licenses .... 730.80 

Town of Stow, Welfare 12.11 

0, D,. Wood, Gas, Town Hall , 1.05 

Board of Health, Nurses Services . . " 152.50 

Horace F. Tuttle, Sale of Lots, 

Woodlawn 148.00 

Gk)udreau and Clouette, License . . . 100.00 

City of Waltham, Welfare 68.92 

William J. Robblee, License 100.00 

Warren J. Davis, License 100.00 

Gertrude Moorhouse, Tax Title 477.37 



109,085.34 



-—128— 

Gertrude Moorhouse, Interest ..... 21.95 

Director of Standards, Licenses . . . 32.00 

First Nat'i Bank, Ayer, Loan 35,000.00 

City of Peabody, Welfare ^ 193.00 

Boston & Maine R.R., Fires ... 159.15 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition . 2,860.13 

John Hill, Tuition . 58.52 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund, Loan . . 10,000.00 

Ralph Crevier, Tax Title 130.51 

Ralph Crevier, Interest 8.83 

Merchants Nat'i Bank, Fire Truck 

Not^e 1,500.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Fire Truck 

Note 1,500.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Fire Truck 

Note 1,500.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Fire Truck 

Note 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Discount 
E. B. Richardson & Heirs, Tax Title 
E. B. Richardson & Heirs, Interest 
Board of Health, Alcohol License 
Frank Farrar, P. P. Tax Title . . . 
Axel Christianson, Tax Title .... 

Town of Concord, Land Tax .... 

Fred Green, Lots Sold, Mt. Hope . 
Fred Green, Rent Lowering Device 
Allen Christofferson, P. P.- Tax Title 
Town of Westf ord, Schools ....... 

W. S. Blanchard, 200th Ann. Com. 
Chief of Police, Revolver Permits . . 

Katherine Kane, Tax Title .... 

Katherine Kane, Interest 

Transfer, Memorial Library ...... 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer 

Fund 

Transfer, Cemetery Fund 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund 

Total Cash Receipts and Cash Balance 1/1/36 $257,027.11 



1,500.00 


.88 


i 154.67 


12.10 


3.00 


129.08 


134.57 


25.12 


40.00 


48.0J0 ' 


162.77 


69.74 


66.58 


1.00 


292.50 


26.64 


261.47 


2,673.75 


1,132.50 


30.00 


ao oq4 Of 





—129— 

Payments in 1936 : 

Selectmen's Orders |201,728.92 

State Taxes 6,043.46 



1,500.00 



Cash Balance December 31, 1936 $ 49,254,73 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 
Anticipation Revenue Note 145, Due June 25, 1937 S 35 JOO.OO 
Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 146 

Aug. 1, 1937 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 147 

Aug. 1, 1938 . 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 148 

Aug. 1, 1939 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 149 

Aug. 1, 1940 

Anticipation Revenue Note 150, Due Feb. 5 
High School Bonds, Due 1937 to 1945 ..... 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1936: 

Principal Fund $ 25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 1,324.86 

■ ■ — % 26J24.86 



Due 
Due 

Due 

Due 

1937 



1,500.00 



Received Interest: 

Amherst Savings % 60.00 

Andover Savings 50.00 

Athol Savings 55.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 60.00 

East Cambridge Savings 60.00 

Hudson Savings , 112.84 

Lawrence Savings 60.00 

Lowell Savings 50.00 

Marlboro Savings 60.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 60.00 

North Middlesex Savings 50.00 

North Middlesex Savings (income) 7.26 

Waltham Savings 60.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 55.00 

Worcester North Savings 26.25 



826.35 



$ 27,151.21 



—ISO- 
Balance December 31, 1936: 

Amherst Savings . S 2,000.00 

Andover Savings . 2,000.00 

Athol, Savings .)[2,000.00 

Chaiiestown Five Cent 2,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Hudson Savings (income) 1,015.00 

Lawrence Savings 2,000.00 

Lowell Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings , 2,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings (income) 241.21 

Waltham Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings ' 2,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 1,000.00 

S 26,256.21 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1936 895.00 



CEMETERY FUNDS 
Balance January 1, 1936: 

Principal Fund S 38,587.21 

Unexpendied Balance . 4,320.21 



S 27,151.21 



S 42,907.42 



Received for Perpetual Care: 
James S. and Mabel Johson, Lot 

Woodlawn S 150.00 

Herbert A. Tuttle, Lot, Woodlawn 100.00 

Mary A. Stowell, Lot Mt. Hope . . 100.00 

Lucia A. Howard, Lot, Woodlawn . . 100.00 

Catherine Coons, Lot, Woodlawn . . 75.00 
Elwyn, W, and Ida Harris, Lot 

Mt. Hope 100.00 



625.00 



Received Interest: 

Assabet Savings Inst, (income) ... S 43.01 

Athoi Savings 28.88 

Boston Five Cent Savings 50.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 45.00 



■131— 



Charlestown Five Cent Savings ' . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Chariestown Five Cent Savings . . 

East Cambridge Savings 

Home Savings 

Hudson Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Wlaynard Trust Company ,. ,. 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income 

Middlesex Inst. Savings . . ." 

North Middlesex Savings 

Suffolk Savings 

Worcester North Savings 

Worcester Five Cent Savings . . . . 

Warren Inst. Savings 

^est and South Water Bonds . . . . 



Balance December 31, 

xissabet Inst. Savings 

Athol Savings 

Boston Five Cent Savings ....... 

Central Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 

East Cambridge Savings . . 

Home Savings 

Hudson Savings • . 

Marlboro Savings . . 

Wlaynard Trust Company ....... 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

North Middlesex Savings 

Suffolk Savings 

Worcester North Savings 

Worcester Five Cent Savings . . . . 
Warren Inst. Savings 



7.50 




9.00 . 




45.00 




60.00 




25.00 




273.15 




39.00 




81.12 




109.55 


' 


105.04 




72.02 




75.00 




• 52,50 




' 41.25 




55.00 




102.00 






1,819.02 






$ 44,851.44 


1 1,466.37 




1,050.00 




2,000.00 




1,000.00 




1,500.00 




250.00 




300.00 




1,500.00 




2,000.00 




1,000.00 




2,400.00 




1,600.00 




3,228.96 




3,414.26 




3,475.00 




6,434.35 


1 


3,000.00 




2,000.00 




1,500.00 




2,200.00 





— Ho A 

West & South Water Bonds 2,400.00 

$ 43,718.94 

Transfer to Town Account 1,132.50 

S 44,851.44 
Note: West and South Water Bond, redeemed, 
funds deposited in the Marlboro Savings Bank. 
($300.00) 

LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Baknce January 1, 1936 : | 1,467.30 

Received Interest 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings ... | 3.04 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 7.89 

Warren Inst. Savings 2.31 

Massachusetts Savings 25.46 

38.70 



I 1,506 
Balance December 31, 1936 : 
CharlestoM^n Five Cent Savings ... $ 104.09 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 269.06 

Massachusetts Savings 1,007.97 

Warren Inst. Savings 94.88 

. S 1,476.00 

Transfer to Town Account 30.00 



I 1.506.00 



CEMETERY SURPLUS FUND 



Balance January 1, 1936 S 1 ,142.65 

Received Interest: 

Assabet Inst. Savings 34.52 

$ 1,177.17 
Balance December 31, 1936: 

Assabet Inst. Savings . • S 1,177.17 



1^ 



— 133 — - 

. FIREMEN^S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1936 $ 532.17 

Received Interest : 
jsex Inst. Savings 16.08 

$ 548.25 
Balance December 31, 1936 : 

Inst. Savings $ 548.25 

WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1936: 

Principal Fund | 9,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 323.24 

Susan Augusta and Luther Conant 

Fund . l,04a.ll 

Hiram Hapgood Fund 200.00 

Luke Tuttle Fund 200.00 

John W, Heald Fund 817.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund ........ 2,047.14 

Minnie Davis Fund 326.65 

-——--— — f 13,957.14 

Received Interest: 

Cambridge Savings I 4.89 

Cambridge Savings (Hosmer) .... 61.79 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 90.00 

City Inst. Savings 115.40 

Home Savings - 25.00 

Massachusetts Savings 26.24 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Heald) . . 24.70 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 30.23 

Warren Inst. Savings 236.34 

Maynard Trust Co., (income) .... 18.91 

West Shore R. R. Bond 40.00 

673.50 



$ 14,630.64 



—134— 

Balance December 31, 1936 : 

Cambridge Savings $ 2,108.93 

Cambridge Savings 331.54 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 3,000.00 

City Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Home Savings 1,000.00 

Massachusetts Savings 1,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 841.70 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Maynard Trust Co 400.00 

Maynard Trust Co. (income) 687.00 

West Shore R. R. Bond 1,000.00 

— I 14,369.17 

Transfer to Town Account 261.47 

I 14,,630.64 

ACTON FIREMEN^S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1936: 

Principal Fund $ 725.00 

Unexpended Balance 20.92 

$ 745,92 

Received to Fund: 

Company Salaries (bequest) | 230.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (interest) . 24.66 

^ 254.66 

$1,000.58 
Balance December 31, 1936: 

Middlesex Inst. Savings I 982.58 

Paid Trustee's Order (0. L. Clark) 18. 



$1,000.58 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 

Balance January 1, 1936 : 

Principal Fund $ 82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 2,597.11 

$ 84,836. 



—135— 

Received Interest: 

Andover Savings S 

Arlington Savings " 

Athol Savings 

Boston Five Cent Savings 

Cambridge Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 
Farmer's and Mechanics Savings . . 

Franklin Inst. Savings 

Home Savings 

Hudson Savings 

Leominster Savings 

Lexington Savings 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Medford Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) . . 

North Middlesex Savings 

Springfield Inst. Savings . 

Waltham Savings 

Wildey Savings 

Winchendon Saving's 

Worcester North Savings 

Town of Acton (interest) 



Balance Decembed 31, 1936: 

Andover Savings 

Arlington Savings 

Athol Savings 

Boston Five Cent Savings 

Cambridge Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Farmer's and Mechanics Savings 

Franklin Inst. Savings 

Home Savings 

Hudson Savings 

Leominster Savings 



1 75.00 




120.00 




82.50 




41.67 




75.00 


' 


150.00 




125.00 




82.50 




41.67 




125.00 




75.00 


' 


112.50 




68.75 




90.00 


■ i- 


90.00 




97.14 




108.33 


\ 


75.00 




82.50 




IIO'.OO 




22.92 




162.50 




78.75 


\ 


300.00 






2,391.73 






$ 87,227.79 


1 3,000.00 


• 


4,000.00 




3,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,500.00 




5,000.00 




. 5,000.00 




3,000.00 




2,000.00 




5,000.00 




3,000.00 





—136— 

Lexington Savings 4,000.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 2,500.00 

Marlboro Savings 3,000.00 

Medf ord Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,238.95 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) . . 2,315.09 

North Middlesex Savings 3,000.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings 3,000.00 

Waltham Savings 4,000.00 

Wildey Savings ... 1,000.00 

Winchendon Savings 5,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 3,000.00 

of Acton Note 10,000.00 



I 84,554.04 

Transfer to Town Account 2,673.75 



$87,227.79 



Respectfully submitted. 



WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer 



-137- 



's Keport 



I Ji-ave audited the books of the Tax Collector and have 
mailed notices to delinquents. I have checked the Treasurer's 
cash oni hand and verified the various trust funds in the Treas- 
urer's care. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



Elizabeth White Fond Report 



January 1st, 1937 

The trustees have signed orders to the Treasurer for eight 
hundred and ninety-five dollars |895,00 for the year ending 
December 31, 1936. 

These orders have been given after careful investigation 
with the knov^ledge that each person is needy and worthy of 
help from this trust fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

■ WARREN H. JONES, 
WALDO WHITCOMB, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 

' Trustees of the Elizabeth 
White Fund. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



Ichool Departme 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTi 




MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Endinis: December 31 



1936 



-140- 



School Committee 

Dr. Randall Woodworth, Ciiairman Term expires 1939 

Mrs. Lulu Clark Term expires 1938 

Mrs. Leiand Howe Term expires 1939 

Mr.- Exerett Montague Term expires 1937 

Mrs» Oliver Wood Term expires 1937 

Mr. Samuel Knowlton Term expires 1938 

Meetings of the School Committee 
Regular meeting of the School Committee shall be held the 
second and fourth Tuesdays of each month in the High School, 

at 7 :30 P. M, Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 

Walter F. Hall 

South Acton, Mass. Office — High School Building. Tel. 110 

Physician Dr. Ernest A. Mayell, Acton 

Nurse Mrs. Genevieve Creeley, West Acton 

Attendance Officer George A. Richardson, Acton 

School Calendar 

January 4, 1937 — All schools reopened. 

February 19, 1937 — All schools close. 

March 1, 1937^ — All schools reopen. 

April 16, 1937 — All schools close. 

April 26, 1937 — All schools reopen. 

June 11, 1937 — Grades I to IV, inclusive, close. 

June 25, 1937— High School closes — Graduation. 

September 8, 1937 — High School reopens. 

September 13, 1937 — Grades I to VI, inclusive, reopen. 

November 24, 1937 — All schools close at noon. 

November 29, 1937 — All schools reopen. 

December 22, 1937 — All schools close. > 

Janiiary 3, 1938' — All schools reopen. 

Legal Holidays 
January 1, February 22, April 19, May 30, July 4, first Mon- 
day of September, October 12, November 11, Thanksgiving Day, 
Christmas Day (the day following, when any of those mentioned 
occur on Sunday) . Arbor Day falls on the last Saturday in April 



—141— 

and is not a legal holiday. Flag Day falls on June 14 and is not 
a legal holiday; it should be observed by proper exercises by 
any school in session on that day. 

NO SCHOOL SIGNAL—Time : 7 :15 A. M. 
Acton Center and South Acton 2-2-2-2 blasts 

West Acton 1-1 blasts 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until they 
are 5 years 8 months of age on or before September 1, except 
in the case of those children 5 years 6 months of age on Sep- 
tember 1 whose mental age and physical condition are satis- 
factory. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first two 
weeks of school. All children entering for the first time must 
present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 514 hours in the elemen- 
tary schools and 6 hours in the high .school, with sufficient re- 
cesses. , The doors of schools shall not be opened to pupils ex- 
cept by the principals or persons delegated by the principals. 

3. School Busses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools they at- 
tend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils must meet 
the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct themselves prop- 
erly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They must 
present a written excuse signed by parent of guardian for each 
absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a long- 
er period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Section 15. 

*'A child from a household v/here a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious 
or contagious disease, or from a household exposed, to contagion 
from any such disease in another household," shall not attend 



-142- 



any public school during such illness or exposure until the teach- 
er of the school has been furnished with a certificate from the 
local board of health, school physician or from the attending 
physician, stating that danger of conveying such disease by such 

child has passed. 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them by 
the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any form of 

school property. 

8. Fire Drill ^ 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the ele- 
mentary schools and at least once a month in the high school. 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 

As of January 1, 1937 

Center School App. Graduate of 

Raymond Nickerson, 

Prill 1936 Bridgewater State Colloge 

Ruth Berglind 1935 Lesley Ncrmal School 

Gertrude Puhakka 1931 Fitchburg Normal 

School 

Julia McCarthy, Prin. . . 1906 Fitchburg Normal 

Jessie Kiiiiie¥an 1929 Worcester Normal 

Florence Merriam 1927 Fitchburg Normal 

Helen Appleby 1936 Lesley Normal School 

West School 

Charles Whitcomb, Prin. 1936 Bridgewater State College 

Grace Cailanan 1935 Fitchburg State College 

Ellse Dickerman 1926 Fitchburg Normal 

Walter P. Hall, .Prin. ... 1935 Harvard University 

Henry Hopkinson, Asst. Northeastern Law 

Prin 1930 Miss Forehand's School 

Edith Ames 1927 Framingham Normal 

Elsie Bixby 1927 Boston University 

Margaret Boornazian . . . 1929 Burdett College 

George Braman 1933 Wentwcrth Institute 

Robert Dolaii 1930 Clark University 

Richard Greenman .... 1935 Harvard University 

Walter Holt . 1928 Dartmouth College 

Marjorie Jones 1931 Simmons College 

Mary St-aite 1931 Middlebury College 

Marion Towne 1921 Smith College 

Supervisors 

Frank Braman, Drawing New School of Design 

Eleanor Jones, Phys. Ed. B. U. Sargent School 

Richard Law. Music Certificates from Harvard, St. 

Peter's College, and Boston 

University 



Home Address 

Orleans 
South Acton 
Fitchburg 



South Acton 
Worcester 
South Acton 
Concord 



Merrimacport 
West Acton 
Ayer 



South Acton 
West Acton 
Melrose 
Woodville 

Methuen 
Acton 
Marlboro 
Concord 
East Acton 
South Acton 
South Acton 
Concord 



Acton 

Sooith Acton 
West Nev/ton 



-^143— 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the voters of Acton : . • 

The. School Committee presents herewith its report for the 
year 1936, together with the report of the Superintendent of 
Schools, which has the approval of the committee and is recom- 
mended to your study and attention. 

The committee feels that at no time has the school pupil of 
Acton had the advantages now available, due to the splendid 
co-operation of the townspeople and the efforts of the faculty 
and committee — with no appreciable increase in cost. 

The new manual training course is functioning beyond what 
we had expected, training many boys in a useful way and keep- 
ing them interested. Many of these boys, previous to the in- 
stigation of this course, might have shown little disposition to- 
ward attendance. The order, care of tools and material, and in- 
terest shown are surely a splendid assurance that Mr. George 
Braman is worthy of his place among the instructors. 

The newly organized physical education course, under Miss 
Eleanor Jones, is something well worth the effort. Not only 
does the pupil get his regular organized exercise, which is im- 
perative, along with his studies, to promote a healthy body as 
well as an alert mind, but he is also corrected as to posture, a 
previously neglected, important part of a young person's well- 
being. The work has been extended to the elementary grades. 
We wish w^e might be able to put Miss Jones on a full-time basis, 
but the budget does not warrant it at this time. 

The new transportation plan, we think, is accepted by every- 
body as a worthwhile effort. Not only does it help in getting 
pupils to their respective schools on time, but the removal of 
gTOups of rollicking, carefree children from the busy highways 
creates, in no small way, a peace of mind both to the parents and 
the drivers of vehicles. 

It might be fitting at this time, as a matter of appreciation, 
respect, and record, to mention the thirty-eight long years of 
faithful service rendered bv the late Miss Ella Miller. Her 



—144— 

wealth of love, interest, and affection, to say nothing of her 
sacrifices, will be long remembered by her many pupils. 

The possibility of acquiring a new central elementary plant, 
with the aid of a forty-five per cent actual grant from the Fed- 
eral government, at this time, would seem to be a wise move for 
the voters of Acton. The town is in good financial condition; 
the government is, willing to help ; the interest rate on bonds is 
at its lowest in years. It is something that must come sooner 
or later, and at a later date the expense will be necessarily shoul- 
dered entirely by the tov/n. Sound thinking would say — accept 
it! In so doing it would give employment to all available ar- 
tisans in the town, as well as save considerable on operating ex- 
pense as time goes on. Please give this matter some serious 
thought. 

In the meantime, we, ask you at town meeting to appropriate 
the same amount of money as last year, and we will try to ex- 
pend it as wisely as is possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. N. WOODWORTH, Chairman. 



COMPARISON OF COSTS FOR OPERATING 

ACTON SCHOOLS 



Mass. School Fund: 1936 1935 1934 1933 

Part I $3,886.00 $4,031.00 $4,012.00 S3,885.00 

State Wards 531.72 525.58 697.60 651.16 

$4,417.72 $4,556.58 $4,709.60 $4,536.16 
Out-of-town Tuition *2,439.03 2,615.37 2,549.86 2,250.62 

Total $6,856.75 $7,171.95 $7,259.46 $6,786.78 

Expended from Appropriation 45,998.26 43,498.72 41,499.77 39,999.63 

Net cost to town $39,141.51 $36,326.77 $34,240.31 $33,212.85 

Appropriation 46.000.00 43,500.00 41,500.00 40,000.00 

Special Appropriation 837.22 1,100.00 

*Approximate amount. Any discrepancy between this amount and that in 
the Treasurer's report is due to the fact that only money received for tuition 
for the year 1936 is included here. 



—145— 
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES FOR 1937 



I. General Control 

1. School Committee: 
Salaries : 

2. Superintendent of Schools and 

Enforcement of Law : 

Salary of Superintendent $2,000.00 

Salary of Clerk 150.00 

Salary of Attendance Officer . . 30.00 

Office Expenses : 

Telephone |60.00 

Print'g, Forms 75.00 

Books 15.00 

Miscellaneous . 20.00 

170.00 



11. Expenses of Instruction 

3 Supervisors' Salaries, Music, 

Art, Physical Education |1,400.00 

4. Principals' Salaries 



High $1,000.00 

Elemenljary . . . 3,600.00 



5. Teachers' Salaries: 

High $11,500.00 

Elementary . . . 11,400.00 



6. Textbooks: 

High $300.00 

Elementary . . . 200.00 



7. Stationery and Supplies: 

High $800.00 

Elementary . . . 300.00 



4,600.00 



22,900.00 



500.00 



1,100.00 



;2J50.00 



30,500.00 



—146— 

III. Expenses of Operating School Plant 

8. Wages of Janitors : 

High Sl,300.0'0 

Elementary ... 2,046.00 

3,346.00 

9. Fuel:;: 

High §800.00 

Elemientary ... 1,000.00 

1,800.00 

10. Miscellaneous : 

High : 

Gas 150.00 

Electricity . . 200.00 

Water 50.00 

Misc 200.00 

500.00 

Elementary : 

Electricity . . S80.00 

Water 50.00 

Misc 170.00 

300.00 

5,946.00 

IV. Maintenance and Repairs 

11. High 500.00 

Elementary . 700.00 

1,200.00 

V. Auxiliary Agencies 

12. Libraries 50.00 

13. Health 250.00 

14. Transportation 5,500.00 

5,800.00 

VI. Miscellaneous Expenses 

15. Sundri'es 104.00 

16. Vocational Education 100.00 

17. Evening School 000.00 

204.00 

VH. Outlays 

18. and 19 000.00 



20. Total $46,000.00 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR SUPPORT FOR YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1936 



General Control 

Salary and Other Expenses of Superintendent $2,365,71 

Expenses of Instruction 

Salaries of Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals : 

Supervisors , ,. |1,304.12 

Principal of High School ....... 1,000.00 

Principals of Elementary Schools .... 3,520.00 

High School Teachers 11,365,97 

Elementary Teachers 10,735.98 

127,926.07 

High School Textbooks . .■ |454.17 

Elementary Textbooks . 492.89 

High School Stationery and Supplies ... 645.67 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies . . . • 322.25 . 

$1,914.98 



Total Expense of Instruction ' $29,841.05 

Expenses of Operation 

High School: 

Wages of Janitor $1,300.00 

Fuel 836.72 

Miscellaneous 543.52 

2,680.24 

Elementary : South West Center Total 

Wages of Janitor . . $722.00 $684.00 $656.00 $2,062.00 

Fuel 447.91 200.94 210.38 859.23 

Miscellaneous . 89.78 83.18 75.83 248.79 



Sl,259.69 $968.12 S942.21 $3,170.02 

Total Expenses of Operation $5,850.26 

Maintenance and Repairs 

gh School $1,500.66 



South West Center Total 
Elementary |106.62 ?166.28 $464.09 $736.99 



Total Maintenance and Repairs $2,237.65 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Libraries $38.08 

Health 236.75 

Transportation 4,808.00 

Vocational Education 66.70 

Miscellaneous 148.76 

New Equipment 405.30 

$5,703.59 

Total Expended $45,998.26 

Unexpended Balance 1.74 

$46,000.00 



PAID FOR SUPPORT FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1936 

Superintendent, Salary $2,000.00 

Secretary 163.65 

Office Expenses: 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co. $81.54 

Frank C. Johnson, Elementary 

Record Cards 2.12 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., File 

Folders 2.90 

Edward E. Babb, & Co. Inc., 

Stamp Pad 58 

E. Faulkner Conant, Census .... 35.00 

Old Corner Book Store Inc., Pro- 
fessional Book 2.25 

Wright & Potter Printing Co. Ac- 
count Blanks 5.21 

Spauling-Moss Co., Transporta- 
tion Map Material 3.35 

U. S. Post Office, Stamped En- 
velopes 32.48 



—149— 

Remington Rand Inc., Office Rec- 
ord Cards . 1.30 

Murphy & Snyder, Registration 

: and Report Cards, Bus Tickets, 

Envelopes 11.00 

Public School Pub. Co., Books . . . 4.69 

Dimond-Union Stamp Works, 

Rubber Seal 1.50 

Geo. A. Richardson, Attendance 

Officer 15.00 

J. L. Hammett Co., Pencils 1.14 

The Education Digest, Profession- 
al Magazine 2.00 

202,06 

Total General Control |2,865.71 

Expenses of lestriiction 

Supervisor's Salary, Drawing $399.12 

Supervisor's Salary, Music 525.00 

Supervisor's Salary Physical Education 380.00 

— .. 11,304.12 

Principal's Salary, High School ..... 1,000.00 

High School Teachers' Salaries: 

Edith Ames, Part 1700.00 

Elsie Bixby 1,695.00 

Margaret Boornazian 1,500.00 

George Braman . . . .^ 467.75 

Robert Dolan 1,400.00 

Barbara Douglass, 6 Months 720,00 

Richard Greenman, 4 Months 560.00 

Walter Holt , 1,800.00 

Henry Hopkinson 2,000.00 

Marjorie Jones, Part 518.22 

Louise Woodworth, Substitute 5.00 

11,365.97 

Principals' Salary, Elementary: 

Richard Greenman, 6 Months . S655.00 

Julia McCarthy 1,397.50 

Raymond Nickerson, 4 Months 400.00 

Ruth Sutcliffe, 6 Months 660.00 



— ISO- 
Charles Whitcomb, 4 Months 400.00 

Helen Appleby, Substitute 2.50 

Louise Pierce, Substitute 5.00 



Teachers' Salaries, Elementary: 

Edith Ames, Part 1700.00 

Ruth Berglind 900.00 

George Braman, Part 467.75 

Grace Callanan 895.00 

Elise Dickerman 1,200.00 

Marjorie Jones, Part 518.23 

Jessie Kinnevan 1,100.00 

Florence Merriam 1,240.00 

Gertrude Puhakka 1,050.00 

Mary Stolte 1,117.50 

Marion Towne .... 1,400.00 

Helen Appleby, Substitute 50.00 

Marion Holt, Substitute 10.00 

Louise Price, Substitute 87.50 



High School Textbooks 

Acorn Publishing Company $.78 

Allyn & Bacon . 104.18 

American Book Company 3.60 

Athol Motor Express .50 

C. C. Cullinane 1.50 

D. C. Heath Company . 24.48 

Dura Binding Company 32.38 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc 32.60 

Ginn & Company 80.11 

Gregg Publishing Company 15.94 

Houghton Mifflin Company 17.87 

Maemillan Company 33.25 

Scott, Foresman and Company ........ 43.91 

South-westelrn Publishing Company . . . 59.82 

John C. Winston Company 3.25 



3,520.00 



10,735.98 



454,17 \ 



—151— 

Elementary Textbooks 

American Book Company .... ... ..... . |176.25 

Edward E. Babb & Company ......... . 24.68 

Baker & Taylor Company ............ 34.52 

Charles Scribner^s Sons 50,90 

D. C. Heath Company 28.22 

Dura Binding Company . . 32.37 

Ginn & Company 5.08 

Macmillan Company 14.58 

Scott, Foresman & Company 120.69 

Silver Burdett Company . 1.80 

Webster Publishing Company 3.80 



High School Stationery and Supplies 

A. B. Dick Company, Stencils, Ink . . . ^ . |16.40 
Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc., Paper, Pen- 
cils, Supplies 117.73 

Brodhead-Garrett Co., Manual Training 

Supplies . 236.74 

Central Scientific Company ........... 38.56 

Domestic Arts Department, Emergency 

Purposes 10.00 

Carl Fischer Inc., Music 7.26 

Ginn & Company, Tests .29 

J. L. Hammett Co., Paper, Supplies .... 54.48 

•John S. Cheever, Paper 16.78 

Gledhill Bros., Supplies 27.50 

Macmillan Company, Workbooks 18.59 

Mac-Ben Sporting Goods Inc., Basketball 11.50 

Murphy & Snyder, Laboratory Paper . . 4.00 

Milton Bradley, Paper, Supplies ....... 22.86 

Noble & Noble, English Outlines 1.34 

Fritz Oelschlegel, Leather ............ 1.85 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., Man. Tr. Supplies . 3.65 

Reformatory for Women, Flag ........ 3.25 

Royal Typewriter Co., Roller and Tabu- 
lar Stops 5.25 

Science Service, Science News Letter ... 1.00 

Shreve, Crump & Low, Engrave Shield . 1.50 



492.89 



—152— 

South-western Publishing Co., Bookkeep- 
ing Sets . . 2.08 

L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriter Co., 

Tabular Stops .43 

The Town Shop, Screen Cloth 7.60 

Taylor Instrument Companies, Charts . . 4.69 
World Book Company, Tests and Work- 
books 26.33 

John C. Winston Company, Record Books 3.77 

Wright & Ditson, Basketball Guide .... .24 



Elementary Stationery and Supplies 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Paper, Supplies §102.86 

Milton Bradley Co., Paints, Supplies . . . 35.67 

Gledhill Bros., Supplies 27.50 

J. L. Hammett Co., Supplies, Paper, 

Maps 76.37 

Macmillan Company, Workbooks 7,92 

John S. Cheever Co., Paper 16.77 

Reformatory for Women, Flags 6.50 

Horace Partridge, Football 4.63 

John C. Winston Co., Record Books .... 3.77 

World Book Co., Tests 23,08 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., Bulletin Board Ma- 
terial 2.48 

Benj. H. Sanborn Co., Arithmetic Work- 
books 11.65 

South Acton Department Store, Burlap 1.80 

F. W. Woolworth, Wire Thumbtacks . . . 1.25 



High School Operating Expenses 

Daniel MacDougall, Janitor . . ... . . $1,300.00 

Fuel 836.72 

Miscellaneous : 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. . . $49.18 

Edison Electric 111, Co 297.97 

State Prison ..,.,,....... 6.61 



645.67 



322.25 



153- 



State Prison Colony, Brushes . 1.04 

A. W, Davis Company, Shovels, 

Hooks, Rakes 11.17 

Geo. H. Reed, Fertilizer, Lime 2.65 

C. B. Dolge Co., Foottub, Tile- 

brite 15.97 

Rfichard Lowden, Refill Chem- 
icals 2.50 

Malcolm Fullonton, R, e f i 1 1 

Chemlicals 2.50 

J. L, Hammett Co., Waste Bas- 
ket 1.75 

West & South Water Supply . . 46.11 

MacPherson's Hardware, Keys, 

Locks 14.85 

William Horner, Wax, Disin- 
fectant 14.39 

Albert Noll, Cresol '. . 3.50 

George Braman, Tools for Jani- 
tor 8.74 

Beacon Wiper Supply Co., 

Cloths 6.14 

Porter-Cabile Machine Co., 

Grease, Sandbelts 7.09 

Maynard Machine Shop, Repair 

Lawn Mower 2.50 

American Brush Co., Brushes 5.99 

Acton Motor Co., Gas, Oil- 
Lawn Mower 5.50 

J. S. Moore, Blackboard Ma- 

tei^ial 4.65 

West Disinfecting Co., Towels 27.90 

Edward E. Babb & Co Inc., 

Hooks 3.17 

A. J. Wilkinson Co., Asbestos 

Covering 1.65 

543.52 



Total High School Operating Expense . 2,680,24 





South 


West 


Janitors . 


$722.00 


S684.00 


Fuel . 


447.91 


200.94 



—154— 

Elementary Operating Expenses 

Center Total 
S&56.00 S2,062.00 
210.38 859.23 

$1,169.91 S884.94 S866.38 S2,921.23 |2,921,28 

Miscellaneous 

South West Center 

Edison Electric 111. Co S40.30 S32.10 S20.27 

A. W. Davis C, Screws, Glass .65 2.44 5.46 

State Prison, Brushes 90 .90 .91 

State Prison Colony . . ... 1.34 1.34 1.34 

Geo. H. Reed, Bonemeal 2.00 

J. L. Hammett Co., Baskets . . 1.75 1.75 1.75 

West & South Water Supply . . 14.36 19.21 14.84 
Wm. Horner, Drain Solver^t, 

Wax 5.46 5.45 5.45 

Beacon Wiper Supply Co., 

Cloths 2.05 2.05 2.05 

Porter-Cable Machine Co., Oil 

and Bolts ■ 1.22 1.21 1.21 

American Brush Co 2.00 2.00 2.00 

C. B. Dolge & Co., Tilebrite . . . 3.99 3.97 3.97 

West Disinfecting Co., Towels 9.30 9.30 9.30 

A. J. Wilkinson, Tools 6.53 

L. C. Hastings, Supplies 2.42 

Strong's Market, Bon ami .... .72 
Edward E. Babb & Co., Ther- 
mometers .74 .74 .75 

Vanderhoof Hardware, Repair 

Hose 1.30 



I 



$89.78 $83.18 S75.83 248.79 

Total Elementary Operating Expense . $3,170.02 

High School Maintenance and Repairs 

Allen Chair Corporation, Desk Covers . . $3.00 

American Radiator Co., Valves 2.71 



. , —155— 

H. D. Mallett, Tune Piano 3. 

Frank LeClair, Repairs on Lawn Mower 1. 

B. A. King, Clock Rectifier, Globes, and 

Repairs . . ..- , 111.00 

John D. Smith, Roof Wall , . . 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., Screen Stock, Door, 

Celotex 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., Butts 

and Lock 1.20 

Wm. B. Holt, Bubbler, Repairs 68.25 

Middlesex County House of Correction, 

Mat 4.42 

International Business Machines Corp., 

Clock Repairs 4.80 

Standard Electric Time Co., Clock Re- 
pairs 14.7^ 

Frank L. Weaver & Son, Roof 33.50 

Albert E. Sims, Fan 40G.83 

E. A. Hammond, Blackboards 17.50 

MacPherson's Hardware, Blackboard 

Material 6.65 

L. T. Fulionton, Painting 31.00 

South Acton Dept. Store, Shades 31.50 

Conant Machine & Steele Co., Steel for 

Doors 1.80 

Com. of Massachusetts, Tune Piano .... 3.00 

Woodcraft Supply Co., Jig Saw 28.35 

Ideal Weatherstrip Co., Weatherstrip- 
ping Windows 151.00 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc., Shades .... 

Lombard & Co., Power Grinder 

Waite Hardware, Galvanized Screening . 20.96 



Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 

South West Center 
South Acton Dept. Store, 

Shades ............... $38.00 S30.00 S33.00 

0. D. Wood 11.38 

Board of Water Com 47.55 



1, 



—156— 

MacPherson's Hardware . . 2.65 8.24 

Ideal Weatherstrip Co. . . . 22.45 

Geo. L. Janavrin, Clocks . . 5.00 

William B. Holt 2.25 23.81 39.30 

James N. Berry, Screws . . 15.72 37.46 

Arthur L. Freese 1.50 22.35 

A. D. Holt 6.67 

Hosea A. Gould, Gravel .... 1.50 

L. A, Godfrey 57.65 

Berry & Hale, Floor 218.57 

John Pederson, Haul 

Stones 20.00 

Albert E. Sims 1.98 2.50 

E. A, Hammond, Blackbds. 5.84 5.83 5.83 

E. P. Gates, Swings ^ 15.50 

Walker & Pratt Mfg. Co. . . 39.36 

Spencer Taylor, Lawn Care 4.10 

L. C. Hastings, Lawn Care 6.00 

J. W. Livermore, Lawn Care 5.00 

$106.62 $166.28 $464.09 
Total Elementary Maintenance and Repairs $736.99 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Libraries : ' 

Gaylord Bros. Inc., Date Slips, Shelf- 

hold^rs $5.38 

National Geographic Society, Maga- 
zine 3.00 

Science Service, Magazine 2.50 

Herman Goldberger Agency 27.20 



Health: 

Dr. Ernest May ell, examinations in 

high and elementary grades $200.00 

Dr. 0. L. Clark, service to High 

School students 25.00 

Boston Guild of Hard of Hearing, au- 
diometer tests 11.75 



38.08 



236.75 



—157— 

Transportation: 

A. W. Davis . . . : : 4,808.00 

Tuition : 

City of Boston, for Matthew Freeman $14.70 

Middlesex County Training School, for 

Clayton Quimby . , 52.00 

.-^ 66.70 

New Equipment: 

Luther 0. Draper Shade Co., Shades . . $7.80 

Genevieve J. Greeley, Power Lawn 

Mower 75.00 

A. B. Dick Co., Mimeograph Machine . 148,50 

International Engineering Works Inc., 

Lockers 99.00 

Mass. Reformatory, Sloyd Benches . . 75.00 

405.30 

Miscellaneous : 

Murphy & Snyder, Temp. Charts |5.25 

MacPherson's Hardware, Baseball Ma- 
terial 13.80 

The Bon Marche, Diploma Ribbons . . 4.80 

Clara Sawyer, Freight 1.33 

Com. of Public Safety, Boiler Inspec- 
tion 5.00 

Geo. H. Reed, Lime for Physical Train- 
ing Department .70 

Manufacturing Equipment & Engin- 
eering Co., Keys . 12.00 

Boston Consolidated Gas C, Range . . 54.15 

Tackney's Express .35 

Edward E. Babb & Co . Inc., Koch 

Slippers 1.13 

Vannah Lithograph Co., Diplomas . . . 40.50 

Robert S. Osterhout, Graduation Pro- 
grams and Tickets 9.75 

148.76 

Total Expended $45398.26 

Total Unexpended Balance $1.74 



—158- 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT 



To the School Committee and Voters of Acton: 

I hereby submit my second annual report as superintendent 
of schools and principal of the high school (grades 7-12), cov- 
ering the period Jan, 1, 1936 to Jan. 1, 1937. The separate re- 
ports of the supervisors or special teachers of music, drawing, 
physical exercise, and manual and domestic arts will be in- 
corporated; the reports of the school physician and school nurse 
follow. 

I. School Costs 

1. The appropriation for 1936 was $46,000.00, which was 
S2500 more than 1935, in order to improve bus transportation 
and secure needed repairs and equipment. This figure is only 
S420.00 more than the average appropriation for the five years 
1926-1930, just before the real depression. The excellent re- 
sults from transportation alone amply justify the dift^erence. 

2. The real per capita cost of the 509 students enrolled on 
October 31, 1936 was approximately S76.90; that for the av- 
erage enrollment of 490 in the years 1926-1930, 877.60. In se- 
curing these costs, the money returned to the town has been 
subtracted from the annual appropriation. 

In view of the above facts, the request for at least S46,- 
000.00 in 1937 is reasonable. 

II. Maintenance and Repairs 

As much as possible has been done in making repairs of im- 
mediate necessity, in replacing worn equipment, and in securing 
new equipment. 

In all the schools, old shades have been replaced, blackboards 
cleaned, flue pipes in the basement repaired, and old unservice- 
able textbooks exchanged or discarded, making almost complete 
standardization in arithmetic, reading, and geography. 

In the high school, the fan radiator was completely renovated, 
the roof thoroughly repaired, 30 windows and one door weath- 
erstripped, the window sills and the fire-escapes partially paint- 
ed, the electric clock changed over from batteries to transform- 
er, one old gas stove in the Domestic Arts room and the old 



— ISO- 
mimeograph machine in the Typewriting Room replaced, 15 
new steel lockers installed, one motor lawn inower purchased, 
and several benches, tools, and machines added to the Manual 
Arts Department to increase its value as a general shop. 

In the Center School, the floor in the lower class room was 
entirely relaid, all the windows tightened, the cesspool and 
drain pipe cleaned out and repaired, the .furnace grates reno- 
vated, and large stones, rolled during the past ten years from 
the school to adjoining property, taken away. 

In the West School, the front lawn was much improved by 
the construction of dry wells, reseecling the ground, and repair 
of water spouts; also, the windows in the most exposed room 
were weatherstripped, and the old, obsolete furnace removed. 

III. Adjostments in the High School 

Several changes began in 1935 have been carried through, 
a few of which will be mentioned. 

1. Daily period schedule, resulting in two days with six 
periods of 51 minutes each for more supervised study, and three 
days with- seven periods with 44 minutes each, permitting one 
activity period in each for assemblies, home room activity, or- 
ganization meetings, the agricultural club, and extra physical 
exercise. 

2. A program of studies on the basis of six continuous 
3^ears, departmentalization and promotion by a point system. 
Two teachers handle all the English, two the commercial sub- 
jects, one the social studies, one the science, one the foreign 
languages, one most of the mathematics, one the domestic arts, 
and one the manual arts. 

3. An educational guidance policy to fit students into the 
proper courses and cut down failures. In attempting to carry 
out this, use is made of achievement and intelligence tests, in- 
tention blanks, elective blanks, and individual conferences with 
every student. Naturally, much remains to be done in this di- 
rection, but the bimonthly honor rolls show clear signs of im- 
provement over 1935 and the Exhibition Day in May revealed 
much achievement. Incidently, parents cannot be urged too 
strongly to m.ake more frequent personal contacts with the 
school and teachers to find out the real causes of failures, to 
check up daily home study, and to help improve regular at- 
tepdance. The report cards state as minimum requirements 



—160— 

for home study 30 minutes in grade 7, 60 in grade 8, 90 in grade 
9, and 120 or more in grades 10 to 12. The improvement in bus 
transportation has been largely responsible for reducing the 
cases of absence, in the first four months in the school years of 
1935 and 1936, from 1077 to 795, and of tardiness from 244 to 
63. Our average percent of attend/ance for 1935-1936 was 
91.11% for grades 1-6 and 92.39% for grades 7-12, which is 
probably slightly lower than the average for the state. 

4. Improvement of library facilities, whereby all 1075 ref- 
erence books have been catalogued by the Dewey system, the 
room opened every period for library reference work, and over 
20 good magazines regularly secured. Through the generosity 
of a few public-spirited citizens and the annual school commit- 
tee allowance, the purchase of useful books and magazines is 
assured. In view of the unequal library facilities in the three 
3ections of the town, a good school library is a worthy invest- 
ment. In this connection, several new supplementary reading 
books were secured for the elementary schools and old, worn- 
out books discarded. 

IV. Class of 1936 

This class graduated 30 members out of the original 53 who 
entered in September 1931, thus retaining 59% of original mem- 
bership, as against 47% for the class of 1935, and about 
60% commonly found in other towns and cities. Five are now 
in colleges (one in' Northeastern, one in Boston University, two 
in Gordon College, and one in Fitchburg State College) : five in 
business, nursing, and other vocational schools; eleven defiinite- 
ly at work in mills, factories, garages, stores, or offices; six in 
preparatory schools, four of whom are post-graduate students 
in Acton ; and three not definitely employed. In other words, 
53% are continuing formal education and 36% are engaged in 
gainful occupations. 

V. Agriculture 

The course in agriculture, started in 1935, has been much 
more effectively organized in 1936 under the supervision of Mr. 
George Erickson of the United States Extension Service and 
Mr. Frank Braman of the teaching force. There is a meeting 
every week, assigned problems, visiting lecturers from the State 
College at Amherst once a month, and regular diploma credit. 



—161— 

The 4-H work in the elementary schools is making satisfactory 
progress. In December, the Domestic Arts Department provid- 
ed supper in the high school for over forty adult 4-H leaders 
from several of the nearby towns, 

VL Changes in the Teaching Staff 

There were four changes and three additions in 1936. ' Miss 
Sutcliff, who resigned at the Center School, was replaced by 
Mr. Raymond Nicker son, a graduate of Bridge water State Col- 
lege; Mr. Greenman's place in the West School was taken by 
Mr. Charles Whitcomb, also a graduate of Bridgewater; Miss 
Douglass's place in the High School was filled by Mr. Green- 
man, and Mr. Richard Law succeeded Mr. Sutciiffe as music 
supervisor. Miss Helen Appleby was added as a substitute and 
then regular teacher at thej South School to relieve the crowded 
conditions in grades 1 and 2; Miss Eleanor Jones was made sup- 
ervisor of physical education for girls and Mr. Frank Braman 
supervisor of art. As a whole, the teaching staff is well quali- 
fied, earnest, and cooperative. In several cases, salaries ought 
to be increased. 

VII. Health 

The reports of the school physician, school nurse, and super- 
visor of physical exercise and athletics will show, I believe, that 
Acton is doing considerable for the improvement of the health 
of school children. Much more still needs to be done. In par- 
ticular, the audiometer tests for hearing indicated 29 cases 
needing attention; the eye tests, 26 cases; the examination of 
teeth, the unusually large number of 226 cases, or 45% of the 
total examined. Several of the defective eye cases have been 
rectified and the ear cases will rceive attention, but the condi- 
tion of teeth is very bad and needs immediate improvement. 
To remedy this serious difficulty, the school committee has per- 
mitted the Teachers Club to raise money for a dental clinic. 
All the teachers are cooperating wonderfully in producing a 
second play for the Dental Clinic Fund, which they hope to 
have augmented by private gifts. Through the eflforts, chiefly 
of the teachers, in presenting a play last April and the con- 
tributions of several local organizations, a Milk Fund was start- 
ed. 407 quarts of free milk were provided for certain children 
in 1936. 



—162— 

Compulsory physical exercise for all girls and boys is now 
carried on regularly under the supervision of Miss Eleanor 
Jones, Mr. Robert Dolan, and Mr. Richard Greenman, In ad- 
dition, ventilation and room temperature are being checked 
more carefully than ever. 

Vlil. Consolidated Elementary School 

The greatest need in the school system of Acton now is the 
consolidation of all the first six grades into one building, some- 
where near the high school. At the risk of repeating what has 
been written again and again in the annual reports of the two 
previous superintendents, I shall briefly indicate the advantages. 

1. One grade per room instead of two. 

2. A special class for the mentally retarded, of whom the 
examinations by the State Department of Mental Diseases in 
Acton last May showed that there were over twenty pupils, one 
to three years or more retarded. 

8. Concentration of supplies and more efficient distribution 
of the same. 

4 Better opportunity for supervision of instruction by 
superintendent and principal, teaching only part time. 

5. Proper light, heat, and ventilation. 

6. A real playground under supervision and large inside play 
room for use in inclement weather. 

7. Arrangements in the building plan for the later addition 
of a large auditorium unit seating 500 persons, to be used by 
grades 1-6, grades 7-12, and town organizations. Such a unit 
could be shut off from the school and entered by side doors. It 
would have ample stage facilities and could be adapted to dra- 
matics, music, basketball, and general meetings. This might 
form the first step in the grouping of all the municipal buildings. 

8. Warm lunches at noon recess. 

9. Fireproof building. 

10, One full-time janitor. 

11. Considerable saving in expense of maintenance and op- 
eration. 

The present arrangement necessitates two grades per room, 
with an age span between the youngest and oldest children of 
from 5 to 6 years; with considerable variations in intelligence, 
ability, and achievement, of which the Metropolitan Tests gave 
ample evidence last May. 



-t163— 

The Center School is 65 years old, and the West and South 64. 
Painting, new floors, drainage, furniture, window sashes, and 
many other items need real attention. To continue to repair old 
buildings is not a good investment. The cost of operation and 
repairs of the three elementary schools during the last eleven 
years has been |11,196.65 more than the High School; the fuel, 
14,432.55 more; the janitor service, |8,956.13 more, making a 
per capita cost on these three items of $17.12 for elementary 
schools as against |13,54 for the High School. 

If a grant of 45 % of the construction cost could be secured 
from the Federal Government and bonds be issued on the re- 
maining 55% at the current low rate of 2^% (high school 
bonds are 4 % ) , the Town of Acton would secure the best oppor- 
tunity for a new school building it has ever had. 

Certainly the children in grades 1-6 deserve proportionately 
as much consideration as in grades 7-12. At present, they are 
not receiving it. 

IX- Reports of Supervisors and Special Teachers 

At my request, all the special teachers and supervisors, with 
the exception of the music supervisor, have given merely a 
brief summary of their work. This fact does not signify, by any 
means, that they have not accomplished many excellent results. 
Mr. Law, the music supervisor, was asked to write a longer re- 
port because he has a very definite purpose in mind, is well 
ojualified, and is trying to lay a solid foundation for a very im- 
portant activity. I hope that instruction in music will continue 
for some time without further interruption. 

1. Physical Education and Athletics — Girls 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

7th Grade Boys— 20. . 

Track Meet. 

Basketball tournament between three teams. 

7th, 8th, and 9th Grade Girls— 20-18. 
Exercises emphasizing posture. 
Small basketball tournament — ^two teams in each grade. 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Four Classes of 18, 19, 19, 16. 
Spring 1936— Volley Ball 20 girls. 
Tennis Tournament^ — 16 girls. 



—164—. 

Posture examinations — 687^^ compelled to take clinic for not 
attaining a ''B" grade. At the end of two, 25% more at- 
tained a ''B". 

Fall 1936— Hockey— 25 girls. 

First and second team games with Maynard. 
Basketball — 50 girls — extensive intramural contest with 
six teams participating— Varsity program of afternoon 
games in February. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Posture Day Contest to be repeated at the end of the year : 
South Acton — 1st place — average 86.73%. 
Acton Center — 2nd place — average 86.42%. 
West Acton — 3rd place — average 82.18%. 
Poor posture is due to malnutrition, poor sitting posture, im- 
proper clothing, carry^ing books, hands in the pocket. 

Values of Physical Education 

1. Health and good posture. 

2. Intellectual — knowledge and skill of the game. 

3. Recreational — learn how to enjoy a wholesome good time. 

4. Social — cooperate with others — be good sport, learn to 
win and lose graciously. 

Gradually introduce those sports that will carry over into 
later life as a hobby — such as tennis, archery, swimming, golf, 
riding, skating, skiing, etc. 

2. Athletics — Boys 

Baseball — 1936 

In this major varsity sport, 22 boys participated. The team 
won the Sudbury Valley League championship for the sec- 
ond consecutive year. 

Football — 1936 

The football team won five games and lost four this year. 
About 24 boys were active during the season. Not one ser- 
ious accident or injury visited the team, which was in ex- 
cellent physical condition. 

Basketball— 1936-1937 

With twenty-two boys coming out daily, the basketball team 
is developing well. Acton, although the smallest high school 
in the Lowell Surburban League, is right up at the top in 
victories. 



—165— 

Physical Training 

Every boy in the school who does not participate in any var- 
sity sport is given physical training. The essential funda- 
mentals of play are taught to them. 

Concluding Statement n 

The condition of athletics in Acton is very healthy. Three 
major sports are offered to the athletes here and they are 
supervised and coached by competent instructors. 

3. Domestic Arts 

7th Grade — Sewing, one period daily.— Use and care of sew- 
ing machine, care and repair of clothing, knowledge of funda- 
mental stitches, making of an apron, underwear, pajamas, and 
a simple dress. Personal hygiene, and spelling of sev/ing words. 

8th Grade — Cooking, two periods daily- — preparation of com- 
mon foods, dietary knowledge of foods, order of cleanliness. All 
foods prepared are served on the cafeteria table. Spelling of 
cooking words. 

9th Grade — Same as course given last year. 

10th and 11th — Home making, one period daily — building the 
home, furnishing and caring for it, training of children, bud- 
gets and good living habits, toward Family and Community. 

12th Grade — Same as course given last year. 

As Dean of Girls, 119 pupils were given first aid attention. 

The Cafeteria has the following report : 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1936 |24.37 

Total Sales for year |1,575.30 

Cost of supplies for cooking 

Sewing and replacement of dishes . . . |1,391.43 

Milk Supply , • 121.77 

Special lunches for teachers and pupils. . 41.48 

Flood ReHef 20.02 

Lost through theft : 13.96 

Cash on hand, December 31, 1936 11.01 



,599.67 ?1,599.67 



—166— 

4. Manual Arts 

We have had a very successful year, showing much progress. 
The department has worked at a minimum cost. There have 
been one power-driven Scroll Saw, made by Delta, added to our 
equipment; one power-driven Tool-Grinder, made by Lombard & 
Co.; and five sloyd benches, made at the Concord Reformatory. 
Some repair work about the school has been done by the students 
who are doing general shop work In doing this, they get practi- 
cal training and help to keep the expense of repairs at a mini- 
mum. An inventory of all tools in the Manual Art's rooms, on 
January 1, 1937, shows a total valuation of S339.48. 

5. Art 

Grades 1 and 2: Elementary drawing, using illustrations of 
reader stories as a basis. This type of lesson leads itself to 
free expression, the newest note in elementary drawing. This 
also is a partial correlation of drawing and reading. These 
grades have studied color, design and hand work. 

Grades 3 to 6: Elementary drawing, using correlated illus- 
trations of reading, history, and geography lessons as a basis. 

5. P. C. A. poster projects are again being enjoyed by these 
grades. A more extensive study has been made, this year, of 
color and design. 

Grades 7 to 12 : Progressive work in sketching, color 
schemes, furniture, history of costumes, and interior decoration. 
Poster, "Torch" covers, and Christmas cards have been designed. 
The girls in grades 11 and 12 have made an extensive study of 
the various types of personal coloration. 

6. Music 

"The course which I have planned for the Schools in the Town 
of Acton is based upon the state outline of technical matter to be 
used in the various grades. I have prepared schedules for each 
teacher covering her year's work and bringing the text book 
used into agreement with the technical principles presented. I 
feel sure that the music in the grades is making wholesome 
progress and is growing iiito something of the ideal set for it. 

Musical activities of the high school will be a continuation and 
expansion of those of the grade schools, with proper credit. 
Credit for outside work is now granted in several Massachusetts 
cities as well as for the school course. But where the music is 
confined to chorus singing during one period a week little is pos- 
sible to accomplish. 



—167— 

How much Algebra or History could be taught under the same 
condition? The problems of the changing voice, reading from 
the bass clef and other technical practice require the methods 
of ihe classroom, and are impossible in a general assembly. 
Such results as are obtained are largely through rote, and it is 
usual that at graduation an acceptable program is possible, and 
during the year a limited number of choruses are learned. 

The junior high school places its music program on the same 
basis as the High School i. e., one recitation a week, a result to 
be regretted. Normally, the seventh and eighth grades^ having 
been thoroughly grounded during the six preceding grades in the 
technical principles of music reading, develop a high degree of 
skill in part singing and interpretation. It means intense con- 
centration and infrequent practice for children of this age, and 
tlicy accomplish as a rule far superior results than the older 
high school chorus, with its limited practice. To lose this frui- 
tion of the earlier grades is a grave mistake. 

The high school has an orchestra consisting of two pianists, 
four violins, three trumpets, one clarinet, one trombone. Though 
limited in variety and number of instruments, it is doing credi- 
table work and will be heard later." 
Conclusion 

I trust that this report will not prove too long. The year has 
been so full of interest that it is difficult for me to select and 
omit. I am very grateful to the school committee, teachers,, and 
citizens for their many acts of kindness and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. HALL, Siipt„ 



—Ids- 



report OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Walter F. Hall, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Acton, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as School Physician. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed on October 
25th, 1936, and details of the same will be found in the nurse's 
report. 

May 11, 12 and 13 w^e held our pre-school clinic. 

May and June we held our clinics for diphtheria immuniza- 
tion, and toxoid was used in place of toxin anti-toxin, which we 
have formerly used, for this purpose. 

During- the year, students participating in football, basketball, 
and hockey have had examinations especially for heart action 
during' rest and increased exercise. 

We have had no serious outbreaks of any of the contagious 
diseases, and the health of our school population at the present 
time is very good. 

I feel that our physical training is doing much for the im- 
provement of the condition of the students, and they seem to 
take pride in being physically fit, which gives me a great deal of 

satisfaction. 

Again I vdsh to thank the Superintendent, teachers, nurse and 
the townspeople for their co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MA YELL, M. D. 



.—169— 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Walter Hall 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir : - " 

I herewith submit my report as School Nurse for year ending 
December 31, 1936. Included as a part of this report is that of 
your former nurse, Mrs. Lillian F. Taylor, whose good work I 
shall endeavor to continue. 

The general program of inspections and examinations made 
by the nurse has been done in an effort to detect beginning ill- 
ness, of times contagious ; and to stimulate an interest in personal 
hygiene and public health. It also helps the teacher in her ef- 
forts to establish standards of cleanliness, which result in bet- 
ter health and more regular school attendance. 

Physical examination of all school children was made by 

school physician in September and October. 

r of pupils examined 501 

Number of pupils with poor teeth 226 

of pupils enlarged tonsils 61 

of pupils swollen glands , . 145 

Number of pupils heart irregularities 46 

of pupils malnutrition ■ 17 

of pupils faulty posture 39 

The need for dental work was very apparent in the examina- 
tions. In some cases none had ever been done, in others none for 
quite a few years. It is hoped that some project may be devel- 
oped to care for those children whose teeth are a health menace. 

We have, every year a Clinic, at which time children may be 
immunized against Diphtheria. This Clinic was held in April. 

Number of children having Schick test 80 

Number of children having positive reaction 46 




—170—. 

.: The children who reacted positively, received three doses of 
Toxoid at weekly intervals. This clinic is open to pre-school 
children. This is a group who are most in need of protection 
from Diphtheria. 

' The School Clinic formerly called the Chadwick Chnic was 
held in September. The increasing number of requests fron:, 
parents that their children have the test, which will show any 
exposure to Tuberculosis, was very gratifying. It is a privilege 
to get, at no expense to the parent, information which me^ns so 
much to the future health of the child. 

School population — grades 7-9-11 132 

Children tested 74 

% tested 56.1 

Children reacting to test 15 

Children X-rayed 15 

All X-rays were negative, so no further examinations were re- 
quired. 

It was possible to send two girls to the Southwestern Middle- 
sex Health Association Camp at Bolton for a period of four 
weeks each, during the summer. This Camp is maintained by 
sale of seals, every fall, and its purpose is to build strong bodies 
by proper diet and a life in the open. 

The Audiometer was recently used to test hearing in Grades 
4 through high school. There is a definite proof in 29 cases of 
the value it will prove to be to those pupils who were handi- 
capped by a definite hearing loss. 

The eyesight examinations given in all the giades, in doubt- 
ful cases-twice, showed definitely that 26 pupils need prompt 
attention. 

The Pre-school clinic is a very definite part of a child's prepa- 
ration for school. In June, 30 children were examined by the 
school physician. Conditions requiring attention can then be 
taken care of during summer. 

Daily visits were made to the schools when possible and sani- 
tary inspections made. 



—171— 

Number of pupil inspections 1204 

Simple dressings 301 

Pupils excluded — symptoms contagion 34 

Pupils taken home ill 20 

Pupils taken to Dentist 16 

Pupils taken to Eye Specialist 11 

Pupils tal^en to Clinic 14 

I wish to express my appreciation for the splendid support 
received from school faculty and parents, during this my first 
year, as Public Health Nurse of Acton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENiEVIEVE J. CREELEY,, R. N. 



—172- 



GRADUATES OF 1936 



Clarence Edward Braman ^Barbara Ruth Jenks 

*Eileen Frances Callanan Frederick Francis Lawrence 

Robert Staniy Converse *Alice Isabelle Leveroni 

* Mildred Rosalia Coolidge Albert Norman MacDougall 

Leo Clement Cunningham, Jr. *Alicia Louise Middleton 
Bernice Louise Downie Arlene Kimball Mills 

Sidney Porter Durkee * George Edward Moore 

Emma Thornton Fairbanks Robert Thornton Moore 
Donald Oliver Feltus Ralph Waldo Parker, Jr. 

Robert A. Frazier John Pratt 

Thomas Charles Gallagher, Jr. Jeanette Isabel Rifford 
Earl Frank Hayward Francis David Roche 

Olive Ellen Hill Marjorie Feltus Smith 

William Dunlop Holland Gordon Parker Tate 

Doreen Frances Jeffries *L-ene Frances White 

*Honor Students 
Student Essays: 

First Honors : Irene White — "Is the Present Method of Deal- 
ing with Juvenile Delinquency Satisfactory?" — A Defense. 

Second Honors: Barbara Jenks — "Is the Present Method of 
Dealing with Juvenile Delinquency Satisfactory'^?" — A Crit- 
cism, 

Aw^ards During Year : 

Doreen F. Jeffries: Carlos B. Clark Acton History Award. 
Alice I. Leveroni, Frederick F. Lawrence: American Leg- 
ion Awards for best rank in Scholarship, Loyalty, and 
Achievement (Edwards-Quimby Post). 

Barbara R. Jenks : Washington-Franklin Medal for best rec- 
ord in American History (Massachusetts Society of Sons 
of the American Revolution). 



INDEX 



Page 

Accountant 94 

Appointments Made by Selectmen 1936 4 

Assessors' Report 67 

Auditor 137 

Board of Health . . . , 75 

Cemetery Commissioners , 4G 

Dog Officer 64 

Elizabeth White Fund Report 137 

Finance Committee . 12 

Fire Department - 72 

Forest Warden 73 

Goodnow Fund 77 

Inspector of Animals 64 

Jury List 45 

Librarian's Report 83 

Middlesex County Extension Service . 78 

Old Age Assistance 16 

Police Department 60 

Presidential Election, Record of . 29 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 81 

Selectmen's Report = 14 

Superintendent of Moth Control 65 

Superintendent of Streets . 66 

Tax Collector 68 

Town Clerk 33 

Births 34 

Marriages 36 

Deaths 39 

Non-Resident Burials 40 

Dog Licenses , 41 

Town Meetings: 

Annual Meeting 17 

Special Town Meeting, October 21, 1936 27 

Town Nurse 76 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 7 



Page 

Treasurer 126 

Elizabeth White Fund . 129 

Cemetery Funds 130 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 132 

Cemetery Surplus Fund 132 

Firemen's Relief Fund 133 

Wilde Memorial Library Fund 133 

Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 134 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 134 

Tree Warden 74 

Welfare Department 15 

WFA Sewing Project 16 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Committee • 143 

Comparison of Cost 144 

Estimates for 1937 145 

Graduates, 1936 172 

Organization 140 

Paid for Support, 1936 148 

School Nurse 169 

School Physician 168 

School Superintendent 158 

Standing Rules 141 

Summary of Expenses 147 

Teachers in Service 142 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 



1937 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



everaJ 




s 



.j't 



OF THE 




F ACTON 

SSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Endisig December 31 




— 3— 

Town Officers, 1937 



Moderator 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

Ralph W. Piper Term expires 1938 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1939 

Raymond F. Durkee Term expires 1940 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Albert F. Durkee Term expires 1938 

Henry L. Haynes Term expires 1939 

Warren H. Jones Term expires 1940 

Collector of Taxes 
Charles A. Durkee 

Tree Warden 
James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Raymond L. Hatch Term expires 1938 

Carl E. Backman Term expires 1939 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1940 

Constables 

George A. Braman Charles A. Durkee 

Michael Foley Norman L. Perkins 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Fred W. Green Term expires 1938 

Wendell F. Davis Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 



— 4— 

School Committee 

Samuel E. Knowlton Term expires 1938 

Lulu L. Clark Term expires 1938 

Avis Howe Term expires 1939 

Randall N. Woodworth Term expires 1939 

Louisa N. Wood . Term expires 1940 

Everett N. Montague Term expires 1940 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1938 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 

Board of Health 

^Raymond F. Durkee Term expires 1938 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1939 

O. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1940 

**Lillian F. Taylor Term expires 1938 

* Resigned 
** Appointed to replace 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Warren H. Jones Term expires 1938 

Waldd E. Whitcomb Term expires 1939 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1940 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1938 

H, Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1939 

A. N. Hederstedt Term expires 1940 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1938 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1939 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1940 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1938 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 



— 5— 
Appointments Made by Selectmen— 1937 



Finance Committee 

Murray Brown William T. Merriam 

Alfred W. Davis Webster S. Blanchard 

Alden C. Flagg Howard J. Billings 

Superintendent of Streets 
A. H. Perkins 

Town Accountant 
Howard L. Jones Term expires 1938 

Registrars of Voters 

Daniel W. Sheehan . Term expires 1939 

*Edwin A. Phelan Term expires 1940 

Arthur Lee Term expires 1938 

Horace F. Tuttle '. Ex-Officio 

**Walter L. O'Neil 
* deceased 
** appointed to replace 



Precinct I 
Warden — ^James W. Coughlin 
Clerk — Arthur W. Wayne 
Inspector^ — Arthur F. Davis 
^Inspector — Harold F. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — George A. Murphy 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — S, E. Knowlton 
Deputy Inspector^ — Leo F. McCarthy 
**Inspector — Timothy Condon 
***Inspector — Paul G. Coughlin 

Precinct II 
Warden — Theron Lowden 
xClerk — William F. Driscoll 
Inspector — Clare Milbery 
Inspector^ — Timothy Hennessey 
Deputy Warden — John G. Maguire 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas Murray 



Deputy Inspector — Frank A. Merriam 
Deputy Inspector^ — James Brown 
xxClerk — Thomas Yetman 

Precinct III 

Warden — Bertram D. Hail 
Clerk — Peter Duggan 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Frank McDonald 
Deputy Warden — Fred S. Whitcomb 
Deputy Clerk — Daniel J. Hurley 
Deputy Inspector — Harry Holt 
Deputy Inspector — John J. Duggan 
X Resigned 
XX Appointed to replace x 
* Deceased 
** Appointed to replace * 
*** Appointed to replace ** 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 

Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Clare Milbery 

Superintendent of Town Forest 
Charles A. Durkee 



—7~ 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Bertram D. Hall George H. Reed 

Charles E. Smith 



Michael Foley 



Field Drivers 



Norman Perkins 



George A. Braman 



Superintendent of Moth Work 
James J. Knight 



George A. Braman 



Police Officers 
Michael Foley, Chief 

Norman Perkins 

Burial Agent 
Charles A. Durkee 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 



C. A. Durkee 



George H. Reed 
William Braman 
A. W. Davis 
F. D. Harrington 
M. B. Ferber 
Phillip Newell 
Daniel MacMillan 
Albert S. Braman 



Public Weighers 

Alfred Davis, Jr. 
W. H. Soar 
G. Howard Reed 
W. H. Francis Davis 
Thomas Hearon 
Fred Burke 
Fred Stone 
Clarence E. Braman 



— 9- 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said County, 
Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are 
hereby directed to notify the legal voters in said town of Acton, 
qualified to vote at town meetings for the transaction of town af- 
%irs. to meet in their respective precincts, to wit : 
Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 
at 12 o'clock, noon, Monday, the seventh day of March, 1938, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least before 
the seventh day of March. 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following town 
officers : Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of taxes, 
one selectman for three years ; one assessor for three years ; one 
member of the board of public welfare for three years; four 
constables for one year; one cemetery commissioner for three 
years, two members of the school committee for three years, one 
member of the board of health for three years, one trustee Me- 
morial Library for three years, and a tree warden. 



—10^ 

_The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 8 o'clock 
p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Commonwealth 
to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, as aforesaid, 
to meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton on Monday, the four- 
teenth day of March, at 7 o'clock p. m., then and there to act 
on the following articles : 

Article 1. To choose ail necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any commit- 
tees chosen at any previous meeting that have not already re- 
ported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of mone^^ the town v/iil appropri- 
ate to defray the necessary and^ usual expenses of the several 
departments of the town and determine hovv the same shall be 
raised. 

Article 5 To see what sum of money the town will raise for 
the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see what sum of money the town will raise and 
appropriate for the maintenance of the Are department, or vote 
anything thereon. 

Article 7 To see if the town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix a price thereon 

Article 8 To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
to insure the employees of the tovvm or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town will appro- 
priates for the payment of premiums on the treasurer's and col- 
lector's bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1938, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 



I 



—li- 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse, and appropriate a sum of money for the mainten- 
ance of same. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to accept Chapter 77, 
Acts of 1937; an act providing for absent voting at regular town 
elections. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $1,500.00 more or less, to drain and repair the 
road known as Central Street, in West Acton, beginning at its 
intersection with Massachusetts Avenue, thence northerly to or 
near the residence of Millard J. Handley, or act anything there- 
on. 

Article 14 To see what action the town will take to meet the 
assessment of $1,543.30 heretofore made on it for the purpose of 
paying its share of the cost of making alterations and construct- 
ing additions in and to the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital under Chapter 417 of the Acts of 1935, as amended by 
Chapter 205 of the Acts of 1937 ; to see whether the town will 
vote to appropriate all or any portion of said assessment and to 
raise the amount so appropriated in whole or in part in this 
year's tax levy or to transfer such amount in whole or in part 
from any available funds; to see whether the town will vote to 
appropriate all or any portion of said assessment and to borrow 
the amount so appropriated on bonds or notes of the town ; to see 
whether the town will elect that all or any portion of said assess- 
ment shall be funded through the issue of bonds or notes of the 
County of Middlesex as authorized by said Chapter 417, as 
amended ; in case the town shall elect to fund under said Chapter 
417, to see vv^hether the town will elect that the assessments to 
be hereafter made upon it on account of any such funding loan 
shall be payable by it over the maximum permitted term of 
fifteen years or over a lesser period ; to see whether the town will 
vote to direct the Tovv^n Clerk to file with the Middlesex County 
Commissioners promptly, and in any event not later than April 
15, 1938, an election to fund all or any portion of the assessment 
already made upon it as aforesaid ; and to take any action in con- 
nection with the matters contained in this article. 



—12— 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, from 
the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton ; said money to 
be used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted by 
the State or County, or both, for this purpose ; or take any other 
action in relation thereto. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $200.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay the I 
expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reimbursed 
for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the specific repairs and widenings of 
School Street, South Acton; said money to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or County, 
or both, for this purpose; or take any other action in relation 
thereto. 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,400.00 or any other sum for the suppression of 
brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,200.00 or any other sum for the care of shade trees or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for Work Relief or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of One hundred dollars ($100.00) for the redemption of tax 
titles held by the town. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, the 
town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, and repair 
of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General 
Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto 
and including Chapter 400, Section 25G. (6) (a) of the Acts of 
1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 



—13— 

Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $550.00 or any other sum to purchase new fire hose. 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate a 
sum of money to repair the Acton Center fire house or vote any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate a 
sum of money to repair the South Acton fire house or vote any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to increase the salar- 
ies paid to the members of the Board of Selectmen to the follow- 
ing figures : the chairman — $300.00, the other members, — S200.00 
a year. To do or act thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to investigate all cases presented by property ovN^n- 
ers who claim to have been exempt from two thousand dollars of 
taxation on their property during the years 1936 and 1937, under 
the provisions of paragraph 17, section 5, of Chapter 59 of the 
General Laws; and to authorize the refund, on order of the 
Board, of such exempt taxes to those v/ho have paid their tax 
bills; and to pay the tax collector, (v^ithout commission) , if those 
tax bills that have not been paid by the recipients, in all cases 
where the exemption is clearly shown; to do or act thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the tov/n will appropriate a sum of 
money or act anything thereon to put in a catch basin or suitable 

drain to take care of the water flowing down off the hill from the 
Curley place opposite the residence of E. S. Cooper on Arlington 
Street, in West Acton. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money sufficient to provide proper police protec- 
tion at Quimby Square, South Acton, after the noon and after- 
noon dismissals of the South Acton Elementary School. 

Article 30. To see what money the town will appropriate for 
necessary repair of school buildings. 

Article 31. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to purchase one or more trucks for the Street Department, 
or act anything thereon. 



—14— 

Article 32. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the repair of Nagog Hill Road, or act anything there- 
on. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to expend a sum not 
to exceed $100.00 for the purpose of having appraised the town 
buildings and their contents, submitting same to the Massachu- 
setts Rating and Inspection Bureau so that a blanket insurance 
rate may be established or act anything thereon. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to accept the gift of 
the Jones Community Field at South Acton as an athletic field 
and maintain same or act anything thereon. 

Article 35. To see if the town will appropriate $300.00 or any 
other sum, to provide for the transportation and circulation of 
books of the Memorial Library, fcr South and West Acton to be 
expended under the direction of the library trustees. 

Article 36. To see if the town will vote to adopt the following 
Proposed Zoning Laws or act anything thereon : 

PROPOSED ZONING BY-LAWS 

of the 

Town cf Acton 



PREAMBLE 
The purposes of this by-law are tO' promote the health, safety, convenience 
and welfare, and to regulate the use of land and buildings for trade, industry, 
residence or other purposes 

ARTICLE I 
SECTION 1.— ESTABLISHMENT OF DISTRICTS, 

To carry out the purposes as set forth in the preamble toi this by-law, the 
use of land, and buildings in the town of Acton are hereby restricted and reg- 
ulated as hereinafter provided. 

SECTION 2.— DISTRICTS. 

The Town of Acton is hereby divided into four classes of districts to be 
known as follows: 

1. Single residence districts; 

2. General residence districts; 

3. Business districts; 

4. Industrial districts: 

as shown on a map which accompanies this by-law, entitled "Zoning Map 
of the Town of Acton," on file in the office of the town clerk, which map with 
all the boundary Lines and designations thereon, is hereby made a part of this 
by-law. 



—15— 

In such districts new buildings or structures, and alterations, enlargements 
or extensions of existing buildings or structures, may be designed, arranged 
and/or constructed, and land, buildings or structure, or parts thereof, may be 
used as specified for each type of district in Sections 3, 4, 5 and 6. No other 
uses shall bs permitted in such districts. 

SECTION 3— SINGLE RESIDENCE DISTRICTS. 
In a single residence district — 

(a) Use: Except as otherwise provided herein no building or premises shall 
be erected, altered or used except for one or more of the following uses. 

1. Single-family detached dwelling, and farm buildings: 

2. Church 

3. Educational use 

4. Farm, garden, or nursery, including the sale of farm products grown in 
the town and the major portion of which are grown on the premises, 
but excluding any use injurious, noxious, or offensive to the neighbor- 
hood ; 

5. Any existing large single residence which has become uneconomical to 
maintain as such, may be changed to a two family residence; 

6. Accessory use customarily incident to any of the above uses. 

(a) Side Yards: There shall be o^n each side of every building except a 
building of accessory use a side yard having a minimum width of ten feet. 

(b) Front Yards: There shall be in front of every building a front yard 
having a minimum depth of 30 feet, provided that the building does not pro- 
ject beyo'nd the average front line of adjacent buildings, when, it shall be on 
the average line. 

SECTION 4.— GENERAL RESIDENCE DISTRICTS. 
In a general residence district — 

(a) Use: Except as otherwise provided herein no building or premises 
shall be erected, altered, or used except for one or more of the following uses: 

1. All uses as in Single Residence District; 

2. Detached or pair of semi-detached dwellings for not more than four fam- 
ilies in all; 

3. Church; 

4. Telephone exchange, provided that there is no service yard; 

5. Accessory use customarily incident to any of the above uses. The term 
"accessory use" in this and the previous section shall not include any 
use injurious, noxious, or offensive to the neighborhood. 

(b) Side Yards: There shall be on each side of every building or pair of 
semi-detached buildings except a building of accessory use a side yard having 
a minimum width of eight feet. 

SECTION 5.— BUSINESS DISTRICTS. 

In a business district — 

(a) Use: Except as otherwise provided herehi no building or premises 
shall be erected, altered, or used for any use prohibited in an industrial dis- 
trict; for any use injurious, noxious, or offensive to a neighborhood by reason 



—16— 

of the emission of odor, fumes, dust, smoke, vibration or noise, or other cause, 
or for any use except one or more of the following: 

1. Any use permitted in a general residence district: 

2. Dwelling, including apartment house or tenement house and hotel; 

3. Bank or ofSce; 

4. Place of amusement or assembly; 

5. Public building; 

6. Any other retail business or service not involving manufacture on the 
premises except of products the major porticn of which are to be sold 
at retail by the manufacturer to the consumer; and provided further 
that not more than five operatives shall be employed in such manu- 
facture. 

(b) Side Yards: Where a side yard for a dwelling is provided it shall 
have a minimum width oX eight feet. 

(c) Unless otherwise shown on zoning map, business zone shall extend 
fifty feet on each side and one hundred feet to the rear of existing build- 
ings at the time of adoption of these laws. 

SECTION 6.— INDUSTRIAL DISTRICTS. 
In an industrial district — 

(a) Use: Except as otherwise provided herein no building or premises 
shall be erected, altered or used except for one or more of the building uses; 

1, Any use or purpose which is hereby authorizd or designated in the Gen- 
eral Residence Districts or Business Districts unless prohibited by law. 

2. Any industrial trade, manufacturing for conunercial or other purpose 
provided that the Board of Appeals rules that it would not be obnoxious, 
offensive or injurious to the neighborhood by vibration, smoke, gas, 
fumes, odors, dust or other objectionable features or of danger to the 
neighborhood through fire, explosion or any other cause. 

SECTION 7.— NON-CONFORMING USES. 

(a) Any lawful building or use of a building or premises or part thereof 
existing at the time of the adoption of this by-law or any amendment thereto 
may be continued, although such building or use does not conform to the 
above provisions hereof. Such use may be changed or if in a par: of a build- || 
ing or premises designed or intended for such use may be extended throughout 
such building or premises, provided in each case no structural alterations 
are hereafter made therein, except those required by law, by-law, or regula- 
tion, and provided that the Board of Appeals shall rule that such changed 
or extended use is not substantially more detrimental or injurious to the 
neighborhood. 

SECTION 8.— OVER-NIGHT CAMPS. 

(a) Over-night camps, and tent or trailer camps, so-called, may be estab- 
ished in any district; provided a permit therefor is granted by the Board of 
Appeal, but no permit shall be granted for over-night, tent or trailer camps 
if the same are to be located within four hundred feet of any dwelling house. 
All regulations of the same shall be under the control of the Board of Health. 



—17— 

SECTION 9.— CONTINUATION OF CONCORD BY-PASS. 

(a) The proposed State Road and continuation of the Concord By-Pass 
known as the Cambridge Turnpii^e shall be zoned according to the present 
requirements for single resident districts, and there shall be additional re- 
quir8m.ents as provided in the following regulations: 

1. No building or structure shall be erected within fifty feet of the nearer 
line of the taking for said Turnpike, and the minimum frontage of a lot 

upon said Turnpike shall be 100 feet. 

2. That the Board of Appeal m.ay in cases v/here lots in single or joint 
ownership of record at the time these by-laws are adopted are unable to 
comply with any of the requirements of these by-laws, make special 
exceptions to the terms of these by-laws in harmony to their general 
purposes and intent and in accordance with the general rules therein 
contained. 

SECTION 10.— BILL BOARDS AND SIGN BOARDS. 

In the residential zones no advertising sign or bill board shall be erected on 
the property along the town highways except those advertising a man's busi- 
ness, or profession, real estate sign or' sale of farm products, and then the 
sign shall be no larger than two feet by six feet or six square feet in area. 

SECTION 11.— BOARD OP APPEAL. 

(a) When this by-law becomes effective the Board of Selectmen shall 
appoint a Board of Appeal to consist of three members, the first appoint- 
ments to be for terms of one, two and three years, and thereafter for three 
years. 

SECTION 12.— ENFORCEZvlENT AND' PENALTIES. 

(a) If the Board of Appeal shall be informed or have reason to believe that 
any provision of this by-law is being or is about to be violated, it shall make 
an investigation and if it finds any violation it shall give immediate notice 
in writing to the owner or his duly authorized agent and to the occupant of 
the premises. If after such notice said violation continues the Board of Appeal 
shall forthwith revoke any permit issued in connection with the premises 
and shall enter complaint before the Fourth District Court of Eastern Mid- 
dlesex or any other manner provided by law. 

SECTION 13.— AMENDMENTS. 

The Board of Appeal, or the Board of Selectmen upon its own initiative 
upon petition of ten citizens, shall hold public hearings, public notices of 
which shall be given for the consideration of any amendments to the zoning 
map or these by-laws, and report to a Town Meeting its recommendations as 
to what action shall be taken. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof seven days at least before the time of said meeting 
as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 



—18— 

doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the time of meeting 
as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this twenty-sixth day of Jan- 
uary, 1938. 

A true copy. Attest : 

RALPH W. PIPER, 

JAMES E. KINSLEY, 

RAYMOND F. DURKEE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Constable of Acton 



—19— 



Report of Finance Committee 



Your committee on Finance respectfully submits the follow- 
ing recommendations for the ensuing year. 

Roads, General maintenance $12,000.00 

Schools 47,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,500.00 

Memorial Library, books 200.00 

Memorial Library, current expenses 1,000.00 

Memorial Library, books 200.00 

Hydrant Service 3,128.00 

General Government 6,000.00 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500.00 

Cemeteries 1,300.00 

Military Aid 200.00 

State Aid 800.00 

Soldier Relief 1,500.00 

Police Department 2,500.00 

Board of Health 1,500.00 

Public Welfare 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children' 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,000.00 

Snow removal, estimate 3,500.00 

Care of Shade trees. Article 19 ... 700.00 

Unclassified , . 400.00 

Bonds, High School and Fire truck . 5,500.00 

Interest on Bonds 760.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 300.00 

Memorial Day 275.00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Gypsy Moth Work. Article 18 1,200.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.00 

Treasurer's, Collector's and Town 

Clerk's Bonds 236.00 

Public Health Nurse, salary. Arti- 
cle 11 2,000.00 



—20— 

Public Health Nurse, expenses. Ar- 
ticle 11 200.00 

County Hospital, maintenance. Ar- 
ticle 22 1,011.55 

County Hospital, alterations, con- 
struction 1,543.30 

Fire Department, new hose. Article 

23 550.00 

Expenses of Dog Officer. Article 16 200.00 

Total $126,603.85 

4 

Article 1. Recommend a salary of 1,000.00 for Collector of 
Taxes, allowing additional charge for postage incurred in the 
collection of taxes. 

Article 4. Recommend the transfer from machinery fund 
the sum of $300.00 to the machinery account 

Article 13. Recommend no action. 

Article 15. Recommend the appropriation of $4,000.00 for 
this work. 

Article 17. Recommend passing over this article. 

Article 19 Recommend the increase in appropriation of 
$200.00 to be used for setting out new trees. 

Article 20. Recom^mend no action. 

Article 21. Recommend the appropriation of $100.00. 

Article 24 and 25. Recommend the expense of repairing Ac- 
ton Centre and South Acton Fire houses be taken from Build- 
ings and Grounds account. | 

Article 26. Recommend the Town consider an expense ac- 
count for the Selectmen in addition to their present salary, 
rather than raising their salaries this year. 

Article 28. Recommend no action. 

Article 29. Recommend no action. 



.._,>! 



—21— 

Article 30. Recommend appropriating the sum of $3,000.00 
for repairs on School buildings. 

Article 31. Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,000.00 
for the purchase of a new truck for Town. 

Article 32. Recommend no action. 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $2,000.00 
Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 
Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,300.00 
for Cemeteries, $800.00 to be raised and $500.00 
transferred from Cemetery Land Fund. 

Precinct 1. Murray Brown, Alden C. Flagg. 
Precinct 2. Howard J. Billings, William T. Merriam. 
Precinct 8. Webster S. Blanchard, Alfred W. Davis. 



—22— 



Selectmen's Report 



We submit, herewith, the reports of the various departments 
of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1937, also, all of 
the actions under the different articles voted at the last annual 
Town Meeting and the Special Town Meetings. 

During the year of 1936, it was impossible to complete all of 
the reconstruction work on flood damaged streets and bridges 
and still keep within the Annual Town Meeting Appropriations. 
The work started on the River Street bridge, under a Federal 
Flood Project in the fall of 1936, was finished in 1937. The 
Town's share was to be approximately 1/24 of the cost. 

High Street, just north of the so-called Powder Mill Bridge, 
was also badly damaged by the flood. The State and County )| 
were asked to assist in defraying the expenses of this work. 
The engineering department of the County felt that a relocation 
and widening of the street at this point was much needed. The 
land necessary for this purpose was the property of the Powder 
Company. The officials were consulted and they agreed to give 
the land and the material necessary to make the fill. At this' i| 
time, we wish to thank: the officials of the Powder Company 
for the very fine gift and their excellent spirit of co-operation. 

A ten foot arch was placed in the canal beneath the fill to 
take care of the surplus water. The work is completed except for 
a surface coat of gravel and oil which will not require a special! 
appropriation. ; 



The reconstruction of Main Street was started at the Car-^ 
lisle line and about 1200 feet were completed, requiring a heavy 
fill to bring it above water level in times of high water. We 
recommend the continuance of this construction on Main Street 
and specific widenings on School Street, South Acton. 

Traffic Rules and Orders were enacted by this board to regu- 
late the traffic upon the streets and highways of the Town. In 
order to have them legal and standardized, it was^ necessary to 
have them passed and approved by the Department of Public 
Works. By the passing of these ordinances, the members of 



1 



—23— 

the Police Department have the power and proper authority to 
enforce said regulations, thus making the streets and highways 
safer for travel. 

The street lighting has been improved by the addition of 18 
lights in various parts of the Town. Also an over-night light 
has been installed in each village, which helps in many ways. 
A new metal pole has been placed on the water fountain in Ac- 
ton Center, carrying a modern light, a great improvement over 
the wooden pole. 

We find the Town at the close of the year in very good finan- 
cial standing, and we wish to thank the different officers and 
committees of the Town for doing their part in keeping within 
their appropriations in carrying out their work in the different 
departments of the Town. 

RALPH W. PIPER, 

JAMES E. KINSLEY, 
RAYMOND F. DURKEE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



-24- 



Eeport of Zoning Committee 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen : 

We the zoning committee submit the proposed zoning by-laws 
for the Town of Acton as printed in the town warrant. 



While formulating the zoning by-laWs the zoning committee 
considered the following facts. 

1. The necessity of regulating the use of land along the pro- 
posed new highway through the town. 

2. To protect the real estate investments of the citizens it 
is necessary to zone the town into residential, business 
and industrial districts. 

3. To show different zones it became necessary to have a 
zoning map of the town. 

Your committee has simplified the proposed by-laws as much 
as possible to give the desired results. 

EVERETT N. MONTAGUE, 
FRANK A. MERRIAM, 
PORTER JENKS, 
HENRY E. TOLMAN, 
CHARLES E. DAVIS, 
ROBERT N. BOWEN, 

Zoning Committee. 



—25— 



During the year $3,986.70 was expended in aiding thirty-nine 
families representing one hundred and six persons. Of this 
amount, the Town of Acton has been reimbursed approximately 
$2,000 for cases having settlements in other cities and towns, 
etc. Seven families representing nineteen persons having Acton 
settlements were aided in other cities and towns. This makes 
a total of forty-six families representing one hundred and twen- 
ty-five persons that were aided during the year. 

Due to the improved conditions of the past year, our Welfare 
costs have been the lowest we have had for some time. Up to 
the latter part of 1937, in planning our Welfare appropriation 
for 1938, we had hoped that we again could make a substantial 
reduction. However, a so-called business recession set in and 
our Welfare load increased tremendously during December, 1937 
and January, 1938. Due to this and because of conditions over 
which we have no control this Board does not believe it advis- 
able to make any drastic reductions in the Welfare appropriation 
for 1938. 

At the time the Board of Public Welfare was created in Acton, 
the work of the department, although considerable, was such 
that it could be readily handled by its members on a part-time 
basis. However, the work of this department in the past two 
years has increased tremendously, which in the greater part 
is due to the coming of the Social Security Act, with its effect 
on our Old Age Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children load. 
Space will not allow going into detail, but because of this condi- 
tion, which we feel will continue to increase, this Board believes 
we should look forward, in the near future, to the appointment 
of an Agent to serve full time capacity under the supervision 
of the Board of Public Welfare. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
RAYMOND L. HATCH, 

Board of Public Welfare 



—26— 
Old Age Assistance Report 



We started the year 1937 with forty-eight cases. On Decem- 
ber 31, 1937, there were seventy cases receiving assistance. 
During the year, there were seven cases closed, five cases having 
Acton settlements were aided in other cities and towns. This is 
a total of eighty-two cases aided during the year. Of this num- 
ber nine have settlements in other cities and towns. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CARL E. BACKMAN, Supervisor, 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 



WPA Sewing Project 

The WPA Sewing project was continued in Actcn up to June, 
1937, giving continuous employment to an average of about 
eight women during this time. At this time the Government 
was considerably curtailing on WPA appropriations and in 
order to continue this project, it would have been necessary for 
the Town to assume all the expense, such as material, mainte- 
nance, etc. However, it was felt that conditions existing at this 
time did not warrant this expense. This project was, therefore, 
dropped. 

The distribution of food and clothing at the beginning of the 
year vv^as handled directly by this department, as in previous 
years. Early in the year, this distribution was taken over by 
the WPA Commissary at Lowell at a very small cost to the 
Town, with the advantage of having these commodities de- 
livered directly to the homes of the recipients. 

In December, 1937, we were notified that due to curtailment, 
this delivery would be discontinued and it was felt that due to 
the cost and the small quantity of commodities now available, 
this be discontinued in Acton altogether. However, if conditions 
warrant it, we can continue this at a later date. 

During the year, food to the amount of $1,242.93 and clothing 
to the amount of $3,480.77, making a total of $4,723.70 were dis- 
tributed in Acton. These were figures given out by the Com- 
missary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare (Sponsor) 



—27— 

Aid to Dependent Children Report 

(Formerly Mother's Aid) 



On January 1, 1937, there were two cases representing five 
persons receiving this aid. On December 31, 1937, there were 
seven cases representing nineteen persons receiving aid. This 
assistance now comes under the Social Security Act, the cost 
of which is distributed as follows: Federal Government, one- 
third; State, one-third; Town, one-third, regardlses of settle- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare 



Department of Public Welfare 



Appropriation recommended for 1938. 

Old Age Assistance $14,000.00 

Temporary Aid 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children . . 1,800.00 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare 



—28— 
Town Meetings 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 8, 1937 

Art. 1. To choose all necessary Town officers and commit- 
tees and fix salaries of all Town officers. 

Chose Charlotte Conant Trustee of the Elizabeth White 
Fund for three years. 

Chose Horace F. Tuttle Trustee of the Goodnow Fund for 
three years. 

Chose A. N. Hederstedt Trustee of the West Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Herbert Merriam Trustee of the Acton Firemen's Re- 
lief Fund for three years. 

Voted : To fix the salary of the tax collector at three-quarters 
of one per cent of the amount collected and to allow an additional 
charge for expense of postage incurred in the collection of taxes. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Selectmen be 
two hundred dollars per annum and the other members one hun- 
dred dollars each per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Public Welfare be one hundred and tw^enty-five dollars per an- 
num and the other members seventy-five dollars each per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hundred 
dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Accountant be four 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Assessors be nine hundred 
dollars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned as they 
may determine the said sum to include any salary of a clerk. 



—29— 

Voted: That the Selectmen be instructed to fix the salaries 
of all other Town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will accept the several reports 
of Town officers. 

Voted: That the reports of the several Town officers be ac- 
cepted. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the report of any committees 
chosen at any previous meeting who have not already reported. 

No action taken under this article. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the Town will appro- 
priate to defray the necessary and usual expenses of the several 
departments of the Town and determine how the same shall be 
raised. 

Under this article and other articles in the warrant it was 
voted to appropriate and raise by taxation for: 

Roads, general maintainance . $12,000 

Schools . 46,0'00 

Street Lighting 3,500 

Memorial Library, current expenses 900 

Memorial Library, for books 200 

Hydrant Service 3,128 

General Government 5,500 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500 

Cemeteries 800 

Mihtary Aid , . 200 

State Aid 500 

Soldiers' Relief 1,200 

Public Welfare 6,500 

Aid to Dependent Children 600 

Old Age Assistance 9,000 

Police Department 2,500 

Board of Health 1,000 

Snow Removel 1,200 

Care of Shade Trees 500 

Unclassified 400 

Bonds, High School and Fire Trucks 5,500 



00 

00 

00 



00 
00 
00 



00 
00 
00 
00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



—30— 

Interest on Bonds 1,000.00 

Interest in Revenue Loans 1,500.00 

Memorial Day 275.00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Fire Department, hose 250.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Forest Fires, hose 200.00 

Gypsy Moth Work 1,000.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.00 

Treasurer's and Collector's Bonds 250.00 

Public Health Nurse 2,200.00 

County Hospital Assessment 694.18 

Expenses of Dog Officer 200.00 

W. P. A. Projects 5,000.00 

High School Insurance 1,425.22 

High Street, reconstruction 1,000.00 

Main Street, reconstruction 2,500.00 

Road Machinery Account 300.00 

Reserve Fund from overlay surplus 1,000.00 

Fire Whistle, W. Acton from overlay surplus .... 1,500.00 

Cemeteries from Cemetery Land Fund 300.00 



$127,522.40 



Art. 5. To see what sum of money the Town will raise for 
the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
and seventy-five dollars to be expended under the direction of a 
committee consisting of the commander of the Isaac Davis Post, 
G. A. R., the commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the 
Finance Officer of Edwards-Quimby Post, Webster S. Blanchard, 
Howard J. Billings, Oliver D. Wood, Mrs. Nancy Chaffin and 
Mrs. Ellen E. Durkee. 

Art. 6. To see what action the Town will take in regard to 
the Collection of Taxes. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 7. To see what sum of money the Town will raise and 
appropriate for the maintainance of the Fire Department or 
vote anything thereon. 



—31— 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-eight 
hundred dollars. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix a price thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate five hundred dollars for fighting brush 
fires and that the price for labor be fixed at fifty cents per hour 
ifor firemen, sixty cents per hour for Deputy Forest Wardens, 
and seventy-five cents per hour for the Forest Warden. 

Art. 9. To see what action the Town will take toward the 
suppression of the brown-tail and gypsy moth. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of thirteen hundred dollars ($1,300.00) or any other sum 
I for the suppression of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act any- 
i thing thereon. 

Acting under the above articles jointly. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars ($1,000.00) 

Art. 10. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
to insure the employees of the Town or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will ap- 
propriate for the payment of premiums on the Treasurer's and 
Collector's bonds or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of two hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

Art. 12. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be- 
^ginning January 1, 1937, and to issue a note or notes therefor 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44 of General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the 



—32— 

Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1937, and to issue a note or notes therefor 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44 of the General Laws. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse and appropriate a sum of money for the maintain- 
ance of the same. 

Voted: To employ a public health nurse to be under the di- 
rection of the Board of Health and to appropriate twenty-two 
hundred dollars for the salary and maintenance of said nurse. 

Art. 14. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum sufficient 
to pay the County of Middlesex as required by lav/, the Town's 
share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair of the 
Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in accord- : 
ance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General Laws 
and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto or take 
any action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To appropriate the sum of S894.18 for said County ^ 
Hospital assessment. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town v/ill raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,200.00 or any other sum for the care of shade trees 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of five hundred dollars 

Art. 17. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Road , 
Machinery Account, to which shall be credited all receipts re- 
ceived for the use or rental of road machinery, the proceeds to 
be appropriated as voted by the Town for road machinery pur-^ 
poses, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Voted: To establish a Road Machinery Account to which I 
shall be credited all receipts received for the use or rental of i 
road machinery, the proceeds to be appropriated as voted by the i 
Town for road machinery purposes. j 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 



—33— 

of money to establish a Road Machinery Fund, for the purpose 
of purchasing, repairing and operating road machinery. 

Voted: To appropriate $300.00 for a Road Machinery Fund, 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, from 
the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton ; said money to 
be used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted by 
the State or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any 
other action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-live 
hundred dollars for the improvement of Main Street, from the 
Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton ; said money to be 
used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted by the 
State or County, or both, for this purpose. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
for W. P. A. work or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of five thousand 
dollars to finance W. P. A. work. 

Art. 21. To see what action the Town will take to purchase 
and install a fire whistle or other fire signal device for use at 
the West Acton Fire House, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate fifteen hundred dollars from the over- 
lay surplus to purchase and install a fire signal at West Acton. 

Art. 22. To see of the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of 1550.00, or any other sum to purchase new fire hose. 

Voted : To appropriate and raise the sum of |250.00 to pur- 
chase new fire hose. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of two hundred dollars for the use of the Treasurer, to 
pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The Town will be 
reimbursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate $200.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. 



—34— 

Art. 24. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for Insurance on the High School Building. 

Voted: To raise the sum of ?1,425.22. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the relocation and reconstruction of 
High Street at the Powder Mill Bridge, said money to be used 
in conjunction with any money which may be alloted by the 
State, County, or both, for this purpose, or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Voted. To raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars for the relocation and reconstruction of High Street at 
Powder Mill Bridge; said money to be used in conjunction with 
any money which may be alloted by the State, County, or both, 
for this purpose. 

Art. 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of financing the con- 
struction of a consolidated elementary school in the vicinity of 
Kelley's Corner and authorize and direct the Selectm.en to ac- 
cept, on behalf of the Town, an offer of the United States of 
America to aid in financing the construction of said project by 
making a grant of money to the Town ; and authorize a building 
committee to construct said project and contract with respect 
thereto; and authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow such sums as may be necessary to meet 
any appropriation made, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : To authorize the Moderator to appoint a committee of 
three members to join with the School Committee in an investi- 
gation of a proposed consolidated elementary school, such com- 
mittee to report to the voters of the Town at a later date. 

The Moderator appointed as a committee: Harold E. Clapp, 
Walter M. Cook and Edward L. Pendergast. 

Art. 27. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $200.00, or any other sum, to purchase new forest fire 
hose. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of |200.00. 



—35— 
Abstract of the Special Town Meeting held October 4, 1937 



Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of financing the construction 
of a consolidated elementary school in the vicinity of Kelly's 
Corner and authorize and direct the selectmen to accept on be- 
half of the town an offer of the United States of America to 
aid in financing the construction of said project by making a 
grant of money to the town; and authorize a building commit- 
tee to construct said project and contract with respect thereto, 
and authorize the treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen 
to borrow such sums as may be necessary to meet any appropri- 
ation made; or take any action relative thereto. 

The following motion was made and seconded: That there 
be raised and appropriated the sum of $100,000.00 for the pur- 
pose of acquiring land, by purchase or otherwise, for the con- 
structing of an Elementary Consolidated School and originally 
equipping and furnishing the same, in the vicinity of Kelly's 
Corner ; and to meet the appropriation that there be transferred 
from unappropriated revenue funds in the treasury the sum of 
$1,000.00 and the treasurer with the approval of the selectmen 
be and is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $60,000 under 
authority of Chapter 44 of the General Laws and to issue bonds 
or notes of the town therefor, said bonds} or notes to be payable 
in accordance with the provisions of said Chapter 44 so the 
whole loan shall be paid in not more than twenty years or at 
such earlier dates as the treasurer and selectmen may determine. 
All money received by way of grant from the Federal Govern- 
ment on account of this project shall be applied first to meet 
the cost of construction thereof and any balance shall be applied 
to the payment of the loan herein authorized. 

The selectmen are hereby authorized and directed to accept 
on behalf of the town an offer of the United States of America 
to aid in financing the construction of said project by making a 
grant of money to the town ; the building committee are author- 
ized to proceed with the construction of said project and to en- 
ter into all necessary and proper contracts and agreements in 
respect thereto, all subject to applicable Federal regulations; 



—36— 

and the selectmen and the building committee are authorized 
to do all other acts and things necessary or convenient for ob- 
taining said grant, for making said loan and for constructing 
said project. 

The motion was put to a vote and declared by the moderator 
lost or not carried. The result of thq vote being doubted a mo- 
tion v^as made and carried that the meeting proceed to vote on 
the motion by ballot, those in favor of the motion voting Yes, 
and those opposed No. 

The following persons were appointed and sworn by the 
moderator to act as tellers 

Arthur Freeze William Merriam 

G. Howard Reed Arthur Lee 

The tellers reported total number of ballots cast 229 

Voting Yes 128 

Voting No 98 

Blanks 3 

Art, 2. To see if the voters in town meeting will appoint 
the building committee with power to select a suitable site and 
appropriate $500 for necessary expenses. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee 
to prepare a set of building laws and report at the next annual 
town meeting or act anything thereon. 

A motion ''that the three selectmen and Mr. James P. Brown 
appoint two additional members, one from Precinct I and the 
other from Precinct 3 to join with them as a committee to draw 
up a set of building laws, and that $250 be raised and appropri- 
ated for their use." The motion did not prevail. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will pass an interim building law 
to read as follows : ''No dwelling shall be erected and occupied 
in the town of Acton without a building permit to be issued by 
the board of selectmen or their agent. The fee for said permits 
to be five dollars ($5.00) or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 



—37— 

Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee 
on zoning or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That a committee of six be appointed or chosen to 
prepare a set of zoning laws for the town of Acton and report 
at a date not later than the annual town meeting in March 
1938. 

Voted : To appropriate a sum not exceeding twenty-five dol- 
lars for the use of said committee. 

Robert M. Bowen Raymond F. Durkee 

James E. Kinsley Frank A. Merriam 

Webster S. Blanchard Howard J. Billings 
were chosen as the committee. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $300 for creosoting gypsy moth eggs clusters or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: That the selectmen transfer $300 from the reserve 
fund for creosoting gypsy moth eggs clusters. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the expenses of the Board of Health or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of $1500 for the expenses 
of the Board of Health for the current year. 

Proceedings of a Special Town Meeting Held November 1, 1937; 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of financing the construction 
of a consolidated elementary school in the vicinity of Kelly's 
Comer and authorize and direct the selectmen to accept on be- 
half of the town an offer of the United States of America to aid 
in financing the construction of said project by making a grant 
of money to the town; and authorize a building committee to 
construct said project and contract with respect thereto; and to 
authorize the treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to 
borrow such sums as may be necessary to meet any appropria- 
tion made; or take any action relative thereto. 

The following motion was made by Dr. Woodworth : 

That there be raised and appropriated the sum of $100,000 



—38— 

for the purpose of acquiring land for and the construction of 
an Elementary Consolidated School and originally equipping 
and furnishing the same in the vicinity of Kelly's Corner; and 
to meet the appropriation that there be transferred from the 
unappropriated revenue funds in the treasury the sum of $1,000, 
and the treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, be and 
hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of $60,000 under authori- 
ty of Chapter 44 of the General Laws and to issue bonds or 
notes of the town therefor, said bonds or notes to be payable in 
accordance with the provisions of said Chapter 44, so the whole 
loan shall be paid in not more than twenty years or at such 
earlier dates as the treasurer and selectmen may determine. 

All money received by way of grant from the Federal Gov- 
ernment on account of this project shall be applied first to meet 
the cost of construction thereof and any balance shall be ap- 
plied to the payment of the loan herein authorized. 

The selectmen are herby authorized and directed to accept 
on behalf of th^ town an offer of the United States of America 
to aid in financing the construction of said project by making 
a grant of money to the town; the building committee are au- 
thorized to proceed with the construction of said project and 
to enter into all necessary and proper contracts and agreements 
in respect thereto, all subject to applicable Federal regulations; 
and the selectmen and the building committee are authorized to 
do all othei^ acts and things necessary or convenient for obtain- 
ing said grant, for making said loan, and for constructing said 
project. 

After a discussion of the motion, it was voted to proceed to 
vote on the motion by ballot, those in favor of the motion voting 
YES and those opposed voting NO. 

The moderator appointed Samuel E. Knowlton, Clarence 
Frost, Clare Milbery, William H. Soar, G. Howard Reed and 
Arthur Lee to act as tellers, to receive and count the ballots. 

The moderator declared the vote as follows :- 

Total number of ballots cast 532 

Necessary two thirds . 355 

Yes 339 

No 192 

Blank 1 



—39— 

Art. 2. To see if the voters in town meeting will appoint the 
building committee, with power to select a suitable site and ap- 
propriate $500 for necessary expenses. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will appropriate the unexpended 
balance of the WPA Fund for a Work Relief Fund or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: That the town appropriate the unexpended balance 
$2764.31 of the WPA Fund for a Work Relief Fund to be ex- 
pended in 1937 and 1938. 



-40- 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 

Whole number recorded 39 

Born in Acton 8 Native parentage 31 

Males 19 Foreign parentage 2 

Females 20 Mixed parentage 6 



Marriages 

Whole number recorded 35 

Kesidents of Acton .... 42 Residents of other places 28 



Deaths 

Whole number recorded 55 

Residents of Acton .... 51 Residents of other places 4 

Occurring in Acton .... 38 Occurring in other places 17 

Average Age in Years, 64 -|- 



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—46— 

Deaths Registered in 1937 



Date 


Name 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Dys. 


April 


22 


Baxter, Charles Thayer 


58 


8 


14 


June 


21 


Berry, Emma Anne (Marison) 


76 


3 


25 


Feb. 


22 


Bradford, Marion Sewell 


57 


1 


29 


Dec. 


26 


Brennan, James 


60 






Jan. 


12 


Caldwell, Edwin Augustus 


70 


2 


10 


Sept. 


27 


Cameron, Robert Allan 






10 


Jan. 


19 


Clayton, Martha (Jones) 


57 


7 


11 


Nov. 


22 


Cole, Ella Wilson 


74 


7 


14 


Nov. 


1 


Condon, Timothv 


61 






Jan. 


11 


Costello, William James 


57 


5 


15 


June 


27 


Coughlin, Harold Joseph 


38 


2 


17 


June 


6 


Coughlin, John F. 


74 


6 


15 


Dec. 


27 


Crooker, S. Louisa 


74 


1 


11 


April 


28 


Currier, Emma J. 


82 


2 


1 


Oct. 


31 


Delahanty, Margaret 


61 






Jan. 


23 


Dunn, Winfield T. 


54 


3 


6 


Feb. 


27 


Durkee, Ida Lillian 


71 


4 


27 


Jan. 


8 


Farrar, Francis B. 


64 




17 


Oct. 


31 


Ford, Ada L 


87 


3 


24 


Aug. 


26 


Gallant, Minnie P. (Jones) 


68 


10 


19 


Jan. 


17 


Garceau, Augustine 


75 






Feb. 


28 


Graves, Frank H. 


59 


4 


4 


May 


29 


Gray, Doris Ellen 


20 


9 


15 


June 


7 


Grenier, Amelia 


50 






Oct. 


14 


Hardy, Beulah 


32 


5 


22 


Mar. 


4 


Harrison, Benjamin M. 


63 


10 


22 


Oct. 


9 


Holland, Sylva 


76 


2 


12 


July 


27 


Hubbard, Ellen (Rourke) 


80 


3 




May 


10 


Hutchinson, Lulu M. 


63 






Nov. 


29 


Jules, Caroline Everett 


85 


4 


25 


Oct. 


28 


Kulberg, Elinor Alice 






2] 


June 


13 


Littlefield, Guy P. 


60 


10 


24 i 


May 


24 


Livermore, Joseph W. 


71 


1 


24 i 


Aug. 


13 


Loring, Jane Burbank 


68 


1 


16i 


May 


22 


MacCharles, Catherine 


78 




21 


June 


28 


MacMillan, Daniel 


69 


5 


12 















—47-- 

Date Name 

June 7 Mead, Hobart E. 

Sept. 16 Matullevicz, William 

Nov. 17 McNiff, John Thomas 

Sept. 28 Mekkelsen, Henry 

Feb. 8 Middleton, Ada Josephine 

Dec. 8 O'Neil, Harry Bernard 

Dec. 14 Owen, Eliza Jane 

Oct. 31 Phalen, Edwin A. 

Nov. 7 Rieley, John Wesley 

Nov. 21 Sanborn, Philemon Russell 

Feb. 23 Sanborn, Sarah Kitfield 

Feb. 20 Taylor, Moses Emery 

June 3 Towler, Michael 

Jan. 23 Tuttle, Helen Josephine 

April 22 Twitchell, Clarence Varnum 

Jan. 28 Waite, Ella Frances 

Sept. 12 White, Ellen Theresa 

Mar. 15 Willett, Carrie E. Drake 

Mar. 13 Yeaton, Mary Ellen 



Yrs. 


Mos. 


Dys. 


66 


11 


3 


66 


3 


26 


74 




7 


48 






69 




24 


51 


5 


14 


88 




25 


82 


3 


9 


68 


8 


16 


88 


10 


21 


81 


8 


8 


87 


11 


5 


38 






47 


5 


9 


77 


9 




84 


6 


25 


61 


9 


30 


60 


6 


20 


82 


11 


4 



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List of Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1937 



Allen, H. V $2.00 

Allen, W. Stuart 2.00 

Alphin, Willard 2.00 

Anderson, Hilda ...... 5.00 

Anderson, Karl E 2.00 

Avery, Lee 2.00 

Backer, Helen 2.00 

Balsor, Frank 4.00 

Bancroft, Clesson A. ... 10.00 

Barry, David A 2.00 

Barteaux, Maynard W. . 2.00 

Bean, Mrs. Lucy A 5.00 

Bean, Priscilla 5.00 

Bedford, Mrs. A. E. .... 2.00 

Bell, George 2.00 

Benere, Antonia ...... 2.00 

Billings, Howard J 2.00 

Birch, Alfred 2.00 

Blanchard, Hazel G 2.00 

Bondelevitch, Walter . . 4.00 

Bowen, Robert M 4.00 

Bowman, Herbert E. . . . 2.00 

Bradbury, Rolfe 2.00 

Bradley, John J 2,00 

Bradley, Leo 7.00 

Braman, Dorothy 5.00 

Braman, Frank S 2.00 

Bredin, George 2.00 

Bressette, John 2.00 

Brill, Fred E 2.00 

Brown, Robert 2.00 

Buckley, John P . 5.00 

Butler, Mary K 2.00 

Caldwell, George B 2.00 

Caldwell, Hazel 2.00 

Caldwell, Margaret 2.00 

Cahill, William 2.00 



Carlson, Christian .... 2.00 

Carvelo, Manuel 2.00 

Chaffin, Nancy S 2.00 

Chapman, Duncan G. . . 5.00 

Charles, Will A 2.00 

Charter, William W. . . . 2,00 

ChristofFerson, Allen M. 2.00 

Christofferson, Edwin H. 2.00 

Clark, Lulu L 2.00 

Clark, 0. L 2.00 

Cloutier, Joseph 2.00 

Conant, Charlotte 2.00 

Condon, Timothy 2.00 

Costello, Timothy 2.00 

Coughlin, John F 2.00 

Coughlin, Mary T 2.00 

Coulter, Betty 2.00 

Creeley, Genevieve J. . . 2.00 

Crosby, W. C 5.00 

Cullinane, C. C 2.00 

Curley, T 2.00 

Davis, Charles E 7.00 

Davis, Edith (Pine 

Ledge Kennel) 25.00 

Davis, Henry 2.00 

Davis, Warren J 5.00 

Davis, Warren A. & Son 5.00 

Davis, Wendell F 5.00 

Day, Harold E. .... 2.00 

DeSouza, Joseph 2. 

Doyle, Henry K 2. 

Duggan, John 5.00 

Durkee, Mabel C 2.00 

Durkee, Raymond F. . . . 2.00 

Edney, Charles F. 2.00 

Espie, James 2.00 

Evans, John 2.00 



—51- 



Fanning, Jack Jr 2.00 

Fairbanks, Curtis S. . . . 5.00 

Farley, Charles J 7.00 

Farquhar, Stuart 6.00 

Farrar, James 2.00 

Farris, Charles 5.00 

Ferguson, Robert C. . . . 2.00 

Fernald, Stanbrough . . 2.00 

Fisher, Charles W 5.00 

Flerra, Louis 5.00 

Fletcher, John 4.00 

Flint, Buddie 2.00 

Flint, Marjorie S 5. 

Forbes, Edwin L 2. 

Fraser, Arthur 

(Kennel) 50.00 

Frazier, Robert A. 2.00 

Freeman, George 2. 

Freeman, Matthew D. . . 2. 

French, Mrs. James H. . 2.00 

Fuilonton, Llewellyn . . . 2.00 

Gagnon, John 7.00 

Gallagher, Margaret . . . 2,00 

Gallagher, T. C 5.00 

Gallant, Mildred 2.00 

Gallant, Minnie P 2.00 

Gatchell, Herman H. ... 4.00 

Geoghegan, Mrs. Joseph 2.00 

Gibbs, Harry F 5.00 

Godfrey, Carl R 2.00 

Goodrich, Hov^ard 4.00 

Goodwin, Martin F 2.00 

Goward Hannah C 5.00 

Gowen, Elmer 2.00 

Haas, Harry C 2.00 

Hall, Robert C 2.00 

Hall, Walter F 2.0C 

Harris, A. Leslie 5.00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Harris, Ray L 2.00 



Harrison, Agnes J 2.00 

Hart, Nelson H 2.00 

Harvey, W. Burton .... 9.00 

Hatch, Raymond L 2.00 

Hayes, F. C 2.00 

Hayes, Michael G 2.00 

Haynes, Henry L 2.00 

Hickey, Harry 5.00 

Hodgen, Hugh 2.00 

Holden, Frank H 2.00 

Holden, Wilhs L 2.00 

Holland, Hope C 2.00 

Holland, Neville R 2.00 

Hollowell, Elwin 2.00 

Hollowell, Norman E. . . 5.00 

Holt, Walter W 2.00 

Hubbard, David M 5.00 

Huess, Frederick H. . . . 2.00 

Hurley, John 2.00 

Jalonen, Arthur 4.00 

Jenks, Albert R. 4.00 

Jensen, Albert 2.00 

Jensen, Peter 9.00 

Johnson, Albion 2.00 

Johnson, Mary M 4,00 

Jones, Blanche 5.00 

Jones, Howard L 4.00 

Jones, Karl R 2.00 

Kazokas, Cypras 4.00 

Kelley, Chester E 2.00 

Kendall, Leoni 2.00 

Killis, Peter 2.00 

Kilmartin, William T. . . 7.00 

Kimball, Elnathan .... 4.00 

Knowlton, Samuel E. . . 2.00 

Kulberg, Harry 5.00 

Laffin, Ormal S. R 5.00 

Lane, Patricia R 2.00 

Larrabee, George W. . . 5.00 

LaRoche, Arthur 2.00 



-52— 



Leavitt, Arnold B 2.00 

LeClere, Edward 2. 

Liebfried, Walter ...... 5. 

Litcliard, Lucy B 4.00 

Littlefield, Ralph 2.00 

Livermore, Pearl R 2.00 

Lockwood, Ralph 2.00 

Logan, George W 5.00 

Lowden, Bertha 2.00 

Lowden, Richard 2.00 

MacGregor, H. Stuart . . 2.00 

Mahoney, James 4.00 

Marshall, W. Lawrence . 2.00 

Mason, Roger 2,00 

Massie, W. A 2.00 

Mauro, Frank 2.00 

Maynes, Everett M. . . . 2.00 

McCarthy, Leo 2.00 

Mead, Hobart E. . . . . . . 2. 

Mekkelson, Henry 2. 

Mekkelson, Ida 2. 

Merriam, Harold 2. 

Middieton, Willis J 5.00 

Milbery, Olive 2.00 

Mills, Myra Zeta 2.00 

Montague, Everett N. . . 2.00 

Moore, J. S 2.00 

Moore, Mildred Pope . . 6.00 

Moorehouse, C. F 2.00 

Morse, George A 2.00 

Murgatroyd, James .... 7.00 

Murray, John 2.00 

Nealey, Mrs. Edward . . 2.00 

Newell, Philip S. 2.00 

Nichols, Orla 2.00 

Nugent, Joseph 2.00 

Oliver, Hazel W 2. 

Parks, Milton G 2. 

Parson, Elsie F 7.00 

Parsons, Mrs. Norman . 7,00 



Pederson, John 7.00 

Penney, D. F 2.00 

Penney, Mary 5.00 

Perkins, A. Hazeltine . . 2.00 

Perkins, Edgar 2.00 

Perry, Tony 2.00 

Peterson, Billie 2.00 

Peterson, Edwin 2.00 

Peterson, Ruth 7.00 

Piper, Ralph W 2.00 

Prowse, Walter L 2.00 

Putnam, F. Wendell 7.00 

Rawitser, Mrs. William 2.00 

Raymond, George 7.00 

Reed, G. Howard 7.00 

Reed, Mildred V 5.00 

Reed, Otis 7.00 

Reid, Robert A., 3rd. . . . 2.00 

Reynolds, Mrs. Arthur 2.00 

Robbins, Mildred H. . . . 5.00 

Roche, Beaven 2.00 

Roche, Frank B 2.00 

Roche, Lawrence 2.00 

Roe, George 5.00 

Rugg, George 4.00 

Sawyer, Benjamin .... 2.00 

Sebastian, Lester A. . . . 2.00 

Scanlon, Mrs. Ruth H. . 2.00 

Shapley, Eva C 2.00 

Sheehan, Paul B 5.00 

Simeon, Luigi 5.00 

Smith, Hattie & Martha 2.00 

Smith, Ralph 1 2.00 

Soar, W. Henry 2.00 

Spinney, Marion 2.00 

Starck, Cecil 2.00 

Stevens, John N 2.00 

Stoney, Reginald 2.00 

Sweeney, Daniel 2.00 

Sweet, Charles Craig . . 2.00 



:53— 



Sylvia, Winifred ...... 2. 

Tabbi, Salvatore 5.00 

Tasker, Frank E . 2 

Taylor, Lillian E 2 

Taylor, Simon D • . . 2 

Taylor, Spencer H 2 

Todd, Ethel L 18 

Tolman, William 5 

Tompkins, Elizabeth . . . 5.00 

Towne, Roger P 2 

Tracy, Alfred H 2 

Tucker, Use B . 2.00 

Tuttle, Horace F . 2 



Tuttle, Osgood 5.00 

Veasie, Stanley 2.00 

Waite, Frederick A 7.00 

Walther, Francis A. . . . 2.00 

Waluk, John 4.00 

Watkins, John H 2.00 

Wayne, Jo Arthur 2.00 

Whitcomb, Roy 2 

Willett, Fred W 2 

Wise, Glenna 2.00 

Wood, Mrs. H. L 2.00 

Wood, Ruth 0. .... 2.00 

Woodworth, Leona .... 2.00 



239 licenses at $2.00 $478.00 

62 licenses at 5.00 310.00 

1 license at 50.00 50.00 

1 license at 25.00 * 25.00 

Deduct fees 303 at 20 cents 

Paid to Town Treasurer 



Notice 



$863.00 
60.60 



$802.40 



All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the owners or 
keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, regard- 
less of time of year ownership is acquired. 

No tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 



HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk 



-54— 



Jury List Revised — 1937 



Precinct 1 



Frank S. Rogers 
Oliver D. Wood 
Charles E. Willett 
Charles Farris 



Harlan E. Tuttle 
W. Stuart Allen 
Ray L. Harris 
John Pederson 



Frank W. Putnam, Jr. 



John G. Maguire 
H. L. Jones 
David Clayton 
John Enneguess 



Precinct 2 

Reginald Stoney 
Frank A. Merriam 
Daniel W. Sheehan 
Malcolm Fullonton 
John Anderson 



Leland H. Campbell 
Warren Davis 
John E. Beach 
August N. Hederstedt 



Precinct 3 



William Munn 
Arthur Lee 
Raymond Gallant 
John W. Hurley 



Frederick Kennedy 



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-69- 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

I herewith submit the following report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1937. 
Arrests and prosecutions made on the following complaints: 

Drunkenness 15 

Operating under the influence of liquor 6 

Manslaughter 3 

Operating so as to endanger 5 

Failing to obey traffic signs 10 

Failing to slow for intersection 5 

Failing to keep to right of way 2 

Operating without proper registration plates 1 

Operating without lights 1 

Operating at an excessive rate of speed 1 

Leaving scene after causing property damage 1 

Larceny 1 

Disturbing a public assembly 5 

Assault and Battery 1 

Violation of the trapping laws 6 

Keeping an unlicensed dog 1 

Collecting junk without a license 4 

Desertion 1 

Non-support 1 

Delinquent child complaints 2 

Committed to State Hospitals 2 

Analysis of Automobile accidents : 

Accidents reported 43 

Passengers injured 44 

Passengers killed 2 

Pedestrians injured by autos 5 

Pedestrians killed by autos 2 

Licenses suspended or revoked 22 

Registrations revoked 9 

I wish to call your attention to the number of persons killed or 
injured by motor vehicles in this town during the past year and 
to ask every one who operates an automobile, to drive more care- 



—70— 

fully, that we may reduce the number of accidents this year. 

I also wish to call to your attention the fact that there were 
six operators arrested for operating while under the influence of 
liquor. Three of these operators were involved in accidents in 
which one person was killed and several injured. The other three 
were taken off the road before they became involved in accidents. 
This type of operator deserves no sympathy. Do not operate a 
motor vehicle after drinking, as many innocent people are killed 
each year by drunken drivers. 

Many complaints were received of speedsters in the different 
parts of the town. A check was made and several hundred mo- 
torists were warned to reduce their speed on entering the vil- 
lages. 

In closing, I wish to thank all who have co-operated with me 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



Report of Inspector of Animals 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of the Town of Acton : 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for the year 
1937. 

Cows 410 

Young Cattle 85 

Bulls 19 

Swine 123 

Sheep » ^'^ 

Goats 12 

Quarantined Dogs 11 

Rabies positive 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector. 



* 



—71— 



Report of Dog Officer 



To) the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report, as Dog Officer, covering work 
done for the year 1937: 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law .... 46 

Number of dogs sold in accordance with law 1 

Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance with 

law 6 

Total number of dogs handled 53 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 34 

Warnings to delinquent dog owners to get Licenses 130 

Number of cases prosecuted 1 

Appropriation $200.00 

46 dogs at $3.00 for six days' board 138.00 

46 dogs at $1.00 46.00 

Total for board and disposal $184.00 

Gentlemen: 

I therefore, recommend that the appropriation for the year 
1938 be the same $200.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dog Officer. 



—72— 
Report of Superintendent of Moth Control Work 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1937. 

The appropriation of $1,000 was made for this work last year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $200. 

The labor and running expense of the sprayer and truck were 
about $300. 

The balance of the appropriation was used for creosoting 
gypsy moth nests along the highways and for other necessary 
work as directed by the State Supt. of Moth Control. 

An appropriation of $1400 is recommended for moth control 
which will include a double spraying throughout the town. 

The gypsy moth infestation is bad in all sections of the town, 
and will require special attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Supt. 



Report of Stiperintendent of Streets 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I submit herewith my report covering the highway mainten- 
ance and construction work during 1937. 

In addition to regular maintenance work, such as scraping, 
dragging, surface repair, patching and oiling. 

New gravel, widen and oil : Nagog Hill Road, 1445 feet, and 
18 feet of 12-inch Corrugated Pipe; Carlisle Road, new gravel, 
1485 feet; Strawberry Hill Road, 500 feet gravel and oil; Hay- 
ward Road, 1320 feet gravel; River Street, 730 feet gravel and 
oil; Martin Street, 32 feet of 26-inch Corrugated Arch Pipe; 
Church Street, gravel, oil and one new catch basin; School 
Street, one new catch basin; River Street and Parker Street, 

new guard rail and posts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. PERKINS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



—73— 

Assessors' Report 

Tax assessed as follows: 

Building's, exclusive of land ...... $2,459,295.00 

Land 688,370.00 

Personal 442,190.00 

$3,589,855.00 

Valuation January 1, 1936 ... 3,755,660.00 

Decrease in valuation 165,805.00 

Rate of taxation, $28.50 

Real estate $89,708.63 

Personal estate 12,602.54 

Poll^ ; 1,554.00 

— $103,865.17 

Amount of Monej^ Raised: 

State Tax $6,900.00 

County Tax 6,097.78 

State Parks Tax 67.61 

Town Grant 87,296.80 

Overlay 3,502.98 

$103,865.17 

Added Assessment: 

Buildings, exclusive of land . . . . $1,550.00 

Land 450.00 

$2,000.00 

Tax: 

Real Estate $57.00 

Polls 34.00 

$91.00 

Excise : 

Number of Vehicles Assessed . . . 1227 

Total Valuation of Motor Vehicles $276,960.00 

Rate of Taxation, $34.62 

Total Excise Tax $7,791.61 

WARREN H. JONES, 
ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
HENRY L. HAYNES, 

Board of Assessors. 



74- 



Report of Tax Collector 



1935 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 . ?9,632.28 

Interest Collected 780.56 

Costs Collected . 1.05 

$10,393.89 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $9,801.05 

Abated 426.58 

Tax Titles 166.26 

$10,393.89 

1936 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $31,600.42 

Interest Collected 760.48 

$32,360.90 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $20,454.73 

Abated 8.75 

Tax Titles 200.92 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 11,696.90 

$32,360.90 

1936 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $344.00 

Interest Collected 8.49 

Costs Collected 27.30 

$379.79 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $239.79 

Abated 70i.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 70.00 

379.79 



i 



—75— 

1937 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $102,368.17 

Interest Collected 21.54 

$102,389.71 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $66,575.41 

Abated 478.80 

Tax Titles 1,079.44 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $34,256.06 

— $102,389.71 

i 1937 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $1,590.00 

f Costs Collected 36.75 

' $1,626.75 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,302.75 

Abated ^00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 322.00 

— $1,626.75 

I 1932 EXCISE 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $192.75 

Cr. 

Judgment . $192.75 

I 1933 EXCISE 

Dr. 

Collected Jan. 1, 1937 $87.06 

Adjustment .06 

$87.12 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $2.00 

Judgment 85.12 

$87.12 



—76— 

1934 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $229.48 

Added Tax 2.66 

Interest Collected 1.18 

$233.32 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $7.84 

Abated ( 8.66 

Judgment 216.82 

$233.32 

1935 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $741.65 

Interest Collected 76.99 

$818.64 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $738.79 

Abated 69.32 

Judgment 7.93 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 2.60 

$818.64 

1936 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan, 1, 1937 $2,534.24 

Interest Collected 66.12 

$2,600.36 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,694.88 

Abated 2.94 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 902.54 

$2,600.36 

1937 EXCISE 
Dr. 

Committed $7,791.63 

Interest Collected 6.62 

$7,798.25 



—77- 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer 

Abated 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 



$4,945.87 

203.33 

2,649.05 



$7,798.25 



CHARLES A. DURKEE, 

Collector. 



SUMMARY OF TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

Total Debits 

1935 Town Tax . $10,393.89 

1936 Town Tax, 32,360.90, 

1937 Town Tax 102,389.71 

1936 Poll Tax 379.79 

1937 Poll Tax 1,626.75 

1932 Excise Tax . 192.75 

1933 Excise Tax 87.12 

1934 Excise Tax 233.32 

1935 Excise Tax 818.64 

1936 Excise Tax 2,600.36 

1937 Excise Tax 7,798.25 

$158,881.48 

Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $105,763.11 

Abated 1,270.38 

Tax Titles 1,446.62 

Judgments 502.62 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 49,898.75 

$158,881.48 



CHARLES A. DURKEE, 

Collector 



—78- 



Fire Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report for the Fire Department for the 
year of 1937. 

The total number of alarms responded to b}^ the entire depart- 
ment are as follows : 

Buildings, 14; auto, 1; chimney, 18; false, 1; miscellaneous, 3; 
out of town, 2. 

Total cost of extinguishing — $357.50. 

The new fire whistle has been installed at West Acton, and was 
put into service on July 1, 1937 and has been an improvement 
in the efficiency of the department. 

I would like to report at this time that the fire apparatus is 
in perfect condition, and that the Fire Department as a whole, 
with the exception of hose shortage is in first class shape. 

I would like to recommend that the town appropriate the sum 
of $550.00 to purchase new fire hose. I also recommend that the 
town appropriate a sum of money to make necessary repairs on 
the South and Center fire stations. 



Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



-79- 



Forest Warden's Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for the year 
ending December Slst, 1937 : 

Total number of fires responded to 34 

Out of town 3 

Total cost of extinguishing $331.10 

Total property loss in dollars and cents $425.00 

The forest fire truck and equipment are in good condition. 

The new hose and water cans purchased last year eliminate 
having to purchase any new equipment this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



—80— 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1937. 

The appropriation of $500 which was made for this work last 
year is only to take care of emergency work. It was devoted 
entirely to the removal of dangerous trees and dead limbs, and 
a few replacements. 

We have now reached the point where some consideration 
should be taken for our shade trees. We should have m^ore tho- 
rough trimming and more replacements. 

I therefore recommend that $1200.00 be appropriated next 
year to allow for the planting of a substantial number of trees 
and a thorough trimming of some streets in addition to the em- 
ergency work of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden. 



-Si- 



Report of Board of Health 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, the Board of Health of 
Acton herewith submits the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1937. 

Due to unusual conditions arising this year, it was impossible 
for your Board to stay within the $1000 appropriation. 

There was increased expense in care of the Dump, and a new 
pump became necessary to put out the fires quickly. The old 
pump had been repaired until mechanics claimed it could no 
longer be fixed. The new pump will pay for itself in time and 
labor saving. We have tried to keep the dump in a condition 
so that the townspeople using it could back their cars and trucks 
to the edge and dump without danger of puncturing tires. In 
this way, we will save money in labor from having to carry and 
rake rubbish from wherever dumped as it has been done in the 
past. 

There have been many investigations from complaints which 
through the cooperation of the townspeople we were able to 
straighten out without trouble or added expense to the tov/n. 

There were many severe cases of pneumonia and one family 
requiring Rabies treatment which we had to take care of. This 
is required by Laws over which we have no control and no other 
alternative but to pay the bills. In the case of Rabies, the Coun- 
ty refunds the money but it goes into the overlay surplus. 

We felt it a duty to the townspeople to employ a substitute 
nurse during the vacation of our town nurse as there were 
many sick people requiring constant nursing care who could not 
afford a trained nurse, and many cases covered by insurance 
policies, the insurance company paying for this, care, but again, 
the money thus collected went to the overlay surplus. This seems 
unfair, but Laws make it so. 

As evidence of the increased work done by your Board this 
year, we have been forced to hold monthly meetings and several 
months, two meetings, where in the past, your Board only held 
a meeting when business required it. 



—82— 

Burial permits issued in Acton 38 

Residents who died in other towns 18 



Total number of deaths recorded 56 

Non-resident burials 25 

List of contagious diseases reported to Board of Health Janu- 
ary 1, 1937 to January 1, 1938: 

Dog Bite 10 

Lobar Pneumonia 2 

Scarlet Fever 3 

Chicken Pox 4 

Whooping Cough 9 

Influenza 1 

Total 29 

Deaths: None. 

Your Board requests the continued support of the people in 
their endeavor to carry on the necessary work for the best in- 
terests of the town as a whole. 

We would recommend $1500 next year in the hope that the 
$500 extra will take care of unusual conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DR. FRANK E. TASKER, Chairman, 
DR. 0. LAWRENCE CLARK, Sec-Clerk, 
MRS. SIMON TAYLOR, 
ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, Agent, 

Board of Health. 



—83— 

Report of Town Nurse 

I herewith submit my annual report as Public Health Nurse, 
which also includes the report of Mrs. Robert Rhoades, who 
substituted for the month of August during my vacation. 

Bedside nursing 1548 

Welfare cases 234 

Child Welfare 231 

Pre-natal calls 134 

Post-natal calls 110 

There were but few cases of contagious diseases. The Dip- 
theria prevention clinic was held in May. Only 16 pre-school 
children were inoculated. The response of school children v/as 
greater. It is desirable that children have these inoculations 
at an early age, for their own protection. 

The value, of what we hope may be a permanent Well Child 
Conference, was demonstrated by Dr. Sarah Coffin of Mass. 
State Dept. of Health at Acton Centre the week of May 17-21. 
The Clinic staff included a physician, nutritionist, and dental 
hygienist, who gave a very fine examination. This Demonstra- 
tion Conference was for all pre-school children but owing to 
lack of time, the number was limited to 90 appointments. We 
had an attendance of 82; 8 were absent on account of illness. 
Preparing for the conference placed a great responsibility on 
the Committee who were willing to take charge of the registra- 
tion of children, making appointments and in many cases pro- 
viding transportation. 

The results of the examinations showed plainly the need of 
a Well Child Conference as a part of our Health program. When 
the next conference is held, probably in March, we hope that 
some definite program may be worked out, to care for this need. 

An educational exhibit, showing by posters, the value and 
variety of public health nursing, was shown at the Acton Fair. 
Health literature was given upon request. This exhibit could be 
enlarged upon and prove helpful in spreading information re- 
garding personal and public health. 

I am greatly indebted to those who have so kindly assisted 
me in furthering Public Health in Acton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



—84— 



Goodnow Fund 



For the year ending December 31, 1937 



Investments 



Warren Institution for Savings $1,465.53 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank . . 1,000.00 
City Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

$3,465.53 

Receipts 

Warren Institution for Savings $33.15 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank . . 30.00 

City Institution for Savings 25.00 

$88.15 

Payments 

Harlan E. Tuttle, treasurer of the 

Evangelical Church in Acton .... $68.00 

Fred W. Green, care of Goodnow lot, 

Woodlawn Cemetery 20.00 

Added to Savings Account .15 

$88.15 

CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



-85- 



Report of the Work of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service In Acton for the Year 1937 



The following is a report of the work of the Middlesex County 
Extension Service for the town of Acton during 1937. 

Fruit growing and poultry are the dominant agricultural in- 
terests in town, and for this reason much time was spent on 
these two enterprises. An economic information meeting brought 
Professor Moser, Massachusetts State College, to lead a discus- 
sion of business conditions, farm, credit, and farm management. 
A mouse control demonstration was held at the Jenks Farm, with 
Walter Dykstra of the United States Biological Survey present- 
ing the information. Four other orchard meetings were held 
at the Jenks farm during the summer. Timely information was 
brought to these meetings by specialists from the State College, 
An average attendance of twenty-five fruit growers proved the 
interest of the town in this information. An investigation of or- 
chard soil was carried on at the Horace Tuttle farm in Acton 
Centre. A trench was dug to map the root system of an apple 
tree. 

A discussion of marketing was given before a Pomona Grange 
meeting in Acton. Aid was extended to the Acton Fair by as- 
sisting on committees and obtaining exhibits. Spray notices 
were sent at timely intervals to fruit growers and market gar- 
deners of Acton. 

Sixty-three farm visits were made to sixteen poultrymen in 
Acton. These covered poultry diseases and poultry management 
problems.^ Certain material on poultry diseases, marketing and 
management were sent to forty-two poultrymen. A culling, 
tattooing, and vaccination demonstration was held at Joseph 
Perry's in West Acton. 

The Middlesex County Poultry Association held eight meet- 
ings at the Women's Club Building in Acton Centre. Dr. C. L. 
Martin, Mr. P. L. Putnam, Professor G. T. Klein, and Mr. J. H. 



—86— 

Vondell of the Massachusetts State College were among the 
speakers. 

Assistance was given to farmers in securing dairy replace- 
ments. They were furnished information on milk market prob- 
lems, pasture improvement, dairy farm accounts, and poultry 
housing. 

Mr. Porter G. Jenks is a member of the Middlesex-Worcester 
Dairy Marketing Committee. 

A group of homemakers in Acton, North Acton and West 
Acton took the coat project in the late fall of 1935, and in the 
winter of 1936 took the project in Garment Finishes. In the 
spring they took the Silk and Wool Dress project, and the Food 
Buying project. A group also participated in the Music and 
Folk Dancing project and took part in the Annual Homemakers' 
Day at Lexington in June. 

The Town committee includes Mrs. Albert Durkee, Chair- 
man; Mrs. Clarence Frost, Mrs. Henry Teele, Mrs. Arthur 
Freese, and Mrs. Benjamin Ineson. 

During the year the boys and girls in Acton were very active 
in 4-H Club work, with an enrollment of 67 boys and 36 girls. 
They were interested in various clubs which included home fur- 
nishing, clothing, canning, garden, conservation and poultry. 
There was also an active agricultural club at the high school. 
Speakers for the various meetings were obtained from the Ex- 
tension Service. 

Mr. Walter E. Hall served as chairman of the 4-H committee 
for Acton, and eleven leaders assisted in the work. 

At the Acton Fair the Junior exhibit was in charge of older 
4-H Club boys and girls. These young people held a very fine 
exhibit which was a credit to the Fair. 



—87— 
Report of Sealer of Weights and Measures 



p 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report as Sealer of Weights and Mea- 
sures for the year ending December 31, 1937 :- 

The increasing number of changes in the Statutes governing 
the work of Sealers of Weights and Measures, readjustment of 
charges, and the continued vigilance demanded in the checking 
of Hawkers' and Pedlars' licenses has demanded much attention 
in the work of this department. 

The cooperation of all persons in this town having equipment 
for sealing has been a real help and they are at all times as in- 
terested in having their equipment in good condition for the 
benefit of the public as the law requires. The assistance of 
James J. Dawson, Inspector from the Division of Standards 
during the year was most helpful, in the matter of checking 
Truck Tank Meters and truck scales with the more efficient 
equipment of the State. 

The annual report of the Director of Standards calls attention 
to the requirements of providing, by the Town, of equipment for 
the purpose of testing Truck Meter Systems, This will be an 
expense to the Town of about from $75 to $600, for Trailer with 
50 gallon test tank. A satisfactory test is difficult with the 
present equipment. 

Two day's attendance at the convention of Sealers of Weights 
and Measures at Haverhill, was a real education and should 
make your Sealer more efficient in the performance of his 
work. 

The expenses for the year follows : 

Supplies $10.54 

Expense, two days Convention 9.50 

Telephone and Postage .69 

Total $20.73 

Sealing fees collected $78.88 

Paid Town Ti-easurer $78.88 



—88— 

In addition to reweighing of commodities the following equip- 
ment has been checked :- 

SCALES Adjusted Sealed Not SJealed Condemned 

Platform over 5,000 lbs 5 1 

Platform 100 to 5,000 lbs. . . 1 24 3 

Counter over 100 lbs 1 

Counter under 100 lbs 11 1 

Beam over 100 lbs . 1 

Spring over 100 lbs 2 

Spring under 100 lbs 18 1 

Computing under 100 lbs. . . . 9 1 

Personali Weigjhing^ ........ 4 

Prescription 1 

Weights : 

Apothecary 11 

Avoirdupois 130 

Liquid : 

Under 5 gallons 60 

5 gallons or over 52 

Oil Jars 11 

Pumps : 

Gas Pumps 11 14 

Gas Measuring Meters .... 30 

Kerosene Pumps 9 1 

Tank Truck Meter Syst's. 1 13 

Molasses Pump 1 

Quantity Measures on Pumps 2 83 

Yard Sticks 9 

Total 4 498 19 3 

Respectfully submitted, 



CLARE A. MILBERY, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



—89- 



Librarian's Report 1937 



Accessions: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 
1937, 20,679. Increase by purchase, 338. Increase by gift, 29. 
Total Increase 367. Withdrawn from circulation, 148. Total 
number of volumes in, the Library January 1, 1938, 20,898. 

Circulation : Number of days the Library was open, 102 
Number of volumes circulated, 14,588. 
Largest daily circulation, 253. 
Smallest daily circulation, 72. 
Daily average circulation, 162 plus. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and paid to 
Town Treasurer, $60.41. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following sources : 
U. S. Government 1, State of Massachusetts 9, Alexander Legge 
Memorial Committee 1, Doubleday Doran Co, 1, Edith N. Rogers 
1, Ernest H. Washburn 2, Frances Fairbanks 2, Harvard College 
1, Little Brown & Co. 1, Marion Burrage 5, Ray Lyneare Wil- 
bur 1, Roy S. Whitcomb 1, Viscose Co 1, Wheat Flour Institute 
1. Total 28. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NON-FICTION 



Adamic, L. — The Natives Return 914.9A198n 

Anon— High Water Data, Flood of 1936 52A100h 

Anon — Notes on the Tercentenary 974.5A100n 

Anon — One Hundred Years of Publishing 65A100on 

Anon — The Story oi^ Rayon 67A100s 

Baker, R. H. — Introducing the Constellations 52B168i 

Baldwin, S.— Business in the Middle Ages 940B182b 

Beardsley, J. B.— From Wheat to Flour 63B368f 

Bertram, H.— FHght to Hell 910B548f 

Beveridge, A. J, — Abraham Lincoln 4 vols. 922L736be 



—90-— 

Bostwick, A. E. The American Public Library 02B'747a 

Brewster,. W. — Octobei' Farm 591^5460 

Brooks, V. W. — The Fiowernig of New England 81B873f 

Brown, C. S. — Bible Texts in Gross Word Puzzles 79B877b 

Carnegie, D. — How to Win Friends and Influence 

People 15C289h. . 

Carnochan, F. G. — The Empire of the Snakes 916-6C261e 

Gather, W.— Not Under Forty 81C363n 

Chamberlain, S.— Cape Cod in the Sun 917-3C4431c 

Chanler, Mrs. W.— Autumn in the Valley 922C457e 

Chapman, W. — Wilderness Wanderers 59C4461w 

Chase, M. E.— A Goodley Heritage 922G4873c 

Chase S.— Rich Land-Poor Land 63C487r 

Chicione, V. B.— The Joy of Discipline 37Co32j 

Coffin, R. T.— Kennebec, Cradle of Americans 917-3C875k 

Collins, A. F.— The March of Chemistry 66C712m 

Cooiidge, D.— Death Valley Prospectors 917-3C774d 

Crissey, F.— Alexander Legge, 1866-1933 922L513c 

Grouse, R.- — Mr. Currier and Mr. Ives 7oC952m 

Davis, W. S. — Practical Amateur Photography 77D265p 

Day, L. F. — Lettering in Ornament 74D2741 

De la Barca, C— Life in Mexico 917-2D3811 

DeMar, C— Marathon 79D372m 

Dillaway, N. — Prophet of America 81D578p 

Ditmars, R. L.— The Book of Living Reptiles 59Dol5bo 

Dutton, R.— The EngMsh Country House 914-2D977e 

Eaton, W. P.— Wild Gardens of New England 81E14w 

Ekins, H. R. — Around the World in Eighteen Days . . . 910E36a 
Felleman, H. (Editor)— Best Beloved Poems of the 

American People 80F318b 

Fergusson, E. — Guatemala 917-28F354g 

Field, I.— This Life Iv'e Loved 922F454f 

Floherty, J. J.— On the Air 62F628o 

Franck, H. A. — Roaming in Hawaii 919-6F822r 

French, J. L.— The Pioneer West 917-3F874p 

Glover, C. A. — The Easter Radiance 23G566e 

Hartman, G.— The World We Live In 57H333w 

Hillis, M. — Live Alone and Like It 81H6551 

Hine, W. R.— New Flower Arrangements 71H662n 

Howe, F. C. — Denmark the Cooperative Way .... 33H855d 



—91-— 

Humphrey's, C. A. — Field, Camp, Hospital and Prison 

In the Civil War 973-7H9271f 

Huxley, J. — T. H. Huxley's Diary of the Voyage of 

H. M. S. Rattlesnake 917-3H986t 

Innes, W. I.— The Complete Aquarium Book 59158c 

Job, H. K. — How to Study Birds 59J62h 

Johnson, H. S.— The Blue Eagle from Egg to Earth . . 922J67J 

Jones, E. S. — Victorious Living 24J76v 

Kaga-wa T. — Brotherhood Economics 33Kllb 

Keller, H. R.— The Reader's Digest of Books 01K29r 

Kipling, R.— Something of Myself . 924K57k 

Largelof, S.— The Diary of Selma Largelof 928L1742i 

Lawrence, D. — Supreme Court or Political Puppets . . . 34L419s 

Leete, F. D.— Skyward 20L487s 

Link, H. C— The Return to Religion 15L756r 

Lucas, E. V. — If Dogs Could Write 82L933i 

Lucas, J. M. — The Earth Changes ■ . 55L933e 

Ludwig, E.— The Nile 916L948n 

McClellan, E. — History of American Costume 39M126h 

Maule, F.— Men Wanted . 37M449m 

Mooney, M. — Crime Incorporated 36M818c 

Moribana & Heikwa — Flower Arrangements 71M854s 

Morton, H. C. V.— In the Steps of St. Paul 915-6M889i 

Nelson, M. — Year Book of Contemporary Poetry .... 81N428y 

Nesbitt, L. M.— -Desolate Marches . . . ^. . 918N458d 

Niemann, W. — Brahms ^ 926B813n 

Nutting, W.— Vermont Beautiful 917.3N976v 

O'Brien, P. J.— Will Rogers 922R7311o 

Orr, D. — Portrait of a People 914,9075p 

Page, K. — Living Courageously 33P1321 

Paul, E.— The Life and Death of a Spanish Town . . 914.6P3241 

Pennell, J. — Etchers and Etching 76P413e 

Perkins, T.— Enghsh Cathedrals 914.2P451s 

Phillips, H. A.— White Elephants in the Caribbean 917.29P555w 

Pickwell, C— Weather 55P549w 

Pound, A. — The Turning Wheel-Story of General 

Motors 38P876t 

Purvis, M. — American Agent 35P986a 

Remington, F.— Drawings 74R388d 

Riesemann, 0. V.— Moussorgsky 928M933r 



—92— 

Rimsky-Korsakoff, N. A.— My Musical Life 928R577r 

Rothenstein, W. — Men and Memories 924R846r 

Sandstrom, H. A. — Between School Hours 81S221b 

Schauffler, R. H. — Beethoven the Man Who Freed 

Music 926B415S 

Shepard, 0. — Pedlers Progress 922A354sh 

Smith, F. — History of Dedham, Massachusetts 974.5S647h 

Smith, W. M.~Peloubets Select Notes 26P683p 

Speer, R. E.— The Meaning of Christ to Me 23S742m 

Specht, R.— Giacomo Puccini 927P977s 

Stevens, G. A. — Garden Flowers in Color 71S844g 

Stote, D.— Making the Most of Your Looks 64S863m 

Taylor, A. D.— The Complete Garden 71T238c 

Taylor, N. (Editor) — The Garden Dictionary 63T244g 

Thomson, B.— The Story of Scotland Yard 35.4T482s 

Thoreau, H. D.— Men of Concord 81T488me 

Wead, F.— Gales, Ice and Men 919.8W361g 

Webb, W. P.— The Texas Rangers 976.4W368t 

Wilbur, R. L. and Hyde, A. M.— The Hoover Policies 32W666h 
V/ilson, J. C— Three Wheeling Through Africa . . . 916.6W749t 
Worsley, F. and Griffith G.— The Romance of Lloyds 36W931r 

FICTION 

Abbot, J.— Miss Jolley's Family A132m 

Abbott, J. — Stranger in the House A132st 

Ayers, R.— Afterglow A977a 

Bacheler, I. — Uncle Peel B121u 

Bailey, H. C— Mr. Fortune Objects B154m 

Bailey, T.— I've Been to London B156i 

Baldwin, F.— Garden Oats B181g 

Baldwin, F.— That Man is Mine B181t 

Baldwin, F.— Today's Virtue B181to 

Baliew, C. — Cowpuncher B191c 

Beach, Rex— Men of the Outer Isles B365mc 

Bennett, A. — Imperial Palace B471i 

Bennet, R. A.— The Gold Wolf B469go 

Berry, R. A. — Dusty Rivers B534d 

Biggers, E. D. — Seven Keys to Baldpate B5922s 

Billings, B. — Trigger Partners B598tr 



—93— 

Botcome, P. — Level Crossing B7511 

Bovver, B. M. — The Dry Kiage Gang B786dr 

Bower, B. M.— The North 'Wind Do Blow B786n 

Bower, B. M. — Open Land B786o 

Bower, B. M.— Trouble Rides the Wind B786tt 

Bower, B. M.— Happy Jack B786h 

Brand, M.— The King Bird Rides B817k 

Brand, M. — The Rancher's Revenge B817r 

Bugbee, E. — Peggy Covers the News . B931p 

Cantwell, R.— The Land of Plenty C2341 

Carfrae, E. — Silver Magic .. C276si 

Christie, A.— The A. B. C. Murders C5551a 

Christie, A. — Cards on the Table C5551c 

Cody, S.— Dangerous Gold C6712d 

Colver, A. R. — I've Been Little Too Long C727i 

Colver, A. R.— Only Let Me Live C727on 

Colver, A. R. — Strangers at Sea C727s 

Colver, A. R.— Wild Song C727wi 

Coolidge, D. — The Fighting Danities C7742f 

Crofts, F. W. — The Loss of the Jane Vosper C9411 

Cronin, A. J.—The Citadel C9471c 

Cullum, R.~The Flaming Wilderness , C987f 

Cunningham, S. — Buckaroo C9732b 

Deeping, E. M. — No Hero This DSlln 

Dell, E.~Honey Balls Farm D357ho 

Doyle, A. C— The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes D754c 

Doyle, C. — The Maracot Deep D754ma 

Erskine, L, Y. — Renfrew in the Valley of Vanquished 

Men E735r 

Evarts, H. — Short Grass E921so 

Fielding, A. E. — Mystery at the Rectory F4591m 

Fletcher, J. S.~The Eleventh Hour F613el . 

Fletcher, J. S. — Murder of a Banker F613mr 

Fox, J. Jr. — Trail of the Lonesome Pine F7925t 

Gibbs, P.— Cities of Refuge G443ci 

Gill, T.— Red Earth G475r 

Gordon, R. C— The Rebel Loyalist G662re 

Gordon, R. C. — Torches Through the Bush G662ta 

Gregory, J. — High Courage G822hi 

Gregory, J.—The Island of Allure G822i 



—94— 

Grey, Z.— The Lost Wagon Train G8421p 

Hanck, L. P. — A Little Aversion H3681J 

Hanck, L. P. — ^Without Charm Please H368wi 

Hendryx, J. B. — Outlaws of Halfaday Creek H498ou 

Hueston, E. — A Roof Over Their Heads H887ro 

Keating, L. A. — Sunset Range K25s 

Kelland, C. B.— Dreamland K293dr 

Kelland, C. B.— The Jealous House K293J 

Kern, C. J. — I Was a Probationer K39iw 

Knight, K. M.— The Clue to the Poor Man's Shilling K71c 

Kyne, P. B. — Soldiers, Sailors and Dogs K99so 

Larrimore, L. — Two Keys to a Cabin L334tw 

Lawrence, J. — The Sound of Running Feet L421s 

Le May, A. — Cattle Kingdom L549c 

Lewis, S.— It Can't Happen Here L676i 

Lewis, S. — Work of Art L676w 

Lincoln, J. C. — Storm Girl L7372su 

Loring, E. — As Long As I Live L873a 

Lutz, G. L. H.— Beauty for Ashes L975bf 

Lutz, G. L. H.— The Christmas Bride L975ck 

Lutz, G, L. H. — Sunrise L975sw 

McCulley, J.— Canyon of Peril M1332c 

Mann, E. B.— Thirsty Range M281t 

Marie, Queen— Masks M334m 

Marquand, J. P. — The Late George Apley M3571 

Marshall, E.— The Light in the Jungle M36751i 

Meader, S. W.— Trap Lines North M4811t 

Miln, L. T.— Peng Wee's Harvest M859p 

Mitchell, M.— Gone With the Wind . M6826g 

Mowey, W. B.— The Girl from God's Mercie M936g 

Norris, K. — Bread Into Roses N856br 

Norris K.— Secret Marriage » N856s 

Norris K.— Woman In Love N856wo 

O'Brien, J. — Corporal Corey of the Royal Canadian 

Mounted C)13c 

Ogden, G. W.— Deputy Sheriff 034d 

Oppenheim E. P.— The Battle of Basinghall Street . . 062ba 

Oppenheim E. P. — Crooks in the Sunshine 062cr 

Oppenheim E. P.— The Dumb Gods Speak 062du 

Oppenheim E. P. — A Man Without Nerves 062mn 



—95— 

Oppenheim E. P. — The Strange Boarders of Palace 

Crescent 062sr 

Ostenso, M.— The Stone Field 0852s 

Pahlow, G.— Honey Moon Trails P141h 

Parmenter, C. W. — The Long^ Quest P2541 

Parmenter, C. W. — Miss Aladdin P254m 

Parmenter, C. W. — Shining Palace P254sh 

Parrish, A. — Golden Wedding P2615g 

Payne, E. S. — Something to Remember P3461so 

Pedler, M,— Flame in the Wind P371f 

Provost, A. L. — A Man There Was P969m 

Raine, W. M.— Bucky Follows a Cold Trail R155br 

Raine, W. M. — For Honor and Life R155fo 

Rees, R. — April Sowing R3281a 

Rhode, J. — The Fire at Graycomb Farm R475f 

Rhode, J.— The Harvest Murder R475ha 

Rinehart, M. R.— The Doctor ' R579dp 

Roberts, K. — Northwest Passage . . R645n 

Robertson, F. C. — The Foreman of the Forty Bar R649f 

Roche, A. S.— The Wrong Wife R673w 

Rodney, G. B. — Coyote Currency R694c 

Rodney, G. B. The Vanishing Frontier R694v 

Rolvaag, 0. E. — Giants in the Earth R744g 

Ruck, B. — Dance Partner R911d 

Ruck, B. — The Subconscious Courtship R911su 

Ruck, B, — A Star in Love R911s 

Snow, C. H. — Six-guns of Sandoral S674si 

Terhune, A. P.— Unseen T3181u 

Thomson, B. — The Case of the Dead Diplomat T482c 

Titus, H.— Below zero 7623b9 

Todd, PL— So Free We Seem. T634s 

Tuttle, W. C.~Hashknife of Stormy River T9671h 

Tuttle, W. C— Rifled Gold T9671ri 

Tuttle, W. C— The Santa Dolores Stage T9671s 

Vance, J. L.— They Call it Love V2222t 

Wallace, E. — The Arran way's Mystery W188ar 

Wallace, E.— Calendar W188ca 

Wallace, E. — The Mystery of the Frightened Lady . . . W188my 

Wallace, E, — When the Gang Came to London W188v/h 

Wayne, P.— Substitute Sweetheart W359s 



—96— 

Webb, M. — Precious Bane W367p 

Wells, C— The Huddle W453h 

Widdemer, M. — Back to Virtue Betty W638ba 

Wiliams, V. — And So Victoria W6852s 

Williams, B. A. — Crucible W721c 

Williams, V. — Death Answers the Bell W727de 

Wilson, M. — The Law and the McLaughlins W7511 

Wodehouse, P. G. — Blanding's Castle W838bl 

Wright, H. B. —Exit W949ex 

Wright, H. B. — Ma Cinderella W949ma 

Wright, W. H. — The Kidnap Murder Case W954ki 

Wynne, A. — The Blue Vesuvius W988b 

Wynne, P. — A Dream Come True W989d 

Wynne, P. — Love Comes to Susan W9891 

Young, F. B. — Far Forest Y715f 

Young, G. — Red Clark of the Arrowhead Y72r 

JUVENILE 

Abbott, J. — A Row of Stars JA1322ro 

Abbott, J.— The Young Dalfreys JA1322y 

Artzybasheff, B. — Seven Simeons JA792s 

Bailey, C. S.— Tops and Whistles JB155t 

Baker, W. F.— Bob Dexter and the Red Auto Mystery . JB1682b 

Barbour, R. H.— Merritt Leads the Nine JB239m 

Bartlett, A. C— Pilgrim and Pluck JB2891pi 

Bemelmans, L. — The Castle No. 9 JB455c 

Bennett, R. — Shawneen and the Gander JB472sh 

Berry, E. — Homespun . JB5342h 

Bone, S.— The Little Boy and His House JB71221 

Bowman, J. C— Pecos Bill JB7871p 

Braune, A. — Honey Chile JB825h 

Buff, M.— Dancing Cloud JB929d 

Chatterton, E. K.— In Great Waters JC495i 

Coryell, H. V. — Lives of Danger and Daring JC8331 

Crownfield, G.— King's Pardon JC953k 

DeAngeli, M. — Henners Lydia JD283h 

DeAngeli, M. — Petite Suzanne JD283p 

Edwards, L.— Poppy Ott Hits the Trail JE262p 

Eskridge, R. L.-— Umi JE75u 



—97— 

Flack, M.— Walter the Lazy Mouse JF569w 

Gemmill, J. B.— Joan Wanted a Kitty JG323J 

Grove, H. P. — Adventurous Aliens afloat JB8831ad 

Grove, H. P. — Adventurous Marooned JB8831a 

Haines, D. H. — David and Jonathan JH152da 

Hall, E. G.— Up Creek and Down Creek JH175u 

Hark, A. — The Seminary's Secret JH2821s 

Hayes, M. — Wampum and Sixpence JH418w 

Hewes, A. D. — The Golden Sleeve JH598.go 

Heyliger, W. — Terry Hicks, Explorer JH617je 

Heyliger, W.— The Mill in the Woods JH617m 

Hope, L. L.- — The Bobbsey Twins Camping Out . . JH791bob23 
Hope, H. L. — Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue on 

Grand Pa's Farm JH791bm 

Jay, M. F.--The Sleep Bell Trail JJ42sl 

Knipe, E. B.— Lost a Brother JK691o 

Kristoffersen, E. M. — Hans Christian of Elsinore JK92h 

LaBelle, C— The Bailey TWins in the Philippines .... JLllGb 

Laveli, E. — The Girl Scout Director JL399gj 

Lee, M. H. — Marcos JL479m 

Lee, L. — The Snake Gods Treasure JL748s 

Lewis, E. F. — China Quest JL673co 

Lide, A. A. — Thord Firetooth JL714t 

McNeely, M. H.~¥/inning Out JM159w 

Mallett, G. E.— Private Props JM253p 

Means, F. C. — Penny for' Luck JM483p 

Moorehead, B. ¥/. — Nevv^ World Builders . JM819n 

Northrup, T. — Artie raider JN877a 

O'Brien, J. — Silver Chief to the Rescue J013si 

Parton, E. — Vinny Applegay JP274v 

Peattie, D. C— A Child's Story of the World JP3632c 

Petersham, M. — Story Book of Foods and Fields JP484sv 

Phillips, E. C— The Santa Glaus Brownies JP558s 

Ransome, A. — Pigeon Post JR212pi 

Ratzesberger, A. — Jasmine, a Story of Persia JR236J 

Righter, L. L.— Chatt Roland JR571c 

Robinson, M. L.— Bright Island JR663b 

Speed, N.— The Carter Girls of Carter House JS742c 

Speed, N. — Molly Brown's College Friends JS742m 

Sperry, A. — Wagons Westward JS751w 



—98— 

Stratton C. — Swords and Statues JS911s 

Theiss, L. E.— From Coast to Coast With the U. S. 

Air Mail JT376f u 

Thompson, J. G. — The Thompson Readers, 3 vols JT4731t 

Turpin, E.— Lost Covers JT957i 

Van Epps, M. T. — Nancy Pembroke in Nova Scotia . . . JV252na 

Wheeler, P. — Albanian Wonder Tales JW564a 

Winfield, A. M. — The Rover Boys in Business JW768rq 

Winfield, A. M.— The Rover Boys at Colby Hall JW768rp 

Winters, J. — Cornelias Customers JW788c 

Wright, A. R.— Barefoot Days JW947b 

Young, C. — The Motor Boys on the Wing JY69m 

Chandler, A. C. — Treasure Trails in Art J9C455t 

Kuhler, 0. — Portraits of the Iron Horse J9K96p 

REFERENCE 

Acts and Resolves Mass., 1936 

Annual Report Smithsonian Institution, 1936 

Encyclopedia Britanica, 24 vols. 

Manual General Court— Mass., 1937-8 

Journal, Senate — Mass. 

Journal, House — Mass. 

Proceedings, Encampment — G. A. R., 1937 

Proceedings, Encampment — American Legion, 1937 

Proceedings, Encampment — Mass., U. S. W. V., 1936 

Proceedings, Encampment — Mass. V. F. W., 1936 

Report, Librarian of Congress, 1936 

Year Book — Agriculture, U. S. 



—99— 



Accountant's Report 



$5,716.45 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the year 1937 : 

Expenditures 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Appropriation $5,500.00 

Transferred from Revenue Fund . . . 216.45 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 
Paid : 

Ralph W. Piper, Chairman, salary . . $200.00 

James E. Kinsley, salary 100.00 

Raymond F. Durkee, salary 100.00 

Middlesex County Selectmen's Assn. 

Memberships 6.00 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 119.75 

Virginia Milbery, postage 19.14 

Virginia Milbery, stationery 1.80 

Ralph W. Piper, traveling expenses . 5.50 
James E. Kinsley, traveling expenses 5.50 
James E. Kinsley, postage, supplies . .79 
Hobbs & Warren, Inc., licenses, sta- 
tionery 13.41 

Memorial Press, town reports 303.60 

— ^ $875.49 

COLLECTORS' DEPARTMENT 

Charles A. Durkee, salary $983.09 

Charles A. Durkee, postage 110.33 

Charles A. Durkee, searching records 
at Cambridge, 12 hrs., $6.00; car- 
fare, $3.60 9.60 

Murphy & Snyder, printing tax bills 53.35 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., blanks 16.62 

Charles A. Durkee, tax title expense 21.96 

$1,194.95 



—100— 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT 

Henry L. Haynes, salary $300.00 

Albert P. Durkee, salary 300.00 

Warren, H. Jones, salary 300.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., blanks, sup- 
plies 58.41 

L. L. Applin, transfers and cards . . . 19.47 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 9.75 

George R. Barnstead & Son, tax cards 1.00 
Robert S. Osterhout, street books . . 65.00 
Henry L. Haynes, attending meet- 
ings . 20.00 

Warren H. Jones, attending meetings 20.00 

Albert P. Durkee, attending meetings 15.00 
Henry L. Haynes, postage, telephone, 

express 15.09 

Henry L. Haynes, expenses to Mr. 

Long's office 5.00 

TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT 

Wm. Henry Soar, salary $500.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage 99.45 

Wm. Henry Soar, telephones 15.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, pens 1.50 

Wm. Henry Soar, certifying notes . . 4.00 

C. C. Cullinane, express .50 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., re- 
pairs 22.02 

Maynard Trust Co., box rental .... 5.50 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 18.86 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books, files . . 24.64 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Howard L. Jones, salary $400.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 12.72 

Murphy & Snyder, vouchers, war- 
rants, notices 34.85 

Remington Rand, Inc., ledger sheets 2.57 

Howard L. Jones, postage 15.00 



$1,128.72 



$691.47 



$465.14 



—.101— 

TOWN CLERK 

Horace F. Tuttle, salary $200.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording births, 

deaths, marriages 77.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, telephone 16.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, postage 18.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 2.75 

J. L. Fairbanks & Co., folders, bind- 
ers 10.80 

Robinson Seal Co., cards 1.06 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., binder 2.05 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 

James Kinsley, officer, 1936-1937 . . $6.00 

Havelock Schnair, officer 3.00 

Peter Duggan, officer 3.00 

Fred S. Whitcomb, officer 3.00 

Theron A. Lowden, officer 3.00 

Clare A. Milbery, officer 3.00 

James P. Brown, officer 3.00 

Thomas Murray, officer 3.00 

George E. Murphy, officer 3.00 

Leo McCarthy, officer 9.00 

Arthur W. Lee, registrar and re- 
count, 1936-37 42.00 

Albert P. Durkee, moderator 35.00 

Com. of Mass., voting booths 36.00 

Universalist Church, rent 5.00 

Clarence Braman, work on booths . . 1.25 

Enterprise Press, notices 2.40 

Oliver D. Wood, work on booths .... 1.25 

West Acton Woman's Club, rent ... 5.00 
James E. Kinsley, moving voting 

equipment 5.50 

Robert S. Osterhout, advertising. ... 2.24 
Murphy & Snyder, warrants, ballots, 

etc 54.00 

Daniel W. Sheehan, registrar 20.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, clerk of registrars 25.00 



$327.66 



$273.64 



—102— 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Clare Milbery, salary and transpor- 
tation 

Robinson Seal Co., seals 

Boston Stencil and Stamp Works, 
steel stamps 

Wm. Henry Soar, lock 

Clare Milbery, 2 days' expense to 
convention 

Clare Milbery, postage and telephone 



$200.00 
3.69 

6.85 
1.50 

9.50 
.69 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Carl Backman, chairman $125.00 

Raymond L. Hatch, salary 75.00 

Mary M. Laffin, salary 75.00 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF AGENT 
Waldo J. Flint, salary 



CATTLE INSPECTOR 
E. E. Allsopp, salary 



Total General Government 
Unexpended balance 



$222.23 



$275.00 
$50.00 
125.00 



$5,629.30 

87.15 

$5,716.45 



TREASURER'S AND COLLECTOR'S BOND 



Appropriation 

Paid: 
C. A. Durkee, premiums 
Unexpended balance . . . 



$250.00 



$248.00 
2.00 



$250.00 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 50.00 



$1,550.00 



Paid: 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. 



$57.45 



—103— 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., oil 220.72 

Boston Eaison Co 132.54 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 32.70 

Oliver D. Wood, janitor 234.50 

Oliver D. Wood, repairs and making 

screens 28.68 

Oliver D. Wood, work on grounds . . 11.50 

Oliver D. Wood, care of clock 52.00 

S. D. Taylor, supplies 3.24 

M. W. Barteaux, wood 44.00 

A. W. Davis Co., wax, rakes 9.30 

Ernest Knippel, setting glass and 

trucking ashes 2.25 

Arthur Freese, repairs 3.00 

West and South Water Supply 12.00 

B. A. King, repairs 10.25 

A. W. Haynes, labor 5.00 

New England Toro Co., power mower 300.00 
Parker Hardware Co., screen ma- 
terial! 12.42 

W"m. P. Proctor Co., lumber 9.04 

Hosea Gould, trucking rubbish .... 2.00 

John Pederson, cement work 53.00 

George C. Turner, repairs 10.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas 4.86 

Spencer Taylor, mowing 98.50 

Eastern Lumber Co., wood 10.00 

Wilho Anderson, cleaning ashes, la- 
bor on boiler 5.37 

Acton Piper Co., condenser valve and 

labor 11.94 

Com. of Mass., boiler inspection .... 15.00 
W. A. Rayner, care common at E. 

Acton 10.00 

W. A. Freeman, service on oil burn- 
er, changing thermostat 7.50 

W. Charter, labor 16.00 

Thomas Murray, labor 20.00 

Fred W. Green, care of common, W. 

Acton 6.83 



—104— 

Fred W. Green, paid for resetting 

tablet 1.50 

So. Acton Woolen Co., boiler tube . . 4.75 

Georg-e Noyes, paper 1.32 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal . . 78.50 

E. P, Gates, chair irons 1.75 

Mass. Reformatory, furniture 8.00 

$1,547.41 

Unexpended balance 2.59 



$2,374.62 
Unexpended balance 125.38 



$1,550.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Paid: 
Michael Foley, salary and trans- 
portation $2,100.00 

Robert Willett, services 43.50 

George Braman, services 65.38 

Charles A. Durkee, services 3.00 

Norman Perkins, services 15.85 

George Horton, services 3.00 

Louis Leveroni, salary 3.75 

M. Linskey & Bro., uniform and 

equipment 57.25 

Edison Electric 111. Co 9.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel, Co 61.39 

Murphy & Snyder, blanks 9.50 

Parker Hardware Co., cartridges . . 3.00 



$2,500.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $2,800.00 

Paid: 

Annual Pay Rolls . . $460.00 

N. E. Tel & Tel. Co 94.22 

Boston Edison Co 171.94 

J. G. Flynn, towel service 13.00 



—105— 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal . . 167.72 

Geo. H. Reed, coal 178.79 

Geo. H. Reed, peat moss 2.50 

Ivar Peterson, janitor 120.00 

Lyle Reynolds, janitor 120.00 

Wm. G. Lawrence 127.75 

West and South Water District, 36.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas 11.05 

Pay rolls, for fires 416.85 

Acton Motor Co. : 

Repairs, parts, labor 70.04 

Gas, oil, grease 19.37 

Inspection 4.00 

Pressure gage 2.50 

Charger 10.75 

Air hose 8.75 

Filter 1.50 

Battery 25.00 

Waltham Plate Glass Co., windshield 8.00 
Hayward & FuUonton, planing cylin- 
der heads 3.00 

So. Acton News Co., paper 1.00 

Jean Garceau, wiring 10.05 

David Clayton, labor and material, 

water hole 13.00 

Clarence Robbins, trucking 3.50 

Ralph Jones, trucking 1.50 

R. S. Osterhout, cards .1. 25.00 

Seagrave Corp., screw base 2.65 

Wm. B. Holt, smoke pipe and closet 

seat 13.44 

B. A. King, fixture 2.00 

Acton Pipe Co., boiler seal and labor 8.00 

R. M. Prentiss, socket and labor .... 5.25 

John Pederson, gas and express .... 3.80 

Edwin A. Anderson, repairing boiler 24.70 

Lowdens, gloves 2.50 

Koehler Mfg. Co., spotlight and 

charger 24.85 

Lawrence W. Clark, steel hose basket 15.00 



—106— 

Maydale Beverage Co., distilled water 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas 

J. S. Moore, supplies 

E. P. Gates, irons 

So. Acton Woolen Co., acid . 

Maynard & Acton Oil Co., gas 

R. S. Baker, gas 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, paint . . 

Belmont Supply Co., supplies 

Justin A. McCarthy, master twin Si- 
amese 

Justin A. McCarthy, nozzle 

Justin A, McCarthy, coat and pants 

Justin A. McCarthy, repairing hose. . 

A. W. Davis Co., outfits 

A. W. Davis Co., coal 

A. W. Davis Co., supplies 

E. F. Hayward, repairing clock, 
whistle inspection 

W. S. Darley & Co., coats 

Gorham Fire Equipment, masks .... 

Ayer Motor Express 

Acton Motor Co., postage, express . . 

Unexpended balance 



2.25 
2.33 
2.00 
6.75 
5.37 
1.43 
1.39 
2.53 
18.40 

55.35 
43.13 
19.68 
22.15 
144.90 
35.48 
11.39 

5.25 

84.43 
67.50 

1.88 
8.34 



$2,770.90 
29.10 



$2,800.00 



FOREST FIRES 

Appropriation 

Paid : 

H. J. Schnair, painting tanks $12.00 

Acton Motor Co., repairs 3.15 

John Pederson, gas . 1.17 

Pay rolls 355.60 

$371.92 
Unexpended balance 128.08 



$500.00 



$500.00 



—107— 

NEW HOSE 
Fire Department 

Appropriation $250.00 

Paid: 

Justin A. McCarthy Co $248.00 

Unexpended balance 2.00 $250.00 

FOREST FIRES 

Appropriation $200.00 

Paid : 

Justin A. McCarthy Co $199.95 

Unexpended balance .05 $200.00 



WHISTLE AT WEST ACTON 

Appropriation! $1,500.00 

Paid: 
Louis W. Bills $1,500.00 



HYDRANT RENTAL 

Appropriation $3,128.00 

Paid: 

West and South Water Supply $2,875.00 

Town of Concord 253.00 $3,128.00 



MOTH DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund 300.00 $1,300.00 

Paid : 
Fitzhenry Guptill Co., strainer 

and parts 4.94 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 2.00 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., hose. . 13.41 

B. F. Goodrich Co., suction hose .... 17.14 

E. P. Gates, irons 1.50 

Murphy & Snyder, notices 4.50 

Acton Motor Co., labor, gas, muffler 17.61 

Sunshine Feed Store, lead 182.40 

Ellis Chemical Co., cassein spreader 14.00 

J. S. Moore, twine .50 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 27.84 



—108— 

James J. Knight, labor 475.10 

James J. Knight, truck 198.11 

James J. Knight, telephone 2.70 

James J. Knight, oil 1.25 

Richard Sisson, labor 42.25 

George Morse, labor 51.75 

David Clayton, labor 3.25 

James Conquest, labor 2.00 

Hugh Hodgen, labor 23.25 

Harold Knight, labor 5.25 

Daniel Cullinane, labor 135.00 

Ole Granberg, labor 74.25 $1,300.00 

TREE WARDEN 

Appropriation $500.00 

Paid: 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber $1.40 

Parker Hardware Co., saw 2.49 

Sudbury Nurseries, maples 24.75 

H. E. Day, filing saws 2.10 

Hugh Hodgen, filing saws and labor • 5.45 

D. L. Parmenter, ladder 6.85 

E. P. Gates, irons 2.00 

James J. Knight, labor 251.70 

James J. Knight truck 106.03 , 

James J. Knight, telephone, postage . . .80 

James J. Knight, hack saw .65 

James H. Conquest, labor 74.25 

Harold Knight, labor 6.00 

J. A. Wessells, labor 2.00 

David Clayton, labor 8.00 

George Morse, labor 2.00 

Frank Braman, labor 3.50 

$499.97 

Unexpended balance .03 $500.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Appropriations $2,500.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 23.63 $2,523.63 



—109— 

Paid : 
Ohio Chemical & Mfg. Co., rental of 

oxygen tents $491.00 

Emerson Hospital 122.45 

Ruth E. Hall, prof, services 150.00 

Marian L. Piper, prof, services .... 60.00 

Lydia Rhodes, prof, services 24.00 

R. B. Hamilton, prof, services 30.00 

Alice Provasoli, prof, services ...... 12.00 

Dr. O. L. Clark, prof, services 584.50 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, prof, services .... 15.00 

Horace Tuttle, surveying 10.00 

Enterprise Press, adv 2.10 

R. S. Osterhout, adv 2.48 

Turner's Public Spirit, adv 2.00 

George H. Reed, posts, wire 9.75 

W. A. Twombly, ambulance 5.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., book and 

permits 7.03 

Murphy & Snyder, letterheads .... 8.90 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe, fittings, labor. . 6.65 
Gorham Fire Equipment Co., fire 

pump 158.85 

Alfred A. Minahan, prescription .... 1.50 

C. A. Durkee, services, permits .... 48.60 

telephones 2.20 

expenses to Boston . . 2.50 

Paid for labor at dump 124.75 

Parke Davis Co., vaccine 77.26 

James Kinsley, inspection 23.40 

William Munn, inspection 7.80 

Edward Hurley, labor 145.00 

Dr. E. A. Mayell, prof, services .... 50.00 

A. W. Davis Co., tools, paint 4.21 

Acton Motor Co., gas 13.19 

Middlesex County Sanatorium .... 18.00 

E. E. Allsopp, labor 204.25 

E. E, Allsopp, paid out for labor. . . . 11.25 
E. E. Allsopp, investigating com- 
plaints and issuing permits 26.00 



—110— 

E. E. Allsopp, postage, tel., express. . 1.51 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, salary 25.00 

Dr. O. L. Clark, paid for clerk 20.00 

Lillian Taylor, salary 15.00 

$2,523.13 

Unexpended balance .50 $2,523.63 

TOWN NURSE 

Appropriation $2,200.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund 102.50 $2,302.50 



Paid: 
Genevieve Greeley, salary and trans- 
portation $2,000.15 

Lydia Rhodes 166.68 

Albert Noll, supplies 38.84 

J. Stoler, supplies 36.84 

Diadem Co., supplies 28.46 

Thomas W. Reed Co., suppHes .... 26.75 

Mead & Wheeler Co., folders, forms 4.78 $2,302.50 

HIGHWAYS 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

State Aid Chapter 81 8,850.00 

State Aid Chapter 90 1,400.00 

County Aid Chapter 90 2,000.00 $24,250.00 

Paid : 
Acton Motor Company, Cutting and 

welding $8.60 

Standard Oil of New York, asphalt 6,337.28 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 38.79 
No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., gravel 209.82 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 72.39 

H. E. Day, sharpening saws 4.80 

Geo. H. Reed, bags 2.50 

A. W. Davis Co., paint 24.85 

Berger Metal Culvert Co 86.24 



—Ill- 
Am. Cyanamid & Chemical Co., dyna- 
mite 12.50 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., kerosene, gas 59.89 

Mass. Broken Stone Co 56.80 

Edna Downey, sand 126.94 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 84.70 

John Anderson, gravel 21.20 

Ole Granberg, gravel 32.40 

Laffin's Express 2.30 

New England Fence Co., cable guard 726.40 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., pipe . . 1.25 

Wilson Lumber Co., brick 10.50 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil, grease 17.66 

Pierce's Express .50 

J. S. Moore, twine, paint 14.15 

State Prison Colony, guard posts . . 125.00 
State Prison, frames, grates, re- 
flectors ,. 52.38 

Wesley Larrabee, bags 2.25 $8,132.09 



PAY ROLLS 
Labor : 
A. H. Perkins, Supt. and truck .... $1,971.00 

W. Larrabee 868.80 

H. Scribner 501.05 

W. Charter 476.60 

J. Sisson • 567.60 

L. A. Godfrey 17.60 

P. Coughlin 393.80 

T. Newsham 48.50 

N. DiGracomandrea 402,60 

Wm. Bradley . 547.00 

C. Whitcomb 464.00 

G. Rugg 535.00 

Wm. Kelly 502.50 

D. CulHnane 137.50 

A. Munson 84.00 

L. Leveroni 405.00 

A. Marsh 93.75 

E. Hall 100.00 



—112— 

R. Penney 22.50 

W. Lawrence 20.00 

A. Dubey . 64.00 

L. Stiles 94.00 

T. Murray 80.00 

W. Taylor 16.00 

T. Cole 12.00 

J. Gallant 12.00 

A. Beech 12.00 

W. Scanlon 16.00 

F. Braman . 24.75 

$8,489.55 
Trucks : 

H. Gould $807.75 

Mrs. C. Kingsley 1,288.50 

E. A. Anderson 1,019.50 

R. Jones 1,110.00 

C. Robbins 1,527.00 

L. W. Perkins 1,185.00 

L. Boeske, shovel 128.00 

A. W. Davis 19.50 

J. Briggs 16.50 

Geo. Morse 19.50 

G. H. Reed 12.00 

Town of Acton, roller 401.90 

$7,535.15 

Total Highways . $24,156.79 

Unexpended balance 93.21 



$24,250.00 



MAIN STREET 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

State Aid Chapter 90 3,500.00 

County Aid Chapter 90 2,500.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund .12 $8,500.12 



—US- 



Paid: 

Mass. Broken Stone Co. 

Standard Oil of N. Y 

Ida Gagnon, gravel 

New England Fence Co., cable guard 

State Prison Colony, rail posts .... 

Samuel J. Tomasello Corp., rental and 
transportation of asphalt spreader 
and roller 

Labor : 
A. H. Perkins, Supt. and truck .... 

W. Larrabee 

C. Whitcomb 

L. Leveroni 

Geo. Rugg . 

R. Penney 

W. Charter 

Paul Coughlin 

A. Dubey 

John Sisson . 

Wm. Bradley 

Wm. Kelly 

E. Hall 

A. Morrison 

H. Scribner 

Lester Stiles 

Wm. Scanlon 

Elmer Biggs 

Thomas Yetman 

A. Marsh 

Trucks : 

R. Jones 

L. Perkins 

Mrs. C. Kingsley 

E. A. Anderson 

H. Gould 

C. Robbins 

Geo. Morse 



$2,899.03 
218.15 
228.15 
341.86 
125.00 



478.78 $4,290.9f7 



$378.00 
310.70 
181.70 
182.50 
133.00 
4.00 
179.90 
156.10 

93.30 
151.10 
145.00 
139.00 
104.50 

87.00 
110.70 
117.80 

12.00 

28.00 

3.00 

131.60 



$232.50 

195.00 

258.00 

159.75 

42.00 

24.00 

12.00 



$2,648.90 



—114— 



H. 0. Hartwell, shovel 

Town of Acton, roller 


288.00 
349.00 






• 


$1,560.25 




$8,500.12 



HIGH STREET 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

State Aid Chapter 90 1,400.00 

County Aid Chapter 90 1,600.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 25.00 $4,025.00 



Paid : 

Berger Metal Culvert Co., arch pipe $724.42 

N. E. Concrete Pipe Corp., pipe .... 28.46 
No. Middlesex Washed Sand & Gravel 

Co., rental air compresser 45.60 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement 164.38 

State Prison, posts 81.25 $1,044.11 



Labor : 

A. H. Perkins, Supt. and truck $202.50 

W. Larabee 91.20 

C. Whitcomb 122.50 

Geo. Rug-g- 106.50 

Wm. Bradley 102.50 

Paul Coughlin 38.00 

Wm. Kelly 46.00 

John Sisson 106.50 

L. Leveroni 112.50 

W. Charter 130.50 

H. Scribner 98.50 

Wm. Scanlon 134.50 

Thomas Murray 72.50 

Lester Stiles 82.50 

E. Hall 10.00 

A. Marsh 26.00 



$1,482.70 



—115- 



Trucks : 






C. Robbins 


$158.25 




E. A. Anderson 


117.75 




R. Jones 


128.25 




Mrs. C. Kingsley 


70.50 




L. Perkins 


118.50 




A. Jalonen 


65.25 




H. Gould 


57.75 




Geo. Morse 


45.75 




L. Boeske shovel 


599.44 
25.00 




Town of Acton roller 










pump 


111.75 








$1,498.19 




$4,025.00 



SNOW REMOVAL 

Appropriation $1,200.00 

Paid: 

Laffin's Express $ .75 

Anderson Engineering Co., parts . . 25.97 

George H. Reed, plow 12.00 

E. W. Systrom Co., parts 19.45 

Conant Machine Co., bolts 1.26 

Labor 300.70 

Trucks 329.63 

Edwin H. Christofferson, ploughing 48.75 

Davis Motor Co., ploughing 44.00 

Mrs. Henry Mekkelsen, ploughing . . 27.00 

John Pederson, ploughing 63.00 

L. W. Perkins, ploughing 42.00 

George H, Reed, ploughing 33.00 

E. P. Gates, repairs 5.10 

$952.61 

Unexpended balance 247.39 

— $1,200.00 



—116— 

STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Paid: 

Boston Edison Co $3,248.85 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., rental air compressor 3.00 

B. A. King, installing new island 

light at Center 50.00 

$3,301.85 

Unexpended balance 198.15 

$3,500.00 



LIBRARY MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation $900.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 19.04 

Paid : 

A. F. Davis, librarian $81.00 

A. F. Davis, janitor 51.00 

A. F. Davis, rebinding books 30.29 

A. F. Davis, writing cards 9.40 

A. F. Davis, postage 1.20 

A. F. Davis, cataloguing . 10.00 

A. F. Davis, paid for removing rub- 
bish 1.50 

A. E. Davis, repairing roof 5.00 

Ralph Rogers, asst. janitor 104.25 

Frances Fairbanks, asst. librarian . . 69.75 

Boston Cons. Gas Co 270.56 

Boston Edison Co 41.01 

B. A. King, installing service 96.06 

Smith & Dunivan, repairs 20.95 

Hy-Gien Laboratories 2.50 

Chester Robbins, insurance 61.22 

Dennison Mfg. Co., labels 2.20 

John Pederson, tankage 11.10 

John Pederson, labor 3.00 

West and South Water Supply 12.00 



$919.04 



—117— 

Remington Rand Co., cards 4.55 

R. S. Osterhout, labels 15.00 

Mrs. 0. D. Wood, asst. Librarian . . . 14.00 

C, E. Smith, work on boiler ... .... 1.50 

LIBRARY BOOKS 

Appropriation $200.00 

Received from library fund 297.77 

Paid: 

Enterprise Press $1.00 

DeWolfe Fiske & Co 123.81 

Junior Literary Guild 101.95 

Jean Kam 20.88 

H. R. Huntting Co 155.46 

W. A. Wilde Co. 12.19 

Robert S. Osterhout 1.50 

Houghton Miimin Co 16.51 

Geo. H. B. Turner 2.00 

Harold A. Sandstrom 4.25 

National Republic 2.00 

Ernest H. Washburn 1.00 

Womraths Book Shops 12.47 

Herman Goldberger Agency ....... 41.75 

The Commentator 1.00 

CEMETERIES 

Appropriation $800.00 

Transferred from Cemetery Land 

Fund 300.00 

Paid : 

H. J. Schnair, glass, putty, labor . . $9.95 

Geo. H. Reed, fertilizer 134.69 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas 1.33 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 26.16 

Acton Pipe Co., labor 8.00 

Holmerden Co., weed killer 53.90 

A. W. Davis Co., fertilizers, rakes . . 6.35 



$919.04 



$497.77 



$497.77 



$1,100.00 



—118— 

A. Bately & Son, flowers 34.20 

Sudbury Nurseriesi 25.00 

H. F. Tuttle, compiling' report, writ- 
ing, and recording deeds 26.00 

West and South Water District .... 6.00 

F. W. Green, labor 266.52 

F. W. Green, horse 50.00 

F. W. Green, dressing 3.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 152.00 

Duncan S. Kennedy, labor 139.00 

Howard F. Jones, labor 151.50 

$1,093.60 
Unexpended balance 6.40 $1,100.00 

SUSAN HOSMER FUND 

Received Interest on Fund $4,721.75 

Received Refund Boston Edison Co. 16.02 $4,737.77 



Paid : 

Sidney Schurcliff, prof, services .... $99.70 

Geo. E. Greenough Road Construction 2,008.00 
Greenough Bros. Inc., grading, laying 

pipe and loam 128.00 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 64.80 

Sudbury Nurseries Inc 102.50 

Ellis Chemical Co., lead 11.04 

James J. Knight, spraying 27.75 

Conant Machine Co., paint 5.15 

A. W. Davis Co., paint 1.00 

Thomas J. Grey Co., lawn seed .... 7.84 

Tony Perry, spraying 5.77 

Boston Edison Co., service to chapel 186.91 

E. L. Willard, humus 15.00 

West and South Water District, 

service to chapel 197.35 

West and South Water District water 27.63 

E. P. Gates, basin cover 4.75 

H. E. Fletcher Co., granite veneer. . 10.00 

H. F. Tuttle, stakes 3.00 



—119— 

Wesley Larrabee, labor 4.80 

Town of Acton, roller 15.20 

Charles E. Whitcomb, labor 22.00 

R. Jos. Marsters, labor 22.00 

Ronald Nealey, labor 18.00 

Edward Hall, labor 6.00 

Robert Smith, labor 4.00 

Hosea Gould, grading 846.20 

Fred W. Green, labor 181.38 

Fred W. Green, horse 38.25 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 223.50 

Duncan Kennedy, labor 206.70 

Howard F. Jones, labor .......... 171.75 

Ole Granberg, labor 41.40 

Charles Farris, labor 30.40 

PERPETUAL CARE 

Balance Jan. 1, 1937 $30.00 

Received Interest from Blanchard 

fundsi 25.00 

Received Interest from Cemetery 

funds / . 1,148.00 

Paid: 

F. W. Green, balance Jan. 1 $30.00 

F. W. Green, care of lots 1,148.00 

F. W. Green, care of Blanchard lot. . 25.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 
Appropriation 

Paid: 

Adelaide Briggs, dinners $60.00 

West Acton Woman's Club, rent .... 5.00 

Boston Regalia Co., flags 3.00 

Disabled Ex-Servicemen's Exchange, 

flags 9.92 

Avery B. Smith, cars 20.00 

A. H. Howe, flowers 26.32 

G. H. Finan, flowers 20.72 



$4,737.77 



$1,203.00 



$1,203.00 



$275.00 



Newton Post Band 100.00 

Lovell Bus Lines, buses — 30.00 



$274.96 
Unexpended balance .04 $275.00 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 
Appropriated balance $300.00 

Paid: 
Thos. Leighton Register of Deed . . $2.51 

Wm. Henry Soar, expenses to Boston 

and East Cambridge 5.00 

$7.51 
Unexpended balance $292.49 $300.00 

ZONING COMMITTEE 

Appropriation $25.00 

Paid: 

Spaulding Moss Co., photos $9.78 

Enterprise Press adv 1.05 

News Enterprise, adv .72 

$11.55 
Unexpended balance 13.45 $25.00 

MACHINERY FUND 

Appropriation $300.00 

Received from Town of Acton Rental 791.00 $1,091.00 

Paid : 

Acton Motor Co., repairs $49.22 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 35.29 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas, oil 139.26 

Conant Machine Co., parts ........ 11.34 

J. S. Moore, tools 5.50 

A. H. Perkins, paint, brush 1.33 

Buffalo Springfield Roller Co., parts 41.00 

Parker Danner Co., rakes .. .... ^ 7.40 

George H. Reed, tools .... ........ 17.50 



—121— 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., drag .... 17.25 

Vanderhoof Hardware Co., tools .... 3.25 

Parker Hardware Co., tools 9.58 

Dyer Sales & Machinery Co., tools . . 7.50 

N, E. Road Machinery Co., blade . . 10.20 

MacPhersons, tools 2.00 

E. P. Gates, repairs 76.65 

$434.27 
Balance $656.73 $1,091.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Appropriation $6,500.00 

Paid: 

Town cases $3,447.65 

Other Towns 332.03 $3,779.68 



ADMINISTRATION 

Virgina Milbery, clerk $126.10 

Virginia Milbery, postage 1.83 

Glenna Bradley aiding auditors .... 8.00 

Hobbs & Warrent Inc., blanks 13.84 

R. S. Osterhout, envelopes 7.25 

Carl Backman, adm. expense 50.00 $207.02 



$3,986.70 
Unexpended balance $2,513.30 

$8,500.00 

STATE AID 

Appropriation $500.00 

Paid: $240.00 

Unexpended balance 260.00 $500.00 

MILITARY AID 

Appropriation $200.00 

Paid: $76.00 

Unexpended balance 124.00 $200.00 



—122— 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF 

Approtpriation $1,200.00 

Paid : 

Orders of Soldiers' Relief Agent $1,031.74 

Mass. Soldiers' Relief Assn. Member- 
ship 2.00 

Waldo J. Flint travelling expense . . 12.05 

$1,045.79 
Unexpended balance 154.21 $1,200.00 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation $600.00 

Received Federal Grant 434.66 

Amt. due on a/c federal grant 94.66 $1,129.32 

Paid : 
Orders of Board of Public Welfare $1,112.83 
Appropriation balance 16.49 $1,129.32 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Appropriation $9,000.00 

Balance Jan. 1, 1937 1,891.16 

Received Federal Grant 9,391.25 

Amt. due a/c Federal Grant 1,903.25 $22,185.66 

Paid: $21,250.79 

Appropriation balance 934.87 $22,185.66 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT 

Received Federal Grant $313.00 , 

Amt. due on a/c Federal Grant 63.43 $376.43 

Paid : 

Virginia Milbery, clerk $23.60 

Virginia Milbery, trip to Concord . . 1.00 
Hobbs & Warren Inc., blanks, bills. . 26.67 
Wm. Henry Soar, expenses to Cam- 
bridge 4.00 



i 



—123— 

Howard Wilson, prof, services .... 15.00 

Carl Backman, adm. expense 265.00 

$335.27 
Balance due Jan. 1, 1937 3.71 

$338.98 
Appropriation balance 37.45 $376.43 

EDUCATION 

Appropriation $46,000.00 

Paid: 

Orders of School Committee (see re- 
port) $45,994.58 

Unexpended balance 5.42 $46,000.00 

LIABILITY INSURANCE 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Paid : 
Theron A. Lowden, premiums .... $943.96 

Unexpended balance 56.04 $1,000.00 

HIGH SCHOOL INSURANCE 

Appropriation $1,425.22 

Paid : 
C. A. Durkee, premiums $1,425.22 

COUNTY HOSPITAL ASSESSMENT 

Appropriation $694.18 

Paid: 
Middlesex County $694.18 

DOG OFFICER 

Appropriation , $200.00 

Paid : 
Fraser Kennels, boarding and dispos- 
ing of 48 dogs $192.00 

Unexpended balance 8.00 $200.00 



—124— 

W. P. A. PROJECTS 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Paid : 

So. Acton Improvement Assn., rent $186.71 

James J. Knight, truck 156.00 

James J. Knight, oil, postage, tel. . . 3.40 
Wm. Henry Soar, sponsors agent . . 185.00 
Clare Milbery, messenger service . . 14.25 
Carl Backman, trips to Lowell, Marl- 
boro and Boston 64.30 

Carl Backman, telephone 4.60 

Singer Sewing Machine Co., repairs . . 7.50 
Avery & Murphy brushes and labor. , 2.30 
Treasurer, U. S. A. on account of ex- 
pense. Surplus Commodity Division 46.36 

John Anderson, gravel 51.60 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 99.60 

So. Acton Dept. Store, needles, pat- 
terns 1.85 

Town Shop, needles, patterns 3.55 

J. S. Moore, trips to Lowell and Marl- 
boro 12.25 

J. S. Moore, supplies 3.30 

James Huggins Son, creosote 23.44 

Standard Oil of N. Y., asphalt 248.40 

Berger Metal Culvert Co 44.28 

L. P. Boeske, shovel 723.00 

Labor 60.00 

Trucks 294.00 



$2,235.69 
' Unexpended balance transferred 
to Work Relief account as 
Voted at Town Meeting, Nov. 
1, 1937 ....••• $2,764.31 $5,000.00 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Appropriation : ... . • . $400.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 225.00 $625.00 



Paid: 

So. Acton Dept. Store, flags, bulbs. . $18.40 

John A. Sargent, picture auto accident 10.00 
C. A. Durkee, premium on bond for 

Deputy Collector 10.00 

C. A. Durkee, robbery insurance . . 16.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, plans 18.00 

State Prison, highway signs ...... 149.10 

H. F. Tuttle, releases 5.00 

John J. Donohue, prof, services . . 10.00 

0. D. Wood, care of flag 5.00 

Middlesex County, tuition 12.29 

Frances Hurley, et al, land damages 125.00 
Howard Wilson, services a/c Hurley 

case 100.00 

R, S. Osterhout, advertisement and 

traffic rules 94.68 

$573.47 

Unexpended balance 51.53 $625.00 



NOTES AND BONDS 

Appropriation $5,500.00 

Paid: 

Merchants National Bank, high school 

bonds $4,000.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, Fire Truck Note. . 1,500.00 $5,500.00 

INTEREST ON NOTES AND BONDS 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Paid : 

Merchants' National Bank, interest 

on High School Bonds $840.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, interest on Fire 

Truck Notes 105.00 

$945.00 

Unexpended Balance 55.00 

$1,000.00 



—126— 

REVENUE LOANS 

Amount Outstanding Jan. 1, 1937 . . $45,000.00 
Received Merchants' National Bank 35,000.00 

$80,000.00 

Paid: 

Susan Hosmer Cemetery Fund .... $10,000.00 

First National Bank of Ayer 35,000.00 

Merchants' National Bank 10,000.00 

Amount Outstanding Dec. 31, 1937 25,000.00 

$80,000.00 

INTEREST ON REVENUE LOANS 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Paid: 
Susan Hosmer Cemetery Fund .... $150.00 

First National Bank of Ayer 525.00 

Merchants' National Bank 42.50 

$717.50 
Unexpended Balance 782.50 

$1,500.00 

REFUNDS 

1937 Tax S4.35 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 227.45 

$232.30 

RESERVE FUND 

Appropriation from Overlay Surplus $1,000.00 

Transferred to: 

General Government $216.45 

Library Maintainance 19.04 

Main Street .12 

Tov^n Nurse 102.50 

Health 23.63 

High Street . 25.00 

Buildings and Grounds 50.00 



—127— 

Moth Deptartment 300.00 

Unclassified 225.00 

$961.74 
Unexpended Balance to Overlay 

Surplus 38.26 

$1,000.00 

CEMETERY LAND FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1937 |1,010.00 

Received for Lots Sold 291.00 

$1,301.00 

Transferred to Cemetery Account . . 300.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1937 1,001.00 

$1,301.00 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX REVENUE 

Balance January 1, 1937 . $3,785.18 

1937 Tax 7,791.63 

1934 Added Tax 2.66 

1933 Adjustment .06 

$11,579.53 

Debit : 

Abatements $284.25 

Total Amount Collected 1937 . . 7,238.47 

Balance December 31, 1937 4,056.81 

$11,579.53 

OVERLAYS 

1935 

Balance January 1, 1937 $3,422.62 

Debit : 

Abatements $426.58 

Transferred to Overlay Surplus . . . 2,996.04 

$3,422.62 



• —128— 

1936 

Balance January 1, 1937 $3,462.49 

Debit: 

Abatements $78.75 

Balance December 31, 1937 3,383.74 

$3,462.49 

1937 

Overlay $3,502.98 

Debit: 

Abatements $480.80 

Refunds 4.85 

Balance December 31, 1937 3,017.33 

$3,502.98 



OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Balance January 1, 1937 $9,057.65 

Transferred from 1935 Overlay .... 2,996.04 
Unexpended Balance from Re- 
serve Fund . 38.28 

$12,091.95 

Debit: 
Appropriation to Reserve Fund .... $1,000.00 

Balance December 31, 1937 11,091.95 

S12,091.95 



SURPLUS ACCOUNT 

Balance January 1, 1937 $26,610.78 

Surplus Revenue 1937 9,610.83 

Tax Title Revenue 2,169.24 

S38,390.85 

Debit: 
Appropriation Health Department . . $1,500.00 
Appropriation Zoning Committee . . 25.00 

Adjustment 1.80 

Balance December 31, 1937 36,864.05 

$38,390.85 



-129— 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Amount Due from Collector, Decemr 

ber 31, 1936 

Received State Tax 

State Parks 

Overlay 

Tovi^n Grant 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 

County Tax 

Added 1933 Tax 

Added 1934 Excise Tax 

Added 1937 Tax 



Treasurer Cash on Hand, December 

31, 1936 

Received Interest on Taxes 

Received Costs on Taxes 

Receipts Other Than Taxes 



Paid : 

State Tax 

State Park Tax 

County Tax 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Dog Tax , 

General Government 

Buildings and Grounds 

Police 

Fire Department 

Forest Fires 

Moth Work 

Tree Warden 

Health 

Town Nurse 

Highways 



$45,361.88 




6,900.00 




67.61 




3,502.98 




87,296.80 




7,791.63 


" 


6,097.78 




.06 




2.68 




93.00 






$157,114.40 




$49,254.73 




1,701.98 




65.10 




117,830.83 






168,852.64 






$325,967.04 



$7,350.00 

98.23 

6,167.67 

694.18 

792.20 

5,629.30 

1,547.41 

2,374.62 

2,770.90 

371,92 

1,300.00 

499.97 

2,523.13 

2,302.50 

24,156.79 



—ISO- 
Main Street 8,500.12 

High Street 4,025.00 

W. P. A 2,235.69 

Street Lighting 3,301.85 

State Aid 240.00 

Military Aid 76.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,045.79 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,112.83 

Public Welfare 3,986.70 

Old Age Assistance 21,250.79 

Aid Age Assistance, Administration 

Account 335.27 

Education 45,994.58 

Redemption of Tax Titles 7.51 

Zoning Committee 11.55 

Machinery Fund . 434.27 

Snow Removal 952.61 

Fire Whistle, West Acton 1,500.00 

Insurance of High School Building 1,425.22 

Library Maintainance 919.04 

Library Books 497.77 

Cemeteries 1,093.60 

Cemeteries, Perpetual Care 1,203.00 

Cemeteries, Hosmer Fund . 4,737.77 

New Hose, Fire Department 248,00 

New Hose, Forest Fire Department 199.95 

Treasurer's and Collector's Bonds . . 248.00 

Memorial Day 274.96 

Liability Insurance 943.96 

Hydrants ^ 3,128.00 

Unclassiiied 573.47 

Notes and Bonds 5,500.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 945.00 

Revenue Loans 55,000.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 717.50 

Dog Officer 192.00 

Refunds on Taxes 232.30 

Trust Funds • 10,000.00 



$241,668.92 



—131— 

Tax Titles . $1,446.62 

Abatements 1,270.38 

Judgments 502.62 

Amount due from Collector, Decem- 
ber 31, 1937 , 49,898.75 

Amount due from Treasurer, Decem- 
ber 31, 1937 31,179.75 

84,298.12 

$325,967.04 



—132— 



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—134- 



Treasurer's Report 

For Year Ending December 31, 1937 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1937 : 

Cash Balance January 1, 1937 

Receipts for 1937 : 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Aid to Dependent Children | 434.66 

Federal Grant — Old Age Assist._ . . . 9,704.25 

Educational Measure 1,943.00 

Valuation Measure 2,819.49 

Industrial Schools 7.35 

Old Age Assistance 3,943.09 

Loss of Taxes — Reimbursement . . . 560.84 

Highways 4,500.00 

Highways 492.67 

Highways 3,850.00 

Highways 2,285.52 

Highways 1,482.50 

Tuition— Children 692.22 

Training Schools 173.81 

Income Tax 6,708.92 

Income Tax (Chapt. 362) 299.86 

Corporation Tax 8,445.06 

Gas and Light Co 379.25 

State Aid 240.00 

Veterans' Exemption 36.18 

Mothers' Aid 287.54 

Corporation Tax — Business 198.17 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Dog Licenses (Refund) $ 548.84 

Highways 1,907.29 



$ 49,254.73 



49,484.38 



—135— 



Highways — Main Street 
Board of Health (Vacine) 



Received from Charles A. Durkee, Collector: 

Excise Taxes 1933 

Ex;cise Taxes 1934 

Excise Taxes 1935 

■Town Taxes 1935 

Town Taxes 1936 

Excise Taxes 1936 

Poll Taxes 1938 . . . ., 

To¥m Taxes 1937 

Excise Taxes 1937 

Poll Taxes 1937 



2,191.05 




42.00 






4,689.18 




Collector : 




1 2..00 




7.84 




738.79 




9,801.05 


. 


20,454.73 




1,694.88 




239.79 




66,575.41 




4,945.87 




1,302.75 






105,763.11 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Estate Georgia E. Whitney, Bequest $ 

John McNiff, License 

Rudolph Ciouette, License 

Alfred Casassa, License 

John Maguire, License 

Warren Davis, License 

James Mahoney, License '. 

Concord District Court, Fines .... 

Horace E\ Tuttle, Dog Licenses .... 

Selectmen, Licenses 

Dances 

Basketball _ 

avis, Library Fines ... 

Arthur F. Davis, Magazines Sold . . 

Board of Health, Nurse Services . . 

0. D. Wood, Whist Party 

F. E. Tasker, M. D., Milk License . . 

Charles Wiliett, Tax Title 

Charles Wiliett, Interest 

Lizzie Crocker, Tax Title 

Lizzie Crocker, Interest 

Director of Standards, Licenses . . . 

Boston & Iviaine R. R., Fires 

Alien Christofferson, Tax Title .... 



0. D. Wood 
0. D. 
Arthur E 



100.00 




158 



75 
312 

52 

8 

132 

10 

20 
689 

21 

270 

8 

64 

o 
O 

666 



00 



30 

20 



43 

25 
41 
00 

93 



25 
68 
97 
32 
00 
10 
43 



—136— 

Allen Christofferson, Interest 15.69 

Horace F. Tuttle, Sale of Lots, Wood- 
lawn 211.00 

O. D. Wood, Grange Rent 72.55 

Frank Bulette, Tax Title 531.15 

Frank Bulette, Interest 42.47 

Town of Acton, Machinery Account 791.10 

Pomona Grange, Rent of Hall 6.00 

Michael Sheehan, Tax Title 357.71 

Michael Sheehan, Interest 28.44 

William Robblee, License 100.00 

Charles A. Durkee, Alcohol License 1.00 

O. D. Wood, Sheehan Reunion .... 7.50 

Merchants' National Bank, Loan . . 25,000.00 

Merchants' National Bank, Loan . . 10,000.00 

Town of Westford, Schools 152.10 

Town of Hudson, Old Age Assist. . . 100.00 

Tov/n of Maynard, Old Age Assist. 37.50 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition 2,495.80 

City of Maiden, Old Age Assist, . . . 20.00 

City of Lowell, Old Age Assist 40.00 

Clare Milbery, Sealer of Weights . . • 78.88 

Town of Stow, Old Age Assist 20.00 

Amelia Marsh, Tax Title 348.40 

Amelia Marsh, Interest 35.54 

Anna Farrell, Tax Title 440.64 

Anna Farrell, Interest ........... 24.52 

Reimbursement to Welfare Dept. . . 813.00 

Edison Elec. 111. Co., Hosmer Fund 16.02 

Anton Christianson, Tax Title .... 155.71 

Anton Christianson, Interest 1.29 

Town of Stow, Welfare 24.44 

Fred Green, Sale of Lots, Mt. Hope 80.00 

City of Waltham, Welfare 816.00 

O, D. Wood, Gas (Grange) 2.45 

Arthur Raymond, P. P. Tax Title . . 155.60 

Arthur Raymond, Interest 150.43 

Tov/n of Concord, Land Tax 25.12 

Town of Lexington, Old Age Assist. 240.00 

Fred Green, Rent Lowering Device 54.00 



__137— 

Chief of Police, Revolver Permits . . 5.50 

Anderson Bros., Snow Plow 10.00 

Edwin Peterson, Soldiers' Relief . . 5.50 

City of Medford, Welfare 44.43 

Transfer, Memorial Library 297.77 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 4,721.75 

Transfer, Cemetery Fund 1,148.00 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund 25.00 

63,657.27 

Total Cash Receipts and Cash Balance 1/1/37 |272,848.67 

Payments in 1937 : 
Selectmen's Orders 1234,220.69 

State Taxes 7,448.23 

241,668.92 






Cash Balance December 31, 1937 $ 31,179.75 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 
Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 147, Due 

Aug. 1, 1938 $ 1,500.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 148 Due 

Aug. 1, 1939 1,500.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 149, Due 

Aug. 1, 1940 , 1,500,00 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 151, Due June 25, 

1938 25,000.00 

High School Bonds, Due 1938 to 1945 . 17, 



SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 
Balance January 1, 1937 : 

Principal Fund f 82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 2,315.09 

$ 84,554.04 

Received Interest: 

Franklin Inst. Savings $ 75.00 

North Middlesex Savings 75.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 97.14 

ArHngton Five Cents Savings 150.00 



-IBS- 



Worcester North Savings 89.53 

Springfield Inst. Savings 75.00 

Leominster Savings 75.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 62.50 

Athol Savings 112.50 

Cambridge Savings 85.00 

Hudson Savings 125.00 

Marlboro Savings 105.00 

Town of Acton 150.00 

Waltham Savings 110.00 

East Cambridge Savings 50.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings . 45.00 

Charleston Five Cent Savings 150.00 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings . 125.00 

Lexington Savings 120.00 

Home Savings 64.53 

Wildey Savings 50.00 

Medford Savings 82.50 

Winchenden Savings 150.00 

Andover Savings 93.75 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . . 98.67 

2,414.22 

Balance December 31, 1937 S 88,968.26 

Andover Savings S 4,000.00 

Arlington Savings 4,000.00 

Athol Savings 3,000.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Cambridge Savings 3,500:00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . .'. 5,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 3,000.00 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings . . 5,000.00 

Franklin Savings 3,000.00 

Home Savings 3,000.00 

Hudson Savings 5,000.00 

Leominster Savings 3,000.00 

Lexington Savings 4,000.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 2,500.00 

Marlboro Savings 4,500.00 



—139— 

Medford Savings . . 3, 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . 7.56 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,238.95 

North Middlesex Savings 3,^ 

Springfield Inst. Savings 3,( 

Waltham Savings 4,^ 

Wildey Savings 2,500.00 

Winchendon Savings 5, 

Worcester North Savings 4, 

— — I 82,246.51 

Transfer to Town Account 4,721.75 



CEMETERY FUNDS 

Balance January 1, 1937: 

Principal Fund . | 39,212.21 

Unexpended Balance , 4,506.73 



Received for Perpetual Care : 
Martha W. Emerson, Lot, Woodlawn 
Lyman G. Rouillard, Lot, Woodlawn 
Stephen Townsend, Lot, Mt. Hope . . 100.00 

Daniel Jones, Lot, Woodlawn 300,00 

Frank H. Graves, Lot, Mt. Hope . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Forest Bean, Lot, Woodlawn . . 50.00 



Received Interest: 

Worcester North Savings 50.00 

Athol Savings 26.26 

Worcester Five Cent Savings ...... 37.50 

Hudson Savings 60.00 

Marlboro Savings 47.25 

Home Savings 25.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 45.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 49.50 

East Cambridge Savings 50.00 

Suffolk Savings 67.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 7.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 45.00 



$ 86,968.26 



I 43,718.94 



750.00 



-140— 



Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
West and South Water Bonds .... 
Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) 

North Middlesex Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings ........ 

Maynard Trust Co. . 

Central Savings 

Assabet Inst. Savings 



9.00 

45.00 

90.00 

109.76 

158.75 

105.04 

81.12 

143.46 

21.99 



1,274.63 



45,743.57 



Balance December 31, 1937 : 

Assabet Inst. Savings 

Athol Savings 

Boston Five Cent Savings 

Central Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . 

East Cambridge Savings 

Home Savings 

Hudson Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Maynard Trust Co. . 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

North Middlesex Savings 

Suffolk Savings 

Worcester North Savings 

Worcester Five Cent Savings .... 

Warren Inst. Savings 

West and South Water Bonds . . . 

Assabet Inst. Savings 

Assabet Inst. Savings 



1,488 
1,050 

2,000 
1,000 
1,500 

250 
300 
1,500 
2,000 
1,000 
2,400 
1,900 
3,228 
3,6^^ 



ZJ'O 



3,475 
6,454 
3,000 
2,000 
1,500 
2,200 
2,100 
250 
300 



36 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



00 
00 
96 

25 



00 



00 



00 
00 



Transfer to Town Account 



44,595.57 

1,148.00 



% 45,743.57 



-141— 



Note: West and South Water Bond, redeemed, 
funds deposited in the Marlboro Savings Bank. 
(POO.OO) 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1937 : 

Principal Fund | 25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 1,256.21 



Received Interest : 

North Middlesex Savings 

Athol Savings 

Amherst Savings 

Lawrence Savings 

Worcester North Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

Worcester Five Cent Savings ...... 

Marlboro Savings 

Waltham Savings 

East Cambridge Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . . 

Lowell Inst. Savings 

Andover Savings 

North Middlesex Savings (Income) 
Hudson Savings . 



Balance December 31, 1937: 

Amherst Savings 

Andover Savings 

Athol Savings 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . 

East Cambridge Savings 

Hudson Savings (Income) 

Lawrence Savings 

Lowell Inst. Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

North Middlesex Savings . . 





^ 26,256.21 


$ 50.00 




50.00 




60.00 




50.00 




25.00 




60.00 




50.00 




60.00 




55.00 




50.00 




60.00 




50.00 




50.00 




1.45 




25.51 






696.96 






$ 26,953.17 


1 2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




900.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 





—142— 

North Middlesex Savings (Income) 53.17 

Waltham Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester North Savings . 1,000.00 

$ 25,953.17 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1937 1,000.00 



S 26,953.17 

WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1937 : 

Principal Fund $ 9,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 678.00 

Susan Augusta and Luther Conant 

Fund • 1,000.00 

Hiram Hapgood Fund 200.00 

Luke Tuttle Fund 200.00 

John W. Heald Fund 841.70 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 2,108.93 

Minnie Davis Fund 331.54 

$ 14,369.17 

Received Interest: 

West Shore R. R. Bond | 40.00 

Cambridge Savings (Hosmer) .... 63.72 

Cambridge Savings 10.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 45.00 

Home Savings 25.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 90.00 

Massachusetts Savings 12.50 

City Inst. Savings 12.50 

Maynard Trust Co, (Income) 26.08 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 30.23 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Heald) . . 25.43 

380.46 



Balance December 31, 1937: 

Cambridge Savings ^ 2,172.65 

Cambridge Savings 336.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 3,000.00 



?14,749.63 



-143- 



City Inst. Savings . . . 

Home Savings 

Massachusetts Savings . . . . , 
Middlesex Inst. Savings . . . , 
Middlesex Inst. Savings . . . 

Warren Inst. Savings 

Maynard Trust Co 

Maynard Trust Co. (Income) 
West Shore R. R. Bond .... 



1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

867 

1,000 

2,000 

400 

675 

1,000 



00 
00 
00 
13 

00 

00 
00 
58 
00 



Transfer to Town Account 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1937: 

Principal Fund 

Received Interest: 

Lexington Savings $ 35.00 

North Middlesex Savings 16.67 

Hudson Savings 10.41 

Marlboro Savings 30.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 45.23 



Balance December 31, 1937: 

Hudson Savings . , 

Lexington Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

North Middlesex Savings 

Abasset Inst. Savings (Income) 



1,000.00 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 
137.31 



$ 14,451.86 

297.77 

$ 14,749.63 



$ 10,000.00 



137.31 



I 10,137.31 



$10,137.31 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1937: 
To Balance 

Received Interest: 
Charlestov^n Five Cent Savings .... | 3.14 



S 1,476.00 



—144— 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 8.13 

Massachusetts Savings 25.34 

Warren Inst. Savings , 2.14 

38.75 



$ 1,514.75 

Balance December 31, 1937 : 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... | 107,23 
Charlestov^n Five Cent Savings .... 277.19 

Massachusetts Savings 1,008.31 

Warren Inst. Savings 97.02 

? 1,489.75 

Transfer to Town Account 25.00 



? 1,514.75 

CEMETERY SURPLUS FUND 

Balance January 1, 1937 : 
to Balance S 1,177.17 

Received Interest: 

Assabet Inst. Savings 17.66 

S 1,194.83 

Balance December 31, 1937: 
Assabet Inst. Savings $ 1,194.83 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1937 : 
To Balance I 548.25 

Received Interest: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings . 16.56 

Balance December 31, 1937 : $ 564.81 

Middlesex Inst. Savings S 564.81 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1937 : 

Principal Fund f 955.00 

Unexpended Balance 27.58 

S 982.58 



—145— 

Received to Fund: 

Company Salaries I 230.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (interest) . 30.80 

260.80 



S 1,243.38 

Balance December 31, 1937 : 

Middlesex Inst. Savings $ 1,240.38 

Paid Trustee's Order 3.00 

$ 1,243.38 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Tov^n Treasurer. 



I 

k 

i 



-146- 



Auditor's Report 



January 28, 1938 

I have audited the books of the Tax Collector and have mailed 
notice to delinquents during the past year. I have checked the 
Treasurer's cash on hand and verified the various Trust Funds 
in the custody of the Treasurer. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



Elizabeth White Fund Reoort 



January 7, 1937 

The Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund have signed orders 
to the Treasurer for one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for the 
year ending December 31, 1937. 

These orders have been given after investigating and finding 
each person to be in need and worthy of help from this trust 
fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WARREN H. JONES, 
WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 

Trustees of the Elizabeth 
White Fund. 



-147— 

Report of an Audit of the Accounts of the 

Town of Acton 



For the Period from November 21, 1933 to November 23, 1937 

February 9, 1938. 
To the Board of Selectmen, 
Mr. Ralph W. Piper, Chairman, 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Acton for the period from November 
21, 1933 to November 23, 1937, made in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of 
a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director 
of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 

Director of Accounts. 
TNW:0 

Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts, 

Department of Corporations and Taxation, 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit 
of the books and accounts of the town of Acton for the period 
from November 21, 1933, the date of the previous audit, to No- 
vember 23, 1937, and submit the following report thereon : 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the 
several departments receiving or disbursing money for the town 
or committing bills for collection, were examined, checked, and 
verified by a comparison with the books of the town accountant 
and the treasurer. 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's office were 



—148— 

examined and checked. The receipts as recorded on the ledger 
were checked with the records of the several departments mak- 
ing payments to the treasurer and with the treasurer's books, 
while the recorded payments were checked with the treasury 
warrants issued by the selectmen and with the treasurer's cash 
book. The appropriations and transfers as recorded on the led- 
ger were checked with the town clerk's records of town meetings 
and the authorization of the finance committee. 

In connection with Federal grants received on account of old 
age assistance, attention is called to the provisions of Section 7, 
Chapter 436, Acts of 1936, which requires that the money re- 
ceived shall be kept in separate accounts and expended for the 
purposes specified by the State Department of Public Welfare. 
Payments on approved cases should be charged directly against 
the proper grant accounts, and any balance in these accounts 
at the close of the year should be carried forward. 

In examining the bills, payrolls, and vouchers, it was found 
that in 1937 an automatic lawnmower w^as purchased for $300.00 
and charged to the appropriation for buildings and grounds. It 
is recommended that in the future a specific appropriation be 
obtained for the purchase of special departmental equipment. 

It was noted that a number of 1936 bills were charged to ap- 
propriations voted for 1937. This practice of paying bills of 
prior years from appropriations provided for current years' ex- 
penses should be discontinued, and specific appropriations voted 
for unpaid bills of a prior year. 

It was also noted that several town officials were paid the 
total of their annual salaries in October, 1937. It is recom- 
mended that no payments of salaries be made in excess of the 
amount due on the date of payment. 

The necessary correcting and adjusting entries resulting from 
the audit were made, a trial balance was taken off, and a balance 
sheet, which is appended to this report, was prepared showing 
the financial condition of the town as of November 23, 1937. The 
balance sheet indicates that the town is in good financial con- 
dition. 

It may be seen from the balance sheet that there is $11,053.19 
in the Overlay Reserve Fund. If voted by the town, the appro- 
priation which is annually voted for the reserve fund under 
Section 6, Chapter 40, General Laws, and which is raised in the 



^149-— 

tax levy, could, instead, be provided for by transfer from the 
Overlay Reserve Fund. 

The books and accounts of the tov^n treasurer vv^ere examined 
and checked. The recorded receipts were analyzed and compared 
with the records in the departments collecting money for the 
town and with the other sources from which money was paid 
into the town treasury, while the payments were checked with 
the selectmen's warrants authorizing the disbursement of town 
funds. The cash balance on November 23, 1937, was proved by a 
reconciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished 
by the bank of deposit, by actual count of the cash in the\ office, 
and by verification of a bank deposit in transit. 

The payments of maturing debt and interest were checked 
with the amounts falling due and with the cancelled securities 
on file. 

The savings bank books and securities representing trust 
fund investments in the custody of the town treasurer and the 
trustees were examined and listed. The income was proved and 
the withdrawals were checked with the receipts as entered in 
the treasurer's cash book. 

Bequests received by the town should be reflected in the treas- 
urer's cash transactions and invested only on authority of se- 
lectmen's warrants. Amounts expended from general cash for 
trust fund purposes, as shown on the balance sheet, should be 
withdrawn from trust funds and, in the future, withdrawals 
should be made in advance of disbursements chargeable to trust 
fund income. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were examined 
and checked with the deeds on file. The amounts added to the 
tax title account were compared with the collector's records and 
the redemptions were checked with the receipts as recorded on 
the treasurer's cash book. 

The books and accounts of the collectors for the town and 
the water supply district were examined and checked. The taxes 
and water rates were audited, and all commitments were recon- 
ciled with the warrants for their collection. The payments to the 
town and district treasurers were checked to the treasurers' 
cash books, the recorded abatements were verified, and the out- 
standing accounts were listed and reconciled with the respective 
ledger accounts. 



—ISO- 
Verification of the outstanding accounts was made by sending 
notices to a number of persons whose names appeared on the 
books as owing money to the town, the repHes received thereto 
indicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The town clerk's records of sporting and dog licenses were 
examined, the payments to the State being verified by a com- 
parison with the receipts on file, and the payments to the town 
treasurer being compared with the treasurer's cash book. 

The accounts of the public welfare, school, and cemetery de- 
partments, as well as all other departments collecting money 
for the town or committing bills for collection, were examined, 
checked, and reconciled with the treasurer's and the accountant's 
books. 

The books and accounts of the treasurer, collector, and ac- 
countant have been kept neatly and accurately. 

The surety bonds of the various town officials required to 
file them were examined and found to be in proper form with 
the exception of the bond of the town clerk, which stipulates 
that he shall turn over the dog licenses to the county treasurer 
instead of to the town treasurer. 

In addition to the balance sheet referred to, there are ap- 
pended to this report tables showing a reconciliaton of the 
treasurer's and thd collector's cash, together with summaries of 
the tax, assessment, and departmental accounts, as well as 
tables showing the trust fund transactions. 

For the cooperation extended by the various town officials 
during the progress of the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assis- 
tants and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 
HBD:0 



—151— 

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance November 21, 1933 $50,855.83 

Receipts: 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $57,744.07 

1934 220,984.86 

1935 208,041.30 

1936 ... 212,755.99 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 . ._ 196,103.52 

895,629.74 

$946,485.57 

Payments : 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $76,560.73 

1934 216,586.83 

1935 ..:... 200,207.38 

1936 207,772.38 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 209,740.76 

$910,868.08 

Balance November 23, 1937: 

First National Bank of Ayer $18,883.56 

Cash In office, verified 10,605.79 

Cash in transit, credited by bank, Novem- 
ber 26, 1937 6,128.14 

35,617.49 

$946,485.57 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF AYE.R 

Balance November 23, 1937, per statement $22,433.38 

Balance November 23, 1937, per check 

book $18,883.56 

Outstanding checks November 23, 1937, 

per list 3,549.82 

ll $22,433.38 

RECONCILIATION OF TAX COLLECTOR'S CASH 

1. Balances November 23, 1937, per tables and cash books: 
Taxes: 

Levy of 1935 $.50 

Levy of 1936 832.27 

Levy of 1937 876.91 

$1,709.68 

Motor vehicle excise taxes: 

Levy of 1935 17.09 

Levy of 1936 30.25 

Levy of 1937 105.64 

152.98 

I Interest and Costs : , 

Taxes : 

Levy of 1936 $49.20 

Levy of 1937 12.02 

61.22 



—152— 

Motor vehicle excise taxes: 

Levy of 1935 $1.88 

Levy of 1936 2.32 

Levy of 1937 .67 

Cash overage November 23, 1937 

Balance November 23, 1937: 

Concord National Bank . 

Cash in office, verified 

CONCORD NATIONAL BANK 

Balance November 23, 1937, per statement 

Balance November 23, 1937 per check book 

Outstanding checks November 23, 1937, 

per list 

TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 

Adjustment of outstanding list, per previ- 
ous audit 
Overpayment tO' treasurer, adjusted 

Payments to treasurer: 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $165.75 

1934 15.22 

1935 1.00 

Abatements : 

1933 8.00 

1934 6.94 

Tax titles taken November 21, 1933 to De- 
cember 31, 1936 

TAXES— 1932 

Outstanding November 21, 1933/ 

Tax titles disclaimed 1936 

Payments to treasurer: 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $1,700.49 

1934 12,769.71 

1935 13.63 

1936 18.48 



4.87 
39.52 



$1,568.95 
399.32 



$1,568.95 
7,503.67 

$107.41 

1.00 
150.00 



$181.97 



14.94 
61.50 



$17,133.61 
182.00 



$1,968.27 



$1,968.27 



$9,072.62 



$9,072.62 



$258.41 



$258.41 



$17,315.61 



$14,502.31 



—153— 

Abatements : 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $97.28 

1934 1,004.66 

Tax titles taken November 21, 1933 to De- 
cember 31, 1936 

Added to tax titles November 21, 1933 to 
December 31, 1936 

TAXES— 1933 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 

Additional commitment 

Payments and refunds by State, (Old Age 

Assistance taxes) 

Tax titles disclaimed 1936 

Payments to treasurer: 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $4,310.44 

1934 22,676.48 

1935 8,872.20 

1936 . . 18.88 

Abatements : 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $2.00 

1934 166.97 

1935 • 706.90 

1936 7.08 



Payments to treasurer: 

1934 $60,979.94 

1935 23,424,07 

1936 10,048.70 



1,101.94 




1,491.84 




219.52 






$17,315.61 




$40,502.75 




9.00 




42.00 




182.31 






$40,736.06 



$35,878.00 



882.95 



Refunds by State 1934 (Old Age Assistance 

taxes) 133.00 

Tax titles taken November 21, 1933 to 

December 31, 1938 611.86 

Added to tax titles November 21, 1933 to 

December 31, 1936 3,230.25 



TAXES— 1934 

Commitment per warrant $98,775.22 

Additional commitment . 2.00 

• $98,777.22 

Abatements after payment, refunded .... 115.20 

Tax titles disclaimed 1936 181.76 



$40,736.06 



$99,074.18 



$94,452.71 



—154— 

Abatements : 

1934 S190.96 

1935 285.16 

1936 709.75 



1.186.87 



Tax titles taken January 1, 1934 to De- 
cember 31. 1936 1.215.08 

Added to tax titles January 1. 1934 tc De- 
cember 31. 1936 2.219.52 



S99.074.18 



TAXES— 1935 

Commitment per warrant ... S102.868.06 

Abatements after warrant, refunded 5.36 

Tax titles disclaimed 1936 183.58 



S103.C57.00 



Payments :o treasurer: 

1935 S69.743.47 

1936 20.824.81 



S90.5S3-28 



Abatements: 

1935 S156J>4 

1936 288 20 



444.44 



Added to tax titles January 1. 1935 to De- 
cember 31. 1936 2.412.00 

Outstanding DecemJ3er 31. 1936 9.632.28 

S103.057.00 

Outstanding January 1. 1937 39.532.28 

Payments to treasursr January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 S9.038.94 

Abatements January 1 to November 23. 

1937 - 426.58 

Tax titles taken January 1 to November 

23. 1937 166.26 

Cash balance November 23. 1937 .50 



S9.532.28 



TAXES— 1936 
Commitment per warrant S108. 861.44 

Additional com m itment 52.73 



S108.914.17 

Abatements after rravmen:. refunded 24.23 



S108.938.40 



Payments to treasurer 869.537.20 

Abatements 5.563.87 

Added to tax titles 1.893.11 

Outstanding December 31. 1936 31.944.22 



S108.938.40 



—155— 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $31,944.22 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $16,150.43 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 

1937 70.00 

Added to tax titles January 1 to November 

23, 1937 200.92 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . . 14,690.60 

Cash balance November 23, 1937 832.27 

• $31,944.22 

TAXES— 1937 

Commitment January 1 to November 23, 

1937 per warrant $103,899.17 

Abatements after payment, refunded Jan- 
uary 1 to November 23, 1937 4.85 

Commitment list in excess of warrant .... 2.00 

$103,906.02 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $64,545.85 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 1937: 

Reported $340.30 

To be reported 2.00 

342.30 

Added to tax titles January 1 to November 

23, 1937 1,079.44 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . . 37,061.52 

Cash balance November 23, 1937 876.91 

$103,906.02 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 $299.14 

Payments to treasurer: 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $75.80 

1934 105.03 

180.83 

Abatements November 21 to December 31, 

1933 118.31 

$299.14 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 $2,385.48 

Abatements after payments, refunded, No- 
vember 21 to December 31, 1933 7.18 

$2,392.66 



— 156 — 

Payments to treasurer: 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $331.38 

1934 915.24 

1935 183.12 

1936 29.31 

1,459.05 

Abatements: 

1934 $658.53 

1935 78.14 

1936 4.19 

740.86 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 192.75 

$2,392.66 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $192.75 

Court judgments January 1 to November 

23, 1937 $192.75 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1933 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 $3,071.32 

Commitment November 21 to December 31, 

1933 per warrants 832.49 

Abatements after payment, refunded, No- 
vember 21 to December 31, 1933 28.27 

$3,932.08 

Payments to treasurer: 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $412.43 

1934 1,817.08 

1935 1,064.15 

1936 32.19 

3,325.85 

Abatements : 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 $103.70 

1934 38.70 

1935 376.71 

519.11 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 87.12 

$3,932.08 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $87.12 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 2.00 

Couit Judgments January 1 to November 

23, 1937 : 85.12 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1934 

Commitment per warrants $6,278.09 

Commitment list in excess of warrants . . 5.00 

Abatements after payments, refunded .... 99.64 



$87.12 



$6,382.73 



—157— 

Payments to treasurer: 

1934 $3,426.88 

1935 . 1,735.50 

1936 721.85 

$5,884.23 

Abatements: 

1934 $111.33 

1935 49.86 

1936 107.83 

269.02 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 229.48 

$6,382.73 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $229.48 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 6.66 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 

1937 6.00 

Court judgments January 1 to November 

23, 1937 216.82 

$229.48 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1935 

Commitments per warrants: 

1935 $6,286.31 

1936 . 3.64 

$6,289.95 

Abatements after payment, refunded 1935 219.22 

$6,509.17 

Payments to treasurer: 

1935 $3,797.24 

1936 1,643.54 

■ $5,440.78 

Abatements: 

1935 $279.55 

1936 47.19 

326.74 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 741.65 

$6,509.17 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $741.65 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $644.71 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 1937: 

Reported $56.31 

To be reported 13.01 

69.32 

Court judgments January 1 to November 

23, 1937 7.93 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . . 2.60 

Cash balance November 23, 1937 . 17.09 

$741.65 



—158— 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1936 

Commitment per warrants $6,878.63 

Abatements after payment, refunded .... 208.44 

Payments to treasurer $4,161.16 

Abatements 391.67 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 2,534.24 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $2,534.24 

Abatements after payment, refunded, 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 16.07 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $1,546.71 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 

1937 19.01 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . . 954.34 

Cash balance November 23, 1937 30.25 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1937 

Commitment January 1 to November 23, 

1937, per warrants $7,355.67 

Abatements after payments: 
Refunded January 1 to November 23, 1937 $149.66 

To be refunded 61.72 

211.38 

Commitment list in excess of warrant . . . '.02 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $4,572.22 

Abatements January 1 to November 23, 1937: 

Reported $315.02 

To be reported 99.69 

414.71 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . . 2,474.50 

Cash balance November 23, 1937 105.64 



TAX TITLES 

Balance November 21, 1933 $3,636.66 

Tax titles taken Novem.ber 21, 1933 to 
December 31, 1936: 

Taxes 1931 $61.50 

Taxes 1932 1,491.84 

Taxes 1933 611.86 

Taxes 1934 1,215.08 

3,380.28 



$7,087.07 



$7,087.07 



$2,550.31 



$2,550.31 



$7,567.07 



$7,567.07 






—159- 

Added to tax titles November 21, 1933 to 
December 31, 1936: 

Taxes 1932 

Taxes 1933 

Taxes 1934 

Taxes 1935 . . 

Taxes 1936 



Interest, costs, and recording fees, No- 
vember 21, 1933 to December 31, 1936 . . 



Tax titles redeemed; 



1934 
1935 



$219.52 
3,230.25 
2,219.52 
2,412.00 
1,893.11 



$3,475.32 
4,944.90 
1,941.97 



9,974.40 



1,150.36 



$18,141.70 



$10,362.19 



Tax titles disclaimed 1936: 

Taxes 1932 

Taxes 1933 

Taxes 1934 

Taxes 1935 

Interest and costs 



Balance December 31, 1936 



Balance January 1, 1937 



$182.00 
182.31 
181.76 
183.58 

44.70 



774.35 
7,005.16 

$7,005.16 



$18,141.70 



Tax titles taken January 1 to November 
23, 1937: 
Taxes 1935 



166.26 



Added to tax titles January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937: 

Taxes 1936 

Taxes 1937 

Interest, costs, and recording fees, Janu- 
ary 1 to November 23, 1937 



i'ax titles redeemed January 1 to Novem- 
ber 23, 1937 

Jalance November 23, 1937, per list 



$200.92 

1,079.44 



1,280.36 



46.61 



$3,615.86 
4,882.53 



$8,498.39 



$8,498.39 



—1 GO- 
TOWN CLERK 
DOG LICENSES 

Licenses issued 1936: 

Males 208 @ $2.00 $416.00 

Spayed females 32 @ 2.00 64.00 

Females 54 @ 5.00 270.00 

Kennel 1 (a) 50.00 50.00 



Payments to treasurer $730.80 

Pees retained 291 @ $.20 58.20 

Cash balance December 31, 1936 11.00 



Cash balance January 1, 1937 $11.00 

Licenses issued January 
1 to December 6, 1937: 

Males 199 @ $2.00 $398.00 

Spayed females 40 @ 2.00 80.00 

E'emales 60 @ 5.00 300.00 

Kennel 1 @ 25.00 25.00 

Kennel 1 @ 50.00 50.00 

853.00 



Payments to treasurer: " 
January 1 to November 23, 

1937 $790.40 

November 24 to Decem.ber 

6, 1937 10.80 

$801.20 

Fees retained January 1 to 

December 6, 1937 60.80 

Cash balance December 6, 

1937 2.00 



Licenses issued 1936: 
Resident citizens' fishing 
Resident citizens' hunting 
Resident citizens' sporting 
Resident citizens' minor 
and female fishing . . . 
Resident citizens' minor 

trapping 

Resident citizens' trapping 
Non-resident citizens' fish- 
ing 

Duplicates 



TOWN CLERK 
SPORTING LICENSES 

62 @ $2.00 


$124.00 


43 @ 


2.00 


86.00 


33 @ 


3.25 


107.25 


14 (it) 


1.25 


17.50 


6 @ 


2.25 


13.50 


5 Cw 


5.25 


26.25 


1 @ 


5.25 


5.25 


1 (a) 


.50 


.50 









$800.00 



$800.00 



$864.00 



$864.00 



$380.25. 



—161— 

Payments to Division of Fisheries and 

Game 1936 $339.25 

Pees retained 1936 41.00 



Licenses issued January 
1 to December 6, 1937: 

Resident citizens' fishing- 78 @ $2.00 $156.00 

Resident citizens' hunting 51 @ 2.00 102.00 

Resident citizens' sporting 35 (it' 2.00 113.75- 

Resident citizens' minor 

and female fishing ... 20 @ 1.25 25.00 

Resident citizens' minor 

trapping 5 @ 2.25 . 11.25 

Resident citizens' trapping 13 @ 5.25 68.25 

Non-resident citizens' fish- 
ing 1 @ 5.25 5.25 

Special non-resident fish- 
ing 2 @ 1.50 3.00 

Duplicates 4 @ .50 2.00 



Payments to Division of Fisheries and 
Game : 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 $391.00 

November 24 to December 6, 1937 40.75 

$431.75 

Fees retained January 1 to December 6, 

1937 50.75 

Cash balance December 6, 1937 4.00 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 $706.05 

Charges : 

1934 $2,927.22 

1935 . 2,499.21 

1936 1,128.58 

6,555.01 



Payments to treasurer: 

1934 $2,571.45 

1935 598.65 

1936 1,948.27 



$380.25 



$488.50 



$488.50 



$7,261.06 



$5,118.37 



—162- 

Disallowances : 

November 21, to December 31, 1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list . 



$97.44 

615.38 

201.00 

9.00 



922.82 
1,219.87 



$900.44 
319.43 



$7,261.06 
$1,219 87 



$1,219.87 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Accounts Receivable 
Charges : 

1935 $432.00 

1936 . 502.00 

Payments to treasurer 1936 $144.00 

Disallowances 1936 609.33 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 180.67 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 $180.67 

Charges January 1 to November 23, 1937 268.87 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list 

BUREAU OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding November 21, 1933 $1,019.02 

Charges : 

1934 $1,236.33 

1935 1,867.37 

1936 2,412.65 

5,516.35 

Payments to treasurer: 
November 21 to December 31, 1933 $1,019.02 

1934 1,209.66 

1935 1,779.51 

1936 2,157.02 

$6,165.21 



$934.00 



$934.00 



$449.54 
$449.54 



$6,535.37 



_.__163— 

Disallowances : 

1934 226.67 

1935 55.86 

1936 47.63 

130.16 

Outstanding December 31, 1936 240.00 

$6,535.37 

Outstanding January 1, 1937 240.00 

Charges January 1 to November 23, 1937 4,439.32 

'■ $4,679.32 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to No- 
vember 23, 1937 $3,462.77 

Disallowances January 1 to November 23, 
1937 23.50 

Outstanding November 23, 1937, per list 1,193.05 

$4,679.32 

ELIZABETH WHITE CHARITY FUND 

Savings 

Cash Deposits Total 

On hand November 21, 1933 $26,894.60 $26,894.60 

On hand at end of year 1933 $26,529.60 $26,529.60 

On hand at end of year 1934 $26,374.43 $26,374.43 

On hand at end of year 1935 $26,324.86 $26,324.86 

On hand at end of year 1936 $26,256.21 $26,256.21 

On hand November 23, 1937 . . $25.00 $26,227.66 $26,252.66 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $35.00 

deposits $400.00 Relief 400.00 

Income 35.00 



$435.00 $435.00 

1934 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $866.13 

deposits $1,021.30 Relief 1,021.30 

Income 866.13 

$1,887.43 $1,887.43 

1935 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $762.43 

deposits $812.00 Relief 812.00 

Income 762.43 

$1,574.43 $1,574.43 



—164— 

1936 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $851.35 

deposits $920.00 Relief 895.00 

Income 826.35 



$1,746.35 $1,746.35 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $621.45 

deposits $650.00 Relief 650.00 

Income 646.45 Cash on hand November 

23, 1937 25.00 



$1,296.45 $1,296.45 

GEORGIA E. WHITNEY CHARITY FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1937 

On hand November 23, 1937 $10,092.08 $10,092.08 

Receipts Payments 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 

Income $92.08 Deposited in savings banks $10,092.08 

Bequest 10,000.00 



$10,092.08 $10,092.08 

WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Savings Securities 
Deposits Par Value Total 

On hand November 21, 1933 $13,138.86 $1,000.00 $14,138.86 

On hand at end of year 1933 $12,793.18 $1,000.00 $13,793.18 

On hand a.t end of year 1934 $12,938.70 $1,000.00 $13,938.70 

On hand at end of year 1935 $12,957.14 $1,000.00 $13,957.14 

On hand at end of year 1936 $13,369.17 $1,000.00 $14,369.17 

On hand November 23, 1937 $13,661.87 $1,000.00 $14,661.87 

Receipts PayTnents 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Withdrawn from savings Transfen^ed to town $345.68 

deposits $345.68 

1934 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $438.69 

deposits $293.17 Transferred to town 293.17 

Income 438.69 

$731.86 $731.86 



-165- 



1935 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits 

Income 



$353.24 
371.68 



Added to savings deposits 
Transferred to town 



$724.92 

1936 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 

deposits $261.47 Transferred to town 

Income 673.50 

$934.97 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 
Income $292.70 Added to savings deposits 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



$371.68 
353.24 



$724.92 

$673.50 
261.47 

$934.97 

$292.70 



Savings 

Cash Deposits Total 

On hand November 21, 1933 $235.00 $235.00 

On hand at end of year 1933 $237.06 $237.06 

On hand at end of year 1934 $10.00 $493.60 $503.60 

On hand at end of year 1935 $745.92 $745.92 

On hand at end of year 1936 $982.58 $982.58 

On hand November 23, 1937 $1,224.31 $1,224.31 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Income $2.06 Added to savings deposits $2.08 

1934 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $258.54 

deposits $2.00 Relief 2.00 

Income 8.54 Cash on hand December 

Bequests 260.00 31, 1934 10.00 



$270.54 



$270.54 



1935 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits 

Income 

Bequests 

Cash on hand January 1, 
1935 





Added to savings deposits 


$256.32 


$4.00 


Relief 


4.00 


16.32 






230.00 






» 

10.00 







$260.32 



$260.32 



— 166-- 

1936 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $254.66 

deposits $18.00 Relief 18.00 

Income 24.66 

Bequests 230.00 



$272.66 $272.66 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $244.73 

deposits $3.00 Relief 3.00 

Income 14.73 

Bequests 230.00 



$247.73 $247.73 



WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



Savings 

Deposits Total 



On hand November 21, 1933 
On hand at end of year 1933 
On hand at end of year 1934 
On hand at end of year 1935 
On hand at end of year 1936 
On hand November 23, 1937 



$500.27 


$500.27 


$501.43 


$501.43 


$516.57 


$516.57 


$532.17 


$532.17 


$548.25 


$548.25 


$548.25 


$548.25 


Payments 





Receipts 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Income $17.66 Added to savings deposits $1.16 

Relief 16.50 



$17.66 $17.66 

1934 
Income $15.14 Added to savings deposits $15.14 

1935 
Income $15.60 Added to savings deposits $15.60 

1936 
Income $16.08 Added to savings deposits $16.08 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 
No transactions recorded 



—167- 



APRIL 19th CELEBRATION FUND 

Savings 
Deposits 

On hand November 21, 1933 $238.18 

On hand at end of year 1933 $246.57 

On hand at end of year 1934 $254.01 

On hand at end of year 1935 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Income $8.39 Added to savings deposits 

1934 

Income $7.44 Added to savings deposits 

1935 

Withdrav/n from savings Added to savings deposits 

deposits $261.68 Transferred to town .... 

Income 7.67 



Total 



$238.18 

$246.57 
$254.01 



$8.39 

$7.44 



$7.67 
281.68 



$269.35 
CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Savings Securities 
Cash Deposits Par Value 

On hand November 21, 1933 . . . $37,642.72 $3,300.00 

On hand at end of year 1933 . . $36,581.61 $3,300.00 

On hand at end of year 1934 . . $38,863.00 $3,000.00 

On hand at end of year 1935 . $40,207.42 $2,700.00 

On hand at end of year 1936 . . 41,318.94 $2,400.00 

On hand November 23, 1937 ... $500.00 $42,559.92 $2,100.00 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 

deposit,s $1,301.35 Transferred to town .... 

Income 140.24 

Bequests 100.00 

$1,541.59 

1934 

Securities matured ...... $300.00 Added to savings deposits 

Withdrawn from savings Transferred to town 

deposits . . ." 613.15 

Income 1,119.54 

Bequests 1,475.00 



$269.35 



Total 



$40,942.72 
$39,881.61 
$41,863.00 
$42,907.42 
$43,718.94 
$45,159.92 



$240.24 
1,301.35 



$1,541.59 



$2,894.54 
613.15 



$3,507.69 



$3,507.69 



-168— 



1935 

Securities matured $300.00 Added to savings deposits $2,497.92 

Withdrawn from savings Transferred to town 1,153.50 

deposits . . 1,153.50 

Income 1,492.92 

Bequests 705.00 

$3,651.42 $3,651.42 

1936 

Securities matured $300.00 Added to savings deposits $2,244.02 

Withdrawn from savings Transferred to town 1,132.50 

deposits 1,132.50 

Income 1,319.02 

Bequests 625.00 

$3,376.52 $3,376.52 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 

Securities matured $300.00 Added to savings deposits $1,240.98 

Income ' 740.98 Cash on hand November 

Bequests 700.00 ber 23, 1937 500.00 



$1,740.98 
CEMETERY SURPLUS FUND 



$1,740.98 



Savings 
Deposits 



Total 



On hand November 21, 1933 
On hand at end of year 1933 
On hand at end of year 1934 
On hand at end of year 1935 
On hand at end of year 1938 
On hand November 23, 1937 



$1,320.65 
$1,212.69 
$1,130.92 
$1,142.65 
$1,177.17 
$1,177.17 



$1,320.65 
$1,212.69 
$1,130.92 
$1,142.65 
$1,177.17 
$1,177.17 



Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 
Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 

deposits $129.04 Transferi'ed to town 

Income 21.08 



$150.12 



1934 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits $102.98 

Income 21.21 



Added to savings deposits 
Transferred to town .... 



$21.08 
129.04 



$150.12 

$21.21 
102.98 



$124.19 



$124.19 



-169- 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits 

Income 

Income 



1935 

Added to savings deposits 

$41.50 Transferred to town 

53.23 



$94.73 



$34.52 



1936 



Added to savings deposits 



$53.23 
41.50 



$94.73 
$34.52 



January 1 to November 23, 1937 
No transactions recorded 



LUKE BLANC HARD CEMETERY FUND 



Savings 
Deposits 



Total 



On hand November 21, 1933 . . 
On hand at end of year 1933 
On hand at end of year 1934 
On hand at end of year 1935 
On hand at end of year 1936 
On hand November 23, 1937 



$1,406.72 
$1,429.58 
$1,435.50 
$1,467.30 
$1,476.00 
$1,476.00 



$1,406.72 
$1,429.58 
$1,435.50 
$1,467.30 
$1,476.00 
$1,476.00 



Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits $25.00 

Income 47.86 



$72.83 



Added to savings deposits $47.86 
Transferred to town 25.00 



$72.86 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits 

Income 



1934 



$25.00 
30.92 



$55.92 



Added to savings deposits $30.92 
Transferred to town 25.00 



$55.92 



1935 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits $25.00 

Income 56.80 



Added to savings deposits $56.80 
Transferred to town .... 25.00 



$81.80 



$81.80 



—170— 



1936 



Withdrawn from savings 

deposits 

Income 



$30.00 
38.70 



Added to savings deposits $38.70 
Transferred to town .... 30.00 



$68.70 $68.70 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 
No transactions recorded 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 

Savings Securities 
Cash Deposits Par Value Total 

On hand November 21, 1933 . . $54,153.30 $20,000.00 $84,153.30 

On hand at end of year 1933 . . $32,273.68 $20,000.00 $82,273.68 

On hand at end of year 1934 . . $84,055.29 $20,000.00 $84,055.29 

On hand at end of year 1935 . . $74,836.03 $10,030.00 $84,836.03 

On hand at end of year 1936 . . $74,554.04 $10,030.00 $84,554.04 

On hand November 23, 1937 . $38.75 $86,704.80 $86,773.55 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits $75.07 

deposits $1,954.69 Transferred to town ... 1,954.69 

Income 75.07 

$2,029.76 $2,029.73 

1934 

Securities matured $20,000.00 Securities purchased $20,000.00 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 2,929.31 

deposits 1,147.70 Transferred to town 1,147.70 

Income 2,929.31 

$24,077.01 $24,077.01 
1935 

Securities matured $20,000.00 Securities purchased ... $10,000.00 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 12,572.08 

deposits 1,791.31 Transferred to town 1,791.31 

Income 2,572.08 

$24,363.39 $24,363.39 
1936 

Securities matured $10,000.00 Securities purchased .... $10,000.00 

Withdrawn from savings Added to savings deposits 2,391.73 

deposits 2,673.75 Transferred to town 2,673.75 

Income 2,391.73 



$15,065.48 



$15,065.48 



—171— 



January 1 to November 23, 1937 

Securities matured $10,000.00 Added to savings deposits $12,150.76 

Income 2,219.51 Cash on hand November 

23, 1937 68.75 



$12,219.51 $12,219.51 

CHARLOTTE L. GOODNOW FUND 
In Custody of Trustees 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand November 21, 1933 $3,448.53 $3,448.53 

On hand at end of year 1933 $3,453.30 $3,453.30 

On hand at end of year 1934 $3,458.33 $3,458.33 

On hand at end of year 1935 ............ $3,458.70 $3,458.70 

On hand at end of year 1936 $3,465.38 $3,465.38 

On hand November 23, 1937 $3,465.38 $3,465.38 

Receipts Payments 

November 21 to December 31, 1933 

Income $43.77 Added to savings deposits $4.77 

Evangelical Church .... 30.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery .... 9.00 



Income 



Income 



$43.77 



1934 



$108.93 



$108.93 



$100.37 



Added to savings deposits 

Evangelical Church 

Woodlawn Cemetery .... 



1935 



Added to savings deposits 

Evangelical Church 

Woodlawn Cemetery 



$43.77 

$5.03 
88.90 
15.00 



$108.93 

$.37 
80.00 
20.00 



Income 



Income 



$100.37 $100.37 

1936 

.... $91.68 Added to savings deposits $6.68 

Evangelical Church 75.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery ..... 10.00 

$91.68 $91.68 

January 1 to November 23, 1937 

$55.00 Evangelical Church $55.00 



—172— 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 









OF THE 



TOWN 




MASSACHUSETTS 




rA€f|r'0)N 




For the Year Ending December 31 



193 



—176— 
Organization 



School Committee 

Dr. Randall Woodworth, Chairman Term expires 1939 

Mrs. Lulu Clark Term expires 1938 

Mrs. Leland Howe Term expires 1939 

Mr. Everett Montague Term expires 1940 

Mrs. Oliver Wood Term expires 1940 

Mr. Samuel Knowlton Term expires 1938 

Meetings of the School Committee 
Regular meetings of the School Committee shall be held the 
second and fourth Tuesdays of each month in the High School, 
at 7:30 P.M. Exceptions may be made during Juty and August. 

Superintendent 

Waiter F. Hall 
South Acton, Mass. Office — High School Building. Tel. 110 

School Physician Dr. Ernest A. Mayell, Acton 

School Nurse Mrs. Genevieve Creeley, West Acton 

Attendance Officer George A. Richardson, Acton 

School Calendar 
January 3, 1938 — AH schools reopened. 
February 18, 1938— All schools close. 
February 28, 1938 — All schools reopen. 
April 15, 1938 — All schools close. 
April 25, 1938 — All schools reopen. 
June 10, 1938 — Grades I to VI, inclusive, close. 
June 22, 1938 — Graduation. 
June 24, 1938 — High School closes. 
September 7, 1938 — High School reopens. 
September 12, 1938 — Grades I to VI, inclusive, reopen. 
November 23, 1938 — All schools close at noon. 
November 28, 1938 — All schools reopen. 
December 22, 1938 — All schools close. 
January 3, 1939 — All schools reopen. 

Legal Holidays 

January 1, February 22. April 19, May 30, July 4, first Mon- 
day of September, October 12, November 11, Thanksgiving Day, 
Christmas Day (the day following, when any of those men- 



—177— 

tioned occur on Sunday) . Arbor Day falls on the last Saturday 
in April and is not a legal holiday. Flag Day falls on June 14, 
and is not a le;gal holiday ; it should be observed by prosper ex- 
ercises by any school in session on that day. 

No. Sclioo! Signal— Time 7:15 A.M. 
Acton Center and South Acton 2-2-2-2 blasts 

West Acton 1-1 blasts 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until they 
are 5 years 8 months of age on or before September 1^ except 
in the case of those children 5 years 6 months of age on Sep- 
tember 1 whose mental age and physical condition are satisfac- 
tory. Ordinarily,, entrance must come during the first two 
weeks of school. Ail children entering for the first: time must 
present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessioiis 

The total length of sessions shall be 5^/4 hours in the elemen- 
tary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with sufficient re- 
cesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to pupils ex- 
cept hy the principals or persons delegated by the principals. 

3. School Blisses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools they 
attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils must meet 
the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct themselves 
properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They must 
present a written excuse signed by parent or guardian for each 
absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a long- 
er period in the high school. 



—178— 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws : Chapter 71, Section 55 ; Chapter 76, Section 15 

''A child from a household where a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious 
or contagious disease, or from a household exposed to contagion 
from any such disease in another household, shall not attend 
any public school during such illness or exposure until the teach- 
er of the school has been furnished with a certificate from the 
local board of health, school physician or from the attending 
physician, stating that danger of conveying such disease by 
such child has passed. 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them by 
the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any form of 
school property. 

8. Fire Drill 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the el- 
ementary schools and at least once a month in the high school. 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 

As of January 1, 1938 

Center School App. Graduate of 
Raymond Nickerson, 

Prin 1936 Bridgawater State College 

Ruth Berglind 1935 Lesley Normal School 

Qertrude Puhakka 1931 ¥icchbuYg Noimal 

South School 

Julia McCarthy, Prin. . 1906 Fitchburg Normal 

Helen Appleby 1936 Lesley Normal School 

Jessie Kinnevan 1929 Worcester Normal 

Florence Merriam 1927 Fitchburg Normal 

West School 

Charles Whitcomb, Prin. 1936 Bricgewater Stats Cailsge 

Grace Callanan 1935 Fitchburg State College 

Elise Dickerman 1926 Fitchburg Normal 



Home Addre&i 

Orleans 
South Acton 
Fitchburg 



South Acton 
Concord 
Worcester 
South Acton 



Merrimacport 
West Acton 
Ayer 



—179— 



High School 

Walter F. Hall, Prin. . . 1935 
Richard Greenman, As- 
sistant Prin 1935 

Katlii-yn Billman 1937 

Margaret Boornazian . . 1929 

George Braman 1933 

Robert Bolan 1930 

Walter Holt . 1928 

Henry Hopkinson 1930 

Marjorie Jones 1931 

Christine Leavitt 1937 

Mary Stolte ._ . 1931 

Marion Towne 1921 



Harvard University 



South Acton 



Harvard University Concord 

University of New HampshireWollaston 



Burdett College 
Wentworth Institute 
Clark University 
Dartmouth College 
Northeastern Law 
Simmons College 
Framingham State College 
Middlebury College 
Smith College 



Methuen 
Acton 
Marlboro 
East Acton 
West Acton 
South Acton 
Framingham 
South Acton 
Concord 



Supervisors 

Frank Braman, Drawing 
Eleanor Jones, Phys, Ed. 
Richard Law, Music 



New School of Design Acton 

B. U. Sargent School South Acton 

Certificates from Harvard, St. West Newton 

Peter's College, and Boston 

University 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the voters of Acton : 

The school committee herewith presents its report for the 
year 1937, together with the report of the superintendent of 
schools which has been accepted by the committee, and is recom- 
mended for your careful study. You may, thereby, know how 
your school dollar is spent and just what is being done. 

The committee as a whole was quite disappointed in not be- 
ing able to convince enough citizens to build a new consolidated 
school. However, we do not feel now that we should try to 
modernize the existing structures, as it would require an im- 
mense expenditure of money, with no real results. 

The committee does feel, however, that the auditorium in the 
high school should be thoroughly gone over and put back into 
first-class condition. This is a major job. But, in addition, ex- 
tensive elementary school repairs are needed, so that, altogether, 
we feel it necessary to ask for a separate appropriation. 

The grounds about the high school have been greatly im- 
proved by the help of the Garden Club, a public spirited citizen, 
and some funds from our own budget. We hope we can do more 
in the future to make appearances even better. 



—ISO- 
Two teachers of long service in the schools of Acton decided 
to leave us this past year, whose departure caused us keen 
regret, inasmuch as they were both leaders in their fields. How- 
ever, they have been replaced, and it is hoped the new ones will 
build around us as much confidence as they inspired. 

Mrs. Charles Clark has decided to withdraw from further 
committee service at the end of her term in March. This will 
be a great loss to the town, for her experience as a committee 
member and her keen viev/s on the many problems that con- 
front the committee have been^ of inestimable value. Her loss 
will be felt by the remaining members. We surely extend our 
appreciation to her for her tireless efforts. 

Out of 109 tov^ns of 5,000 population or less maintaining high 
schools in the State of Massachusetts Acton ranks 27th in per 
capita cost per pupil. Considering the fact that larger towns 
than ours, or smaller ones, with a much larger private school 
enrollment, may outrank us, we feel that Acton fares not too 
badly. 

The committee has very carefully prepared its budget for 
1938 and believes that $47,000 will carry us through, provid- 
ing the town sees fit to appropriate a sufficient separate amount 
to take care of the extensive and necessary repairs on all 
buildings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RANDALL N. WOODWORTH. Chairman 



COMPARISON OF COSTS FOR OPERATING 
ACTON SCHOOLS 

Mass. SchoQi Fund 1937 1936 1935 1934 

Part I $3,990.00 $3,886.00 $4,031.00 $4,012.00 

State Wards 866.03 531.72 525.58 697.60 

$4,856.03 $4,417.72 $4,556.58 $4,709.60 
Out-of-Town Tuition *2,436.15 2a88.66 2,615.37 2,549.86 

Total $7,292.18 $6,606.38 $7,171.95 $7,259.46 

Expended from Appropriation 45,994.58 45,998.26 43,498.72 41,499.77 

Net Cost to Town $38,702.40 $39,391.83 $36,326=77 $34 240.31 

Appropriation 46,000.00 46,000.00 43,500.00 4l',500.00 

Special Appropriation 1,425.22 837.22 

*ApprO'Ximate amount. Any discrepancy between this amount and that in 
the treasurer's report is due to the fact that only' money received for tuition 
for the year 1937 is included here. 



—181— 
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES FOR 1938 



I. General Control 

1. School Committee: 
Salaries : 

2. Superintendent of Schools and 

Enforcement of Law: 





Salary of Superintendent 

Salary of Clerk 


$2,000.00 
150.00 




Salary of Attendance Officer . . 
Office Expenses 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors' Salaries, Music, Art, 
Physical Education 

Principals' Salaries : 

High $1,000.00 

Elementary .... 3,600.00 


40.00 
160.00 


IL 

3. 

4. 


$1,600.00 



4,600,00 



5. Teachers' Salaries: 

High $15,600.00 

Elementary 8,000.00 23,600.00 

6. Textbooks: 

High $400.00 

Elementary 300.00 



700.00 



III. Expenses of Operation 

8. Wages of Janitors: 

High $1,350.00 

Elementary 2,084.00 



9. Fuel: 

High $800.00 

Elementary 1,100.00 



3,434.00 



$2,350.00 



7. Stationery and Supplies: 

High $800.00 

Elementary 400.00 1,200.00 31,700.00 



1,900.00 



—182— 

10. Miscellaneous : 

High : 

Gas $50.00 

Electricity ... 225.00 

Water 50.00 

Misc 225.00 

550.00 

Elementary : 

Electricity ... $80.00 

Water 50.00 

Misc 170.00 300.00 

6,184.00 

IV. Maintenance and Repairs 

11. High and Elementary $700.00 

V. Auxiliary Agencies 

12. Libraries $50.00 

13. Health 250.00 

14. Transportation 5,500.00 

5,800.00 

VI. Miscellaneous Expenses 

15. Sundries 62.00 

16. Vocational Education 204.00 

17. Evening School 000.00 

266.00 

VII. Outlays 

18. and 19 000.00 

000.00 

Total $47,000.00 



—IBS- 
SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR SUPPORT FOR 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1937 



General Control 

Salary and Expenses of Superintendent . $2,395. 

Expenses of Instruction 

Salaries of Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals: 

Supervisors $1,656.27 

Principal of High School 1,000. 

Principals of Elementary Schools.... 3,440. 

High School Teachers . 15,613. 

Elementary Teachers , . . . . 7,140. 



$28,850.±D 



1 0> 



High School Textbooks $385.71 

Elementary Textbooks 319.90 

High School Stationery and Supplies . . . 736.41 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies . . . 335.51 



$1,777.53 

Expenses of Operation 
High School: 

Wages of Janitor $1,300.00 

Fuel , 714.75 

Miscellaneous 537.49 

$2,552.24 

Elementary: South West Center Total 

Wages of Janitor . . $722.00 $684.00 $640.00 $2,046.00 

Fuel 383.13 272.24 208.71 864.08 

Miscellaneous 108.37 98.89 105.14 312.40 



$1,213.50 $1,055.13 $953.85 $3,222.48 
Total Expenses of Operation $5,774.72 



—184— 

Maintenance and Repairs 

High School $915.20 

South West Center Total 

Elementary $157.04 $70.01 $175.07 $402.12 

Total Maintenance and Repairs $1,317.32 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health . $216.42 

Libraries, 7.25 

Transportation 5,500.00 

Vocational Education 86.86 

Miscellaneous 69.29 

$5,879.82 

Total Expended $45,994.58 

Unexpended Balance 5.42 



$46,000.00 



PAID SUPPORT FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1937 



General Control 

Superintendent, Salary $2,000.00 

Secretary 109.10 

Office Expenses: 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co $82.21 

Wrig-ht & Potter Printing Co 5.09 

Reming'ton Rand Inc., Cards .... 1.30 

J. L. Hammett Co. Envelopes .... 7.63 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., File 

Folders 3.26 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., 

Ribbon 75 

U. S. Post Office, Stamps and En- 
velopes (37.04 

George Richardson, Attendance 

Officer 35.00 

Bostitch-Boston Inc., Staples .... 1.63 

Murphy & Snyder, Letterheads, 

Cards, Tickets 51,95 

Ernest H. Washburn, Pictures . . 10.50 



—185— 

National Education Association, 

Charts 70 

William P. Proctor Co., Bulletin 

Board Material 1.66 

John Wiley & Sons Inc., Book .... 4.32 
Thos. Groom & Co. Inc., hSchool 

Committee Book 5.92 

E. Faulkner Conant, Census .... 35.00 
Fred L. Ward, Study Courses ... 2.00 

— $285.96 

Total General Control $2,395. 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisor's Salary, Drawing* $543.77 

Supervisor's Salary, Music . . . .• 562.50 

Supervisor's Salary, Physical Education 550.00 

^ $1,656.27 

Principal's Salary, High School $1,000.00 

High School Teachers' Salaries: 

Edith Ames $1,284.70 

Elsie Bixby, 6 months . 920.00 

Kathryn Billman, 4 months 440.00 

Marg-aret Boornazian 1,500.00 

George Braman 1,010.00 

Robert Dolan , . 1,420.00 

Richard Greenman 1,440.00 

Walter Holt 1,800.00 

Henry Hopkinson 1,880,00 

Marjorie Jones 1,109.16 

Christine Leavitt . 100.00 

Mary Stolte 1,190.00 

Marion Towne 1,400.00 

Rose Farese, substitute 90.00 

Louise Price, substitute 20.00 

Walter Tierney, substitute 10.00 

$15,613.86 

Principals' Salaries, Elementary: 

Julia McCarthy $1,400.00 

Raymond Nickerson 1,020.00 

Charles Whiteomb 1,020.0!0 

$3,440.00 



—186- 



Elementary Teachers' Salaries : 

Helen Appleby $740.00 

Ruth BergHnd 900.00 

Grace Callanan 900.00 

Elise Dickerman 1,185.00 

Jessie Kinnevan 1,100.00 

Florence Merriam 1,250.00 

Gertrude Puhakka 1,050.00 

Evelyn Reed, substitute 15.00 

High School Textbooks 

Allyn & Bacon $14.20 

American Book Co 71.12 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc. . 19.48 

Dura Binding Co 45.50 

Ginn & Company 25.43 

Harcourt & Brace 64.4G 

D. C. Heath & Co. 63.37 

The Macmiilan Co 43.03 

Charles E. Merrill Co 8.60 

Benj. H. Sanborn Co 30.52 

Elemeiitar>^ Textbooks 

American Book Co $10.69 

Arlo Publishing Co 12.36 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc. 84.60 

Gin & Co 48.82 

D. C. Heath & Co. 27.74 

The Macmiilan Co. . . '. 5.14 

Charles E. Merrill Co 8.60 

Scott, Foresman Co 91.74 

Silver Burdett & Co 30.21 



High School Stationery & Supplies 

A. B. Dick Co., Mimeograph Supplies . . $12.55 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc., Staples, 

Paper, Supplies 48.67 

Brodhead-Garrett Co., Manual Training 

Supplies 163.22 



$7,140.00 



S3S5.71 



$319.90 



—187— 

W. H. Brine Co., Ball .90 

Boston Edison Co., Cord .50 

Roy I. Gottschald, Music 2.88 

Central Scientific Co., Lab. Supplies .... 81.51 

J. L. Hammett Co 44.94 

Frank Johnson, Record Cards 1.06 

Tver Johnson, Basketball 6.16 

Gledhill Bros. Inc., Paper Supplies 64.58 

James W. Brine Co., Whistles, Hockey 

Balls 4.51 

John S. Cheever Co., Paper 12.99 

Milton Bradley Co 80.48 

Murphy & Snyder, Paper, Cardboard .... 6.40 
National Education Association, Physical 

Training Pamphlet .40 

Horace Partridge Co., Scorebook, Basket- 
ball Material , 44.08 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., Goal Posts, Manual 

Training" Material 18.55 

Royal Typewriter Co., Typewriters 112.50 

0. H. Toothaker, Globes 5.00 

West Disinfecting Co., Footbath 12.00 

World Book Co., Tests . , 12.53 



Elementary Stationery and Supplies 
Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc., Globes, Dit- 
to Machines 84.98 

James W. Brine Co., Soccer and Foot- 
balls 18.61 

John S. Cheever Co., Paper 12.99 

A. W. Davis Co., Manual Training Sup- 
plies 8.15 

Gledhill Bros. Inc., Paper, Supplies 61.37 

Frank Johnson, Record Cards 1.06 

J. L. Hammett Co., Paper, Supplies 42.89 

Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, Paper .... 79.75 

Benj. H. Sanborn Co., Workbooks 8.89 

Vanderhoof Hardware Co., Dry Cells ... 2.40 

World Book Co., Tests 14.42 



$736.41 



$335.51 



—188— 

High School Operating Expense 

Daniel MacDougall, Janitor $1,300.00 

Fuel 714.75 

Miscellaneous : 

Acton Motor Co., Gas, Oil $5.10 

American Brush Co., Brushes 7.82 

Boston Edison Co 278.56 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc., Mop 

Pails, etc 11.17 

Beacon Wiper Supply Com- 
pany, Clothes 6.15 

Henry N. Clark Co., Flue 

Brushes 7.45 

Dallman Company, Cleaning 

Cloths 6.20 

A. W. Davis, Shellac, Glass, Oil, 

Rope, Turp 32.38 

Fuller Brush Company 3.50 

J. L. Hammett Co 4.17 

C. B. Dolge Co., Ban, Tilebrite 9.60 
Holmerden Co., Solvent, Brush- 
es 8.58 

William Horner, Wax 7.50 

Masury- Young Co., Oil 19.28 

Strong's Market, Bon ami 55 

McPher son's Hardware, Wire, 

Cement 45 

West & South Water Supply . . 32.43 
West Disinfecting Co., Soap, 

Paper Towels 96.60 

— $537.49 



Total High School Operating Expense $2,552.24 

Elementary Operating Expense 

South W«^^st Center Total 
Janitors . . $722.00 $684.00 $640.00 $2,046.00 
Fuel 383.13 272.24 208.71 864.08 



—189— 

Miscellaneous 

bouth West Center 

Boston Edison Co $34.32 $30.33 $18.98 

Masury- Young Co., oil 6.43 6.41 6.41 

West Disinfecting Co., .... 

towels, soap 20.50 22.98 20.47 

West and South Vv^ater Sup- 
ply 14.81 12.57 29.03 

Beacon Wiper Supply Co., 

cloths 2.06 2.04 2.04 

Wm. M. Horner, wax 2.50 2.50 2.50 

C. B. Dolge Co., ban, tilebrite 3.20 3.20 3.20 . 
Holmerdon Co., solvent .... .50 .-50 .50 

Clarence Robbins, carrying 

rubbish 1.00 1.00 1.00 

American Brush Co., brushes 2.62 2.60 2.60 

Dallman Co., cloths 2.08 2.06 2.06 

J. S. Moore, bon ami, oil .... 2.45 .25 

Parker Hardware, lags .... .75 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement, 

cord 2.25 

Acton Motor Co., greasing . .50 

A. W. Davis Co., seed glass . 6.20 .15 

M. W. Barteaux, lawns .... 5.00 

L. C. Hastings, lawns .... 5.00 

Strong's Market, rinso .... .95 

R. W. Piper, lawns 7.00 

John Evans 6.00 

Spencer Taylor, lawns .... 8.00 

Geo. H. Reed, rake .90 

ISTorman Livermore, lawns . 2.00 

$108.37 $98.89 $105.14 $312.40 
Total Elementary Operating Expenses $3,222.48 

High School Maintenance and Repairs 

American Radiator Co., valves $3.58 

Barnes & Jones, heating system 36.16 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc., shades .... 65.00 

Cooper Coolers, Inc., lathe and motor . . . 75.00 



—190— 

Division of Blind, piano tuning 3.00 

Wilmot B. Cleaves, piano tuning 3.50 

Arthur Freese 35.56 

L. T. Fuilonton, painting 82.50 

Gledhill Bros., Inc., supports 9.19 

Wm. B. Holt 43.30 

M. D. Jones Co., audit, grill work .... 79.75 

Christian Jensen, boiler room ceiling . . 4.00 

B. A. King, electrical 59.99 

E. P. Gates 75 

MacPherson's Hardware, bolts 2.40 

Mass. Reformatory, repair audit, chairs 11.05 
Maynard Machine Shop, sharpen lawn 

mower 3.50 

Parker Hardware Co., door knob, screens 11.20 

John Pederson, driveway 160.00 

Reformatory for Women, fiag 5.05 

Royal Typewriter Co., repairs ........ 10.00 

H. J. Schnair, painting flagpole, corridors 55.00 

Albert E. Sims 18.68 

G. D. Smith, flagpole 22.45 

Typewriter Maintenance Co 4.00 

Frank L. Weaver & Son, roof 27.89 

West Disinfecting Co., filpor 31.40 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., manual training 

shelves 26.00 

0. D. Wood 25.30 

South West Center 
Reformatory for Women, 

flags $3.21 $3.20 S3.25 

L. T, Fuilonton, painting . . . 27.50 27.50 27.50 

0. D. Wood 8.44 8.43 27.43 

Hosea Gould, gravel 14.25 

E. P. Gates, corner irons . . 2.00 

A. W. Davis, paint -70 

L. A. Godfrey 13.05 

Albert E. Sims 11.10 1.25 

Hay ward & Fuilonton, sharp- 
en lawn mower 1-00 



$915.20 



—191— 

W. F. Blaisdell, clock . . 8.00 

George Janvrin, clock .... 2.00 

Mass. Reformatory, kinder- 
garten chairs 19.95 

John Pederson, driveway 

and grading 45.00 50.00 

Arthur L. Freese 13.21 25.43 

Wm. B. Holt 6.65 

Daniel Sheehan 3.00 

Wm. P. Proctor & Co 4.38 4.93 8.01 

Geo. D. Smith, lock 2.00 

Emile Noterman, Jr 2.00 

Gledhill Bros. Inc., black- 
board 22.75 

Walter Jones 5.00 

$157.04 $70.01 $175.07 
Total Elementary Maintenance and Repairs ... $402,12 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Libraries : 

Dura Binding Co., dictionary $2.25 

National Education Assoc, Life of 

Florace Mann . 1.00 

The Literary Digest 4.00 

$7.25 

Health: 

Boston Guild of Plard of Hearing, aud- 
iometer tests 6.42 

Dr. Ernest Mayell, examinations in 

and elementary schools 200^00 

Emerson Hospital, x-ray 10.00 

■ $216.42 

Transportation : 

A. W. Davis $5,500.00 

Tuition : 

Middlesex County Training School, tuition of C. 

Quimby 86.86 



—192— 

Miscellaneous : 

Bon Marche, diploma ribbons $4.00 

Wm. B. Case & Sons, decorations for 

auditorium 6.54 

C. C. Cullinane, express 4.55 

Com. of Massachusetts, film license . . . 2.00 

Laffin's Express .35 

Murphy & Snyder, graduation pro- 
grams, tickets ^ 8.00 

Pierce's Express .50 

Shreve, Crump & Low, engrave shield 1.50 

Vannah Lithograph Co., diplomas .... 41.85 

S69.29 

Total Expended S45,994.58 

Total Unexpended Balance 5.42 



—193- 



Report of the School Superintendent 



To the School Committee and Voters of Acton: 

I hereby submit my third annual report as superintendent 
of schools and principal of the high school (grades 7-12) , cover- 
ing the fiscal year, January 1, 1937 to January 1, 1938, and 
the school year, September 1936 to June 1937. The separate 
reports of the special teachers of music, drawing, physical ex- 
ercise, and manual and domestic arts will be incorporated; the 
reports of the school physician and school nurse follow. Since 
there are no separate reports from the principals of the elemen- 
tary schools (grades 1-6), the superintendent must act as a 
so-cailed supervising principal for those grades. The aim of 
this report is not to deal with present day educational theories 
or trends, but rather to present certain facts and draw obvious 
conclusions, where possible. 

I. School Costs 

1. The real per capita cost of the 497 pupils enrolled on Octo- 
ber 1, 1937 based upon $40', 127. 62, the estimated actual cost 
of schools in 1937, was $80.74. If the insurance char;ge of 
$1,425.22, paid to cover the high school for the next five years, 
is subtracted, the per capita cost was $77.88, which is exactly 
the same as that for the adjusted rate of 1936. 

2. Maintenance and Repairs Completed in 1937. 

a. Elementary schools: extensive work on driveways at 
South and Center; painting of front porches and steps in all 
three schools ; relocation of flag pole at Center ; minor inside 
repairs on stairs, floors, windows, and plumbing. 

b. High school: extensive work on driveway and parking 
space ; painting of window frames, sills, and doors ; painting and 
repair of flag pole; replacement of seven window shades; pur- 
chase of machine lathe; rewiring to adjust manual arts ma- 
chines to F rate; repair of fan room humidifier; repair of boiler 
room roof to cover insurance requirements; installation of iron 
grill railings in auditorium ; painting of lower corridor and base- 
ment floors and stairs. 



—194— 

3. Maintenance and Repairs Proposed for 1938. 

a. Elementary : outside painting of South and West schools ; 
inside painting in all three schools ; completion of work on South 
School driveway; adequate repairs of all gutters and spouts; 
replacement of a considerable number of window frames; 
weatherstripping of outside doors; installation of at least three 
new radiators; waterproofing of basement walls in Center and 
West; renovating of blackboards throughout; many new seats; 
installation of hot water service and base plugs throughout; 
improvement of class room lighting; minor carpentry repairs, 

b. High school: waterproofing of north wall outside of audi- 
torium, replastering and painting inside; proper ventilation of 
science laboratory ; one additional radiator in Room 10. 

The regular budget, in order to meet ordinary expenses and 
the salary of an additional teacher for West Acton, should be 
$47,000. For making urgent repairs in all three elementary 
schools, an article has been presented for the town warrant. 

II. School Membership and Attendance. 

1. Membership: Grades 1-6, on October 1, 1937, 253; on 
January 2, 1938, 259. The average of Grades 1-6, from 1926 
through 1936, was 258; Grades 7-12, on October 1, 1937, 244; 
on January 2, 1938, 241. The average for Grades 7-12, 1926 
through 1936, was 244. Thus, over a period of twelve years, 
membership has remained about the same. Probably this holds 
true of the population of Acton. Each year, as many pupils 
move into town as move out. 

2. Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1937. 

Age 
Grade 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Total 



1 


15 


17 


17 


2 












51 


2 




7 


21 


6 












34 


3 






13 


23 


6 










42 


4 








6 


21 


11 


1 






39 


5 










10 


25 


6 


3 


1 


45 


6 












9 


18 


12 


3 


42 



253 



—195— 

3. Teacher Loads in Grades 1-6, as of January 1, 1938. 



Grade 


Center 


South 


West 


1 & 2 


20 


38 


31 


3 & 4 


20 


32 


31 


5 & 6 


19 


31 


37 



From the above, it is evident that the teacher load is very 
unevenly distributed. There is no evidence that the situation 
will change in the coming year. Two alternatives are open, either 
to shift one teacher from the Center School or add another 
teacher for the West School, as we have already done for the 
South. The second alternative is preferable, because the first 
would leave the Center School with three grades per teacher. 

4. Attendance. 

a. Absence and Tardiness. 

The attendance for 1936-1937 has been very satisfactory. This 
appears to be due in part to constant pressure for good atten- 
dance and to improved transportation. The Center School, where 
almost 70% are transported, has the fewest cases of absence 
and tardiness; the West School, where a less number propor- 
tionately are transported, has the largest percentage of absence 
and tardiness. So many pupils are transported, that, ordinarily, 
when the busses can safely run, there is no real reason to close 
schools, with the result that only one day was lost because of 
weather conditions. Busses take children home at noon from the 
elem.entary schools, when afternoon sessions are called off be- 
cause of weather. 

Mr. George Richardson, attendance officer, and Mrs. Creeley, 
school nurse, have been very helpful in checking absence by 
visiting homes. Mr. Richardson made 23 home visits and at- 
tended court four times. 

One elementary school principal has wisely suggested that 
parents be urged to send the required written excuses with the 
children for absence or tardiness, thereby relieving the child of 
embarrassment caused when the teacher asks for the excuse 
and the child has to confess that his parent neglected to furnish 
one. 



136-1937 


Sept. 


-Dec. 


1937 


93.34 




95.72 




94.50 




96.83 




130 




122 




60 




50 





—196— 

1. Per Cent of Attendance. 

1935-1936 
Grades 1-6 91.11 

Grades 7-12 92.29 

2. Tardy Cases (Sept.-Dec.) 
Grades 1-6 130 
Grades 7-12 197 

A consolidated elementary school would still further improve 
elementary school attendance. 

All three elementary school principals feel that a one-session 
day would help conditions. The chief reasons for this belief are : 
distance non-bus students must walk back and forth at noon in 
slightly inclement weather, the large number of the same pupils 
who already bring lunches, the present problem of dressing and 
undressing in outer clothing at two different recesses, and the 
earlier dismissal permitting "freedom of longer play at their 
own homes". Whether the change from two sessions to one is 
advisable under present conditions is still open to argument, 
but the suggestion is worth thinking about. 

b. Holding Power of High School. 

The class graduating in 1935 (28) retained 47% of the num- 
ber which entered in grade 9; 1936 (30) 597c ; 1937 (31) 59% ; 
1938 (37 at present) probably 55% ; 1939 (27 at present) possi- 
bly 59%. In short, the per cent which remains in high school 
to graduate is fairly constant. But the State average is prob- 
ably higher than that for Acton, and our aim should be to raise 
our own percentage. 

III. Health and Physical Education. 

1. General. 

The above attendance records show that the general health 
of the pupils has been good. There have been no epidemics. A 
careful check-up is made by general physical examinations at the 
beginning of each school year and by periodic examinations of 
the athletes (boys and girls) before each seasonal sport. In ad- 
dition, eyes, ears, teeth, lungs, and posture are checked. In 
particular, the new dental clinic, the diphtheria immunization 
clinic, and tuberculin test clinic, described by the reports of the 
school physician and school nurse, were extensively used. 28% 



—197— 

of the pupils took the tuberculin test in 1935, 56% in 1936, 62% 
in 1937, showing that misunderstanding in regard to the value 
of this test is disappearing. 

4731/^ quarts of free milk were distributed to pupils in 1937, 
an increase of 66 quarts over 1936. Both the milk and dental 
clinic funds were made possible by faculty plays and annual 
contributions from the West Acton and Acton Center Women's 
Clubs, the Neighborhood Club, the American Legion, and indi- 
viduals. This help has been most acceptable and vv'ill be. needed 
again after June of this year. 

2. Physical Exercise. 

Every boy and girl in the Acton schools must participate in 
the regular physical training classes or organized athletics, un- 
less excused by a doctor's certificate. The exercise is usually not 
formal but takes the form of group games, vv^hich have social as 
well as health value. Unfortunately, the high school schedule 
does not permit more than one period per week for boys and two 
for girls, but there has been a noticeable improvement in weight. 
Groups comprising Grades 8-12 have been conducted by Mr. 
Dolan, Mr. Holt, and Mr. Greenman. 

In organized teams for boys, Mr. Dolan, during 1937, coached 
20 boys for 8 football games, 18 for 21 basketball games, and 18 
for 10 baseball games. While victories have been few, the boys 
have shown consistent, good sportsmanship and morale, due to 
Mr. Dolan's enthusiasm and interest. Possibly, certain star 
athletes have been kept from playing by the weekly check-up of 
scholarship and attitude, and by necessary outside work, but, 
ordinarily, a boy can find time to participate in sports and main- 
tain a satisfactory record in studies. 

Miss Eleanor Jones has done very creditable work in super- 
vising the girls in all the grades and the boys in Grades 1-7. 
Aside from games in soccer, basketball, baseball, and field hockey, 
she has conducted groups in dancing, marching, and gymnastics. 
In organized athletics, 50 girls participated in interschool bas- 
ketball, winning five out of eight games, and 37 in hockey, se- 
curing very good results. In addition, there have been numerous 
interclass games in baseball, soccer, hockey, and basketball. Over 
60 letters and numerals were awarded for participation in or- 
ganized sports, thus definitely reaching 25% of the students in 
Grades 7-12. 



-1 OS- 



Seventy students took part in the annual evening demonstra- 
tion at the high school in May, which included marching tactics, 
pyramids, dances, and calisthenics. 

In brief, to quote Miss Jones, the physical education program 
tries to teach care of body and mind, many qualities of good 
character, actual desire to participate in outdoor games in leisure 
time, and the proper spirit toward victory and defeat. 

3. Financing Athletics. 

The athletic association has attem.pted to conduct athletics in 
a business-like manner and to furnish good equipment, trans- 
portation, and officials. In follovving out these aims, the receipts 
on the field or at the doors will probably continue to be far from 
adequate. They must be subsidized through various forms of 
student activities. Football caused the heaviest deficit; base- 
ball, strangely, the least. 



Receipts 



Dues 

Magazine Drive . . 

Dance . 

Gifts (Class et al) 
Movies 



$ 



187.70 
187.91 
64.59 
21.47 
34.10 
52.80 



Expenditures 

Officials $ 141.50 

Equipment 224.64 

Transport 94.00 

Janitor, Police . 31.50 

Miscellaneous . 32.50 



$ 548.57 
Favorable Balance . 



? 



524.14 



$24.43 



It should be admitted that the school committee paid an equip- 
ment bill of slightly over S30.00, but the students carried the 
bulk of the burden. Perhaps this steady support, during a year 
of few victories, is a definite indication of real school spirit and 
co-operation. 

4. Other Activities. 

In the elementary schools, Miss Berglind, Miss Kinne^^an, and 
Mrs. Stearns have continued faithfully to carry on 4-H clubs for 
the girls. These 4-H clubs gave a good account of themselves in 
the county competition at Groton. However, there are no or- 
ganizations as yet for boys. Here is a real need. A consolidation 
of the three schools would give more opportunity for various 
clubs and activities. 



—199— 

In the high school, there were ten clubs or organizations. 
Moreover, the students conducted 13 of the 30 assemblies, ran 
four socials, and gave two public plays. In assemblies not con- 
ducted by students, there were seven outside speakers, a W. P. 
A. orchestra of 20 pieces, and a string trio from the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, Special assemblies were also held in 
commemoration of Horace Mann, Washington and Lincoln, Me- 
morial Day, and the Constitution. Field trips were conducted for 
the science, domestic arts, and agricultural club groups. The 
agricultural club (22 boys) began its third year under the direc- 
tion of Mr. George Erickson. and Mr. Frank Braman. The 
course, planned on a three-year basis, comprises dairying, ag- 
ronomy, and the study of insects and pests. Again, many visiting 
lecturers from the State College at Amherst and the County Ex- 
tension Service are giving the boys, without charge, excellent 
practical demonstrations and talks. 

The Carlos B. Clark Acton history essays, written and pre- 
sented by seniors in the third annual competition, demonstrated 
much original research and literary skill. Each year the task 
of preparing new material and original interpretations becomes 
more difficult. 

Mention should be made of the work done for various organi- 
zations in the community by Miss Boornazian and students in 
her commercial classes. They have typed, mimeographed, and 
directed thousands of letters and notices. 

On the whole, these many student activities are developing 
initiative, responsibility, and self-reliance. 

IV. Scholarship. 

Mental but no standardized achievement tests were given in 
1937 in the elementary schools, but the progress in fundamentals 
is as satisfactory as could be expected under a two-grade per 
teacher system. History in Grades 4, 5, and 6 is in the process 
of standardization similar to that achieved in English, arithme- 
tic, and geography. 

In the high school, improvement has been apparent. An ave- 
rage of 20% of the students made the honor roll in 1936-1937, 
25% during the last four months. There have been fewer de- 
ficiency cards. To help raise the average level the following 
factors are receiving increased attention: 



—200— 

a. A check-up and improvement of study habits, based upon 
questionnaires and conferences. The mimeographed program of 
studies for Grades 7-12, issued to every student last May, sug- 
gested the amount of home study expected for each grade and 
should receive serious attention. 

b. A more intensive educational guidance program, based 
upon questionnaires and conferences, and aided by outside 
speakers and books on vocations. The questionnaires, as m^ght 
be expected, evidenced inadequate reasons for selecting par- 
ticular curriculums, especially the college preparatory. Hovv^- 
ever, students possessed more definite ideas in regard to future 
occupations. For example, 31 looked forward to clerical v/ork, 
16 to teaching, 16 to mechanical work, 13 to nursing, etc. 

c. Division of English classes into A and B sections, through- 
out the seven grades, regardless of curriculum. These divisions 
were based upon Iowa Reading Tests, I. Q.'s, and estimates of 
the two English teachers. Much better results are already ap- 
parent. 

d. Greater use of the 1050 books in the Conant Library and 
of public library books by increased requirements in outside 
reading. The school library, augmented by several reference 
books, has functioned very satisfactorily under the direction of 
Miss Stolte and her library council. It might be mentioned here 
that one student has helped materially in clercial work for the 
library under the federal N. Y. A., while another, under this 
student aid, is assisting Mr. MacDougall. The public library 
service should be increased for minors and adults by another open 
afternoon and evening and the creation of branch service at 
South and West Acton. 

In the matter of entrance to college, while the high school is 
certified by the New England Council, the State Departm.ent of 
Education, and recently Worcester Tech, many students are 
prevented from continuing their education because of financial 
reasons. Hence, there is urgent need of a scholarship fund of 
at least $4,000.00, offering about $120.00 in interest annually. 
At present, a scholarship fund of about $286.05, begun by gradu- 
ating classes some years ago, exists in Maynard banks. Using 
this as a basis, a move ought to be begun to establish a perma- 
nant, adequate amount for needy and deserving students. 



—201— 

e. Class of 1937. 

The 31 graduates of June, 1937 are now occupied as follows : 
2 in college (Chicago University and Simmons College) ; 6, other 
institutions; 3, Post Graduates; 4 on farms; 2 in stores; 4, 
maids ; 2, general work ; 2 in factories ; 1 in office ; 4 at home ; 1 
married. In short, 36% are continuing formal education; 48% 
are engaged in gainful occupations; and 16% are not engaged 
in either gainful occupations or formal education. 

V. Domestic and Mamial Arts. 

1. Domestic Arts (Girls) 

Briefly, the domestic arts teacher outlined her work in the 
high school as follows : 

7th Grade — Clothing, one period daily. 
8th Grade — Foods, two periods daily. 

9th Grade—First half year, hygiene and dietetics; second 
half year, advanced food work, one period daily. 
10th Grade^ — Homemaking, one period daily. 
11th and 12th Grades — Lunch room management, prepar- 
ation of school luncheons. 
This brief summary gives only a small idea of the excellent 
work done and interest shown in domestic arts. 

CAFETERIA REPORT 

Cash on hand, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 11.01 

Total sales for year 1,712,09 

Cost of supplies for cooking, sewing, 

and replacement $ 1,434.18 

Milk 169.06 

Special lunches for teachers and pu- 
pils 61.27 

Cash on hand, Dec. 31, 1937 ....... 58.59 

? 1,723.10 $ 1,723.10 

A substantial part of the favorable balance on hand will soon 
be spent in the purchase of equipment. 

2. Manual Arts. (Boys) 

A majority of the 91 students enrolled are drawn from 
Grades 7-9. The general character of their work is group work, 
while the older students from Grades 10-12 perform more in- 



—202— 

dividual shop work. The former handle wood, learning the care 
and use of ordinary carpenters' tools and the construction of 
models and useful articles. The latter are employed under a 
general shop arrangement and learn to use machinery and to do 
simple forms of cabinet work. Often, boys construct and repair 
objects for their own homes. 

Equipment is replaced and added each year. The most im- 
portant recent addition was a back-geared screw cutting lathe 
for wood and metal, which was secured second-hand in good 
condition for a very reasonable sum. The department is in need 
of a second-hand automobile engine for instructional purposes, 
and a gas line and burner for soldering and melting. 

Due to lack of space, classes had to be subdivided and meet 
less often than five times per week. This handicap, in part, 
prevents completion of work and proper planning. 

VI. Drawing and Music. 

1. Drawing. 

Mr. Frank Braman visits the elementary schools on two days 
and the high school on two days. He has been successful in in- 
teresting the younger and older boys and girls in desiring to 
learn to draw after gaining more muscular control, engage in 
poster competitions, and appreciate good art. He has also begun 
correlation of art with English, geography, and history, es- 
pecially in connection with the Horace Mann projects. Attempts 
will be made to increase this correlation, to develop originality 
and creative work, and to encourage more students in Grades 
9-10 voluntarily to enter the drawing classes. 

2. Music. 

No report was received this year, but in general the work 
proceeded satisfactorily in Grades 1-8 but not in Grades 9-12. 
It is difficult to secure one person who can handle adequately the 
vocal music in all the grades, along with music appreciation and 
the orchestra. Nevertheless, a serious attempt will be made to 
improve the situation, which does not appear hopeless, by any 
means. Before long, an upright piano should be secured for the 
high school auditorium in place of the grand piano, which needs 
extensive repairs and occupies too much space. 



—203— 

VII. Cliaiiges in Teaching Staff — Other Changes. 

There were two changes in the high school faculty and one 
addition in the elementary schools. Miss Elsie Bixby (Mrs. Wai- 
ter Gordon) , commercial teacher, resigned in July to be married, 
and was succeeded by Miss Kathryn Billman, a graduate of the 
University of New Hampshire and a student at Columoia and 
Boston University. She had also completed one year of success- 
ful otiice experience. To follow Mrs. Gordon, who had iilled her 
position so ably and faithfully for ten years, was no easy task, 
but Miss Billman has succeeded well in teaching and in coaching. 
Mrs. Gordon's untimely death in December was a shock to her 
many friends in Acton. Miss Ames, domestic arts teacner, re- 
signed in December to enter business after ten successful years. 
Miss Christine Leavitt, a graduate of Framingham State Teach- 
ers College, with real teaching experience, followed and gave 
ample proof of good work from the very beginning of her term. 
Miss Helen Appleby was employed as a regular additional teach- 
er in the South School in January and has been very helpful. 

In December, Mr. Ralph Rogers succeeded Mr. Forbes as jani- 
tor at the Center School. Mr. Leonard Godfrey succeeded Mr. 
John Evans at the West School, who was forced to stop because 
of severe illness. Mr. Evans has the sincere sympathy of the 
teachers and townspeople. 
Conclusion. 

The superintendent wishes to acknowledge the kind gifts to 
the schools made during the year by Mr. Carlos B. Clark, Mr. 
Arthur E. Davis for six of his own paintings of Acton, country- 
side, and the various organisations in town. He feels particular- 
ly grateful to the school committee and the special committee for 
their interest and co-operation during the discussions concern- 
ing a consolidated elementary school. Citizens forget, at times, 
that the school committee meets faithfully twice each month and 
gives generously of its time, without pay. He is indebted to Mr. 
Milbery for his constant help in securing school publicity, and 
again, he desires to express thanks to the teachers, who have 
been most loyal and helpful, and to the townspeople for their 
friendly interest in school betterment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. HALL, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



—204- 



REPOET OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Walter F. Hall, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
South Acton, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as School Physician. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed November 

Our pre-school clinic was conducted this past year by the 
State, and our diphtheria immunization clinics were held in May 
and June. 

It is gratifying to know that so many are taking advantage of 
our diphtheria immunization clinic. 

Extra examinations were held for those taking part in sports 
as a part in physical training. 

Dental climes were held in the lower grades. 

The general physical condition of the school population is 
good. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



—205— 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Walter F. Hall, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Acton, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as School Nurse. The 
routine physical examinations were made as early in the school 
year as possible, that the condition of the pupils might be known 
to parents, teachers, and to the nurse. The following list tells 
the story of defects found by school physician at this examina- 
tion : 

Teeth .. 235 

Tonsils 67 

Glands 139 

Heart 34 

Skin 10 

Malnutrition 14 

The number of children requiring dental care has always been 
a major problem, as only a relatively small number have periodic 
attention from a dentist. The past year a school dental clinic was 
started which will help to improve this situation. The clinic 
dentist was Dr. W. J. S. McNally, of Somerville, who was very 
successful in his work with the children. Although the clinic 
operated but a short time at each of the elementary schools, the 
following work was completed : 

Number of Children treated 81 

Number of cleanings 81 

Number of fillings (amalgam) 1st teeth, 97 — 2nd teeth, 256 

Number of fillings (cement) 1st teeth, 24 — 2nd teeth, 3 

Number of fillings (porcelain) 1st teeth, — 2nd teeth, 37 

Number of extractions 1st teeth, 146 — 2nd teeth, 14 
Totals 352 fillings — 160 extractions 

We hope for a return of the clinic sometime in the spring. 



—206— 

The pre-school clinic was mciuded in a vveli-Chilcl Conierence, 
conducted by the Massachusetts State Deparmienc oi Healtii, ac 
Acton Center, in May. A group of 21 ciiiidren were examined 
by a physician, nutritionist, and dental hygienist. Defects were 
noted for correction before entering school. 

A school health program includes many clinics, one of w^hich 
is particularly helpful to the pupil of high school age. It is 
called "The School Clinic" and tests are given to determine any 
contact to tuberculosis. The work is done by personnel from the 
Middlesex County Hospital at Waltham. Before the program 
was started, as an educational feature, pupils were invited to see 
a film called ''Behind the Shadows" which told the story of Tu- 
berculosis, its prevention and treatment. The number of parent 
requests for this test was greater than that of last year. The 
report of the clinic was as follows : 

School Clinic Population, Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 161 

Children Tuberculin Tested for first time 90 

Children Tuberculin Tested before 10 

— 100 

Per cent tested 62.1 

Of children tested, 23 were x-rayed, 3 had physical examina- 
tions and were found to be negative cases and discharged. This 
clinic will be repeated the coming year. 

We have very few cases of diphtheria today because our 
children have been given treatments to prevent them from con- 
tracting this disease. This immunization program was held in 
June and is an annual one. The Schick test is to determine im- 
munity ; it was given to 44 children, of whom 36 were found to be 
negative. Three injections of Toxoid at weekly intervals were 
given to 40 school and 16 pre-school children. It is important to 
have this protection given at an early age. 

It was possible to send two children to our South-west Middle- 
sex Health Camp at Bolton for a period of 4 weeks each. This 
vacation, which includes health training, was made possible by 
the money received from the sale of Christmas Seals. 



i 



—207— 

All schools are visited daily when possible, and the work has 
been carried on as follows : 

Special examinations of pupils 1502 

Simple dressings 384 

Home visits to pupils 360 

Sanitary inspections 130 

Classroom inspections 12 

Taken home ill 26 

Communicable disease 10 

Taken to Eye Specialist 9 

Taken to physician 12 

Taken to dentist 11 

This work has been made interesting and more helpful because 
I have received assistance and support from the superintendent, 
school physician, and teachers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



-208— 



GRADUATES OF 1937 



William Alfred Andersen 
Margaret Andersen 
Vesta Lorraine Balsor 
Irene Gertrude Barritt 
Stanley Walter Bondelevitch 
Russell Leighton Briggs 
Franklin Charter 

*Rita Belle Dunivan 

^Esther May Durkee 
John Francis Fallon 

^Isabel Inez Fogarty 
Alfred Grover Gilbert 
Arlene Blanche Hayward 

*Lucille Grace Hayward 

*Norman Everett Hollowell 

'''Ruth Armstrong Horton 

* Honor Students 



Margraetta Grace Lawrence 

* Olive Milbery 
*Ruth Barbara Noll 

Hazel Rita Olsen 

* Carolyn Adelaide Parker 
Kenneth Herbert Perkins 

*Ralph Waldo Piper, Jr. 

*Elizabeth Reed 
Leo Thomas Roche 
Charles Proctor Taylor 
Leo Francis Thatcher 
Wilbur Jones Tolman 

*Hurburt Otis Wamboldt 

*Phyllis Louise Webb 

*Marv Whitcomb 



Student Essays : 

Isabel I. Fogarty — ''The Spirit of Horace Mann" 
Ralph W. Piper, Jr. — 'Teaching Democracy" 

Awards During Year: 

Mary Whitcomb: Carlos B. Clark Acton History Award. Es- 
ther M. Durkee, Ralph W. Piper, Jr.: American Legion 
Awards for best rank in Scholarship, Loyalty, and Achieve- 
ment (Edwards-Quimby Post). 

Esther M. Durkee : Washington-Franklin Medal for best record 
in American History (Massachusetts Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution). 



INDEX 



Aid to Dependent Children 27 

Accountant . 99 

Appointments Made by Selectmen 1937 5 

Assessors' Report '. . . 73 

Auditor . 146 

Board of Health • • • • 81 

Cemetery Commissioners 55 

Dog Officer 71 

Finance Committee 19 

Fire Department 78 

Forest ¥/arden . 79 

Goodnow Fund 84 

Inspector of Animals 70 

Jury List 54 

Librarian's Report 89 

Middlesex County Extension Service 85 

Old Age Assistance 26 

Police Department 69 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 87 

Selectmen's Report 22 

State Audit 147 

Superintendent of Moth Control 72 

Superintendent of Streets 72 

Tax Collector 74 

Town Clerk 40 

Births 41 

Marriages 43 

Deaths 46 

Non-Resident Burials 48 

Dog Licenses 50 

Town Meetings : 

Annual Meeting 28 

Special Town Meteing, October 4, 1937 35 

Town Nurse 83 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 9 



Treasurer 134 

Elizabeth White Fund 141 

Cemetery Funds 139 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 143 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 143 

Cemetery Surplus Fund 144 

West Acton-Firemen's Relief Fund 144 

Wilde Memorial Library Fund 142 

Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 144 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 137 

Tree Warden 80 

Welfare Department 25 

Welfare, Department of Public 27 

WPA Sewing Project 26 

Zonin.sf Committee 24 



'O 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Committee 179 

Comparison of Cost 180 

Estimate of Expenditurs for 1938 181 

Graduates, 1937 208 

Organization 176 

Paid for Support, 1937 184 

School Nurse 205 

School Physician 204 

School Superintendent 193 

Standing Rules 177 

Summary of Expenses 183 

Teachers in Service 178 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 

1938 



ANNUAL REPORT 



/ y'L^lAAA^ 



/• 





OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 



1938 



— 3— 

Town Officers, 1938 



Moderator, 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1939 

Raymond F. Durkee Term expires 1940 

Ralph W Piper Term expires 1941 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Henry L. Haynes Term expires 1939 

Lloyd W. Priest Term expires 1939 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1941 

Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfai*e 

Carl E. Backman Term expires 1939 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1940 

Raymond L. Hatch Term expires 1941 

Constables 

George A. Braman Robert G. Willett 

Michael Foley Norman L. Perkins 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Wendell F Davis Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle . Term expires 1940 

Fred W. Green Term expires 1941 



— 4— 

School Committee 

Avis Howe Term expires 1939 

Randall N. Wood worth Term expires 1939 

Louisa N- Wood Term expires 1940 

Everett N. Montague Term expires 1940 

Evelyn K. Reed Term expires 1941 

Samuel E. Know^lton Term expires 1941 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

Frank A, Merriam Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1941 

Board of Health 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1939 

0. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1940 

Lillian E. Taylor Term expires 1941 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1939 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1940 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1941 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1939 

A. N. Hederstedt Term expires 1940 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1941 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1939 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1940 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1941 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1939 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1941 



—5— 

Appointments Made by Selectmen — 1938 



Executive Clerk 

Vir^nia Milbery 

Office: Town Hall Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30; 

Board of Public Welfare, Monday evenings at 7:00. 

Finance Committee 

Murray Brown William T. Merriam 

Alfred W. Davis Webster S. Blanchard 

Alden C. Flagg • Howard J. Billings 

Superintendent of Streets 

A. H. Perkins 

Towii Accountant 

Howard L. Jones Term expires 1941 

Rcigistrars of Voters 

Daniel W. Sheehan Term expires 1939 

Waiter L. O'Neil Term expires 1940 

Arthur Lee Term expires 1941 

Horace F. Tuttle Ex-Officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — James W. Coughlin 
Clerk — Arthur W. Wayne 
Inspector — Arthur F. Davis 
Inspector — Paul G. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — George A. Murphy 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — S. E. Knowlton 
Deputy Inspector — Leo F. McCarthy 



— 6— 

Precinct II 
Warden — Clare A. Milbery 
Clerk — Thomas Yetman 
Inspector — Clarence Robbins 
Inspector — Timothy Hennessey 
Deputy Warden — Reginald Stoney 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Frank A. Merriam 
Deputy Inspector — Sophia Walsh 

Precinct III 
Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Clerk — Peter Duggan 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Frank McDonald 
Deputy Warden — Frederick Whitcomb 
Deputy Clerk — Daniel J. Hurley 
Deputy Inspector — Harry Holt 
Deputy Inspector — John J. Duggan 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog OflScer 

Arthur Fraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Clare A. Milbery 

Superintendent of Town Forest 
Albert R. Jenks 



— 7— 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Bertram D. Hall Charles E. Smith 

George H. Reed 



Michael Foley 



Field Drivers 

George A. Braman 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James J. Knight 

Police Officers 

Michael Foley, Chief 



Norman Perkins 



George A. Braman 



Norman Perkins 



Robert G. Willett 

Burial Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 
Waldo J. Flint 



George H. Reed 
William Braman 
A. W. Davis 
F. D. Harrington 
M. B. Ferber 
Philip Newell 
Williard Houghton 
W H. Soar 



Public Weighers 

Alfred Davis, Jr. 
G. Howard Reed 
W. H. Francis Davis 
Thomas Hearon 
Fred Burke 
Fred Stone 
Albert S. Braman 
Clarence E. Braman 



— 9— 

TOWN WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex ss. 







To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said County, 
Greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are 
hereby directed to notify the legal voters in said town of Acton, 
quaiiiied to vote at town meetings for the transaction of town 
affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universahst Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'cock, noon, Monday the sixth day of March, 1939, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least before 
the sixth day of March. 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following town 
officers : Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of taxes, 
one selectman for three years ; one assessor for three years ; one 
assessor for one year to fill vacancy; one member of the board 
of public welfare for three years ; four constables for one year ; 
one cemetery commissioner for three years; one cemetery com- 
missioner for two years to fill vacancy; two members of the 
school committee for three years; one member of the board of 



—10— 

health for three years ; one trustee Memorial Library for three 
years ; and one tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock, noon, and close at 8 o'clock 
p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Commonwealth 
to notify the leg^al voters of said Town of Acton, as aforesaid, to 
meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton on Monday, the thirteenth 
day of March at 7 o'clock p. m., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any commit- 
tees chosen at any previous meeting that have not already re- 
ported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual ex- 
penses of the several departments of the town and determine 
how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire depart- 
ment, or vote anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush lires 
and fix a price thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum of moneO'" to insure the employees of the town or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the payment of premiums on all 
town officers' bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow money 



from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1939, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 11. To see if the town will votei to employ a public 
health nurse, and raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
maintenance of same. 

Article 12. To see; if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,20(^00 or any other sum for the suppression 
of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the care of shade trees or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) for the re- 
demption of tax titles held by the town. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $225.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reimbursed 
for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, from 
the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton; said money 
to be used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted 
by the State or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any 
other action in relation thereto. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the specific repairs and widenings of 
School Street, South Acton; said money to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or County, 
or both, for this purpose; or take any other action in relation 
thereto. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00 for the maintenance of Jones Com- 
munity Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 



—12— 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000.00 for the Work Relief Fund, or afcjt 
anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as re- 
quired by law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, 
maintenance, and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis 
Hospital, as assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 111 of the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and 
in addition thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G 
(6) (a) of the Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation 
thereto. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money sufficient to rebuild that portion of road 
in West Acton known as Central Street, beginning at its inter- 
section with Massachusetts Avenue, so-called, thence northerly 
to a point formerly rebuilt near the residence of Millard J. Hand- 
ley, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $550.00 or any other sum to purchase new 
fire hose. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase additional equipment for 
fighting brush fires or act anything thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills for 1938 
or do or act anything thereon. 

General Government $459.30 

Buildings and Grounds 94.70 

Fire Department 15.00 

Board of Health 85.27 

Town Nurse 26.74 

Highways 19.25 

Public Welfare 549.44 

Branch Library 10.00 

Dog Officer . 4.00 



Total $1,263.70' 



—13— 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to transfer 1700.00 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account and the 
purchase of a hone for the road department, or act am^hing 
thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,200.00 to purchase a truck for the Street 
Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to appoint a com- 
mittee composed of one veteran and one non-veteran from each 
of the three precincts of the town, to purchase the truck for the 
Street Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to accept the layout 
as made by the Selectmen of a stree.t in South Acton leading 
northwesterly from Main Street toward the Marlboro Branch 
railroad tracks a distance of approximately 200 feet to a point 
beyond the residence of L. Edward Laird. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof seven days at least before the time of said meet- 
ing as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the time of meet- 
ing as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this first day of February, 
1939. 

A true copy. Attest: 

JAMES E. KINSLEY 
RALPH W. PIPER 
RAYMOND F. DURKEE 

Selectmen of Acton 

MICHAEL FOLEY 

Constable of Acton 



—14— 

Report of Finance Committee 



In submitting- our recommendations for the ensuing year we 
call the attention of the voters to the fact that additional State 
taxes for 1938 and 1939 will make necessary the raising- of at 
least $10,000.0^0 more than the amount required for this item 
last year. Also it is probable that thef amount received on 
account of income taxes will be less than in 1938. 

These items alone will undoubtedly add approximately $3i)0 
per §1,000.00 to our tax rate. 

1 

There are also many other items over which the voters have 
little or no control, such as Welfare, Old Age Assistance and 
Soldiers' Relief. 

To decrease the appropriation for those departments over 
which the voters do have complete control, enough to offset the 
above items, will result in drastic cuts in services which the 
Town has established and we believe that the responsibility 
for such reduction of service should rest with the voters. 

The amounts we are recommending for the several regular 
departments are in our opinion the minimum required to main- 
tain the present standards. 

We have approved two special road appropriations under Arti- 
cles 16 and 17 which we would recommend passing over this 
year except for the fact that they carry substantial allotments 
of State and County money which undoubtedly helps the un- 
employment situation in Town. 

Recommendations: 
Highways, General maintenance — 

Villages $1,150.00 

Chapter 81 8,850.00 

Chapter 90 2,000.00 

Education 47,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,500.00 

Memorial Library, current expenses . . 1,000.00 - 
Memorial Library, expenses branch 

service 300.00 



—15— 

Memorial Library, books 200.00 '^ 

Hydrant Service 3,128.00 "^ 

General Government 6,500.00 " ^ • 

Building and Grounds 1,500.00 " 

Cemeteries 1,450.00 ^ 

Military Aid 150.00> 

State Aid 600.00 

Soldier Relief 2,500.00 

Police Department 2,500.00' 

Board of Health 1,200.00 

Public Health, Nurse, Salary, Art. 11 2,000.00 

Public Health, Nurse, Expenses, Art. 11 200100 

Welfare, Temporary Aid 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,000.00 

Tree Warden, care of shade trees — 

Art. 13 700.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Notes and Bonds 5,500.00 

Interest on Bonds and Notes 572.50 

Interest on Revenue Loans 250.00 

Memorial Day — Art. 5 275.00 

Fire Department— Art. 6 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Gypsy Moth Work— Art. 12 1,200.00 

Liability Insurance — Art. 8 1,000.00 

Treasurer, Collector and Clerk Bonds — 

Art. 9 253.00 

County Hospital Maintenance — Art. 20 994.23 

Fire Department, New Hose— Art. 22 300.00 

Redemption Tax Titles— Art 14 100.00 

Expense, Dog Officer— Art. 15 225,00 

Main Street Improvement — Art. 16 ... . 3,500.00 

School Street widening— Art. 17 1,000.00 

Jones Athletic Field— Art. 18 300.00 

Work Relief— Art. 19 2,000.00 

Total $129,397.73 



—16— 

Article 21. Recommend no action. 

Article 22. Recommend this article include brush fire hose. 

Article 23. Recommend no action. 

Article 25. Recommend the transfer of $700.00 from Ma- 
chinery Fund to the Machinery Account and purchase of a hone 
for the road department. 

Article 26. Recommend no action as the money appropriated 
last year is still available. 

Recommend appropriating" the sum of $1,450.00 for Ceme- 
teries, $1,300:00 to be raised and $150.00 transferred from Cem- 
etery Land Fund. 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,500.00 from Overlay 
Surplus Account for the Reserve Fund. 

Precinct 1 — Murray Brown, Alden C. Flagg. 
Precinct 2 — Howard J. Billings, William T. Merriam. 
Precinct 3 — Webster S. Blanchard, Alfred W. Davis. 



—17— 
Selectmen's Report 



We submit, herewith, the reports of the various departments 
of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1938, also, all of 
the actions under the different articles voted at the last annual 
Town meeting and the Special Town Meetings. 

Executive Clerk 

The board found it necessary to hire a full time clerk for the 
Selectmen and Welfare departments. The board was fortunate 
in securing Miss Virginia Milbery for this position, who has 
proven a conscientious public servant. This action was necessi- 
tated by the work required by W. P. A., Welfare and Old Age 
Assistance. The services of the clerk are available to all de- 
partments of the town. 

Chapter 9Q Roads 

The Main Street improvement was continued this year after 
a late start, due to the town receiving the contract late in the 
season. The Department of Public Works recommends the re- 
moval of the bog on this road and the construction of a bridge 
at an estimated cost of $17,000. The board believes it is good- 
business for the town to join the state and county in building 
chapter 90 roads. 

The tentative set-up for 1939 on Main Street is^Town $3,500, 
County $3,500, State $7,000, Total $14,000 ; School Street, South 
Acton— Town $1,000, County $1,000, State $2,000, Total $4,000. 
The town will receive $13,500 from the state and county by rais- 
ing $4,500. 

The board recommends the continuance of the construction 
of Main Street and specific widenings on School Street, South 
Acton. 

Chapter 81 Roads 

The board did not receive the contract on Chapter 81 until 
June this year making the work late on all our roads. The De- 
partment of Public Works advised the board that the town will 
be required to live up to the letter of the law on all Chapter 81 
work for the year 1939. This ruling will prohibit the spending 
of any of this money on village streets. The present appropria- 



—18— 

tion of $1,150 for village work will prevent any amount of work 
on village streets. The board asks your favorable consideration 
of an increase in this appropriation. 

Snow Removal and Sandin,g 

The town has six trucks plowing snow that are giving satis- 
factory service. The board has increased the sanding of icy 
roads as a safety measure. This work is costly to the town and 
the board invites the advice of the citizens at the annual meet- 
ing on this matter. 

Street Lighting 

The board has received requests from property owners for 
more street hghts, but has not been able to grant their requests 
because the present appropriation does not permit more lights. 
The board is of the opinion that the annual meeting should con- 
sider the lighting question. 

Jones Field 

The board received the deed to the Elnathan Jones Com- 
munity Field as voted at the annual town meeting. Mr. Eden 
Cahill was hired to care for the field and has charge of letting 
the field. The board made no charge for the use of the field. 
The board invites the advice of the citizens on the proper man- 
agement of this field for the benefit of the citizens of Acton. 

Work Relief 

The W. P. A. reconstructed parts of Nagog Hill Road by 
widening, gravelling, installing new culverts and rebuilding a 
bridge. The hurricane damage made it impossible to complete 
this road. We believe the town should favorably consider the 
continuation of W. P. A activities as long as a need for this work 
exists in Acton. 

Hurricane, Sept. 21, 1938 

The night of Wednesday, September 21, 1938 found practi- 
cally every street in town blocked by trees and poles. On Thurs- 
day morning every principal street was open to traffic due to 
the public spirited co-operation of many citizens of the town. 
The board expresses the appreciation of the town to those citi- 
zens who helped in any way during the emergency. 

The board spent all the Chapter 500 money on clearing the 



—19— 

town streets and estimate the cost at over $9,000 for the work 
|3erformed. 

We believe that an appropriation should be made to complete 
the W. P. A. project on trimming and removing shade trees 
damaged by the hurricane. 

Article 31 Highway Truck 

Your board encountered unforeseen obstacles that made it 
inadvisable to purchase a truck under the authority of the vote 
under this article The board is of the opinion that it would be 
a sound economical and efficient plan for the town to own and 
operate the regular highway equipment under proper conditions. 

Taxation and Economy 

We ask all departments of the town to operate as economically 
as possible for the year 1939, as the town faces an increased 
state tax and an appropriation for restoring the town to normal 
as a result of the hurricane damage. 

We ask all the citizens of the town to consider the problem 
of increased taxation by attending the annual town meeting and 
voting to keep the appropriations within the power of our citi- 
zens to pay. 

Your officials are governed by the action of your annual meet- 
ing in the administration of the affairs of the town. We ask 
your study of the services of the town that might be omitted 
in seeking to keep the tax rate at or below $30 per thousand. 

We wish to thank the different officers and committees of the 
town for doing their part in carrying out their work in the 
different departments of the Town. 

JAMES E. KINSLEY 
RAYMOND F. DURKEE 
RALPH W. PIPER 

Selectmen of Acton 



—20— 



Welfare Department Report 



During the year $7,671.77 was expended in aiding thirty-six 
families representing one hundred thirty-two persons in Acton. 
Of this amount, the town of Acton will be reimbursed approxi- 
mately $1,400 for cases having settlements in other cities and 
towns. There was $1,120.34 expended by other cities and towns 
on eight cases representing twenty-four presons having settle- 
ments in Acton. This makes a total of forty-four cases represent- 
ing one hundred fifty-six persons who were aided during the 
year. There were seventeen active cases representing seventy- 
two persons at the end of the year. 

During the latter part of 1937, we had a general recession in 
business which caused our Welfare load to increase tremen- 
dously, particularly during the winter months. This continued 
throughout the year 1938, which necessitated asking for an addi- 
tional appropriation of $2,500 at a special town meeting. This 
department is not going to ask for any increase of the various 
relief appropriations over that of last year. However, we cannot 
be assured that this will be sufficient to carry us through the 
year. With business still in an unsettled state and both Federal 
and State government advocating increased relief of all kinds, 
with the cities and towns assuming a larger share of the burden, 
it is impossible to predict what we will be faced with before the 
completion of the year 1939. 

In distributing the relief which comes under the supervision 
of this board, we have constantly kept in mind what this ex- 
penditure means as an added burden to our citizens. Yet, more 
important than this, we have had to keep in mind that our fel- 
low citizens, particularly the children, must not suffer, because 
of no fault of theirs, for want of the necessities of life. Evei^^ 
application for relief regardless of its type is treated individu- 
ally and investigated thoroughly, keeping in mind the laws gov- 
erning each case. 

Space will not permit going into detail. However, it can read- 
ily be seen the tremendous amount of work involved in the 



—21— 

supervision and distribution of relief. During the year, this 
board supervised the distribution of approximately $37,000. 
This was done at a cost to the town of Acton of $463.34 or 
approximately one and one-third per cent of the total amounit 
disbursed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN 
MARYM. LAFFIN 
RAYMOND L. HATCH 

Board of Public Welfare 



Old Age Assistance Report 



We started the year 1938 with seventy cases. During the 
year there were twenty-two cases added, making a total of 
ninety-two persons receiving Old Age Assistance in Acton. 
There were fourteen cases closed during the year leaving 
seventy-eight active cases on December 31, 1938. Eight cases 
having Acton settlements were aided in other cities and towns. 
There were sixteen cases aided in Acton having settlements in 
other cities and towns. $25,738.13 was disbursed by the Acton 
Bureau of Old Age Assistance to recipients during the? year. 
Taking into consideration the reimbursements to be received 
from Federal, State and other cities and towns, the total cost 
to the town of Acton for this assistance was approximately 
$3,900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Supervisor 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 



—22— 
Aid to Dependent Children Report 



On January 1, 1938, there were seven cases representing* 
nineteen persons receiving this aid. On December 31, 1938, there 
were five cases representing fifteen persons receiving this aid. 
During the year there v/as $2,143.50 expended; the cost ta the 
town of Acton being one-third or $714.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman 

Board of Public Welfare 



Department of Public Welfare 



Appropriations recommended for 1939. 

Old Age Assistance $14,000.00 

Temporary Aid . 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,800.00 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman 

Board of Public Welfare 



—23— 
Town Meetins^s 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 14, 1938 

Art. 1. To choose all necessary town officers and committees 
and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose Clara L- Sawyer trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund 
for three years. 

Chose Charles E. Smith trustee of the Goodnow Fund for 
three years. 

Chose Frederick T. Kennedy trustee of the Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Arnold H. Perkins trustee of the West Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one thousand 
dollars per annum and to allow an additional charge for expense 
of postage incurred in the collection of taxes. 

Voted: Under Art. 26. That the salary of the chairman of 
the Selectmen be three hundred dollars per annum and the other 
members two hundred dol'lars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Assessors be nine hundred 
dcllars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned as they 
may determine the said sum to include any salary of a clerk'^ 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board of Pub- 
lic Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars per annum 
and the other members seventy-five dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Heaith be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk fifteen dollars 
and the other member ten dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen dollars 
for the annual meeting and ten dollars for special meetings. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hundred 
dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 



—24— 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Accountant be four hun> 
dred dollars per annum. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Voted: That the reports of the several town officers be ac- 
cepted. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any committees 
chosen at any previous meeting that have not already reported. 

No action taken under this article. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will appropriate 
to defray the necessary and usual expenses of the seK^eral de- 
partments of the town and determine how the same shall be 
raised. 

Under this article and other articles in the warrant it was 
voted to appropriate and raise by taxation for: 

Roads, general maintenance $12,000.00 

Schools 47,000100 

Street Lighting • 3,500.00 

Memorial Library, current expenses 1,000.00 

Memorial Library, for books 200.00 

Hydrant Service 3,128.00 

General Government 6,300.00 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500.00 

Cemeteries 800.00 

Military Aid 200.00 

State Aid 800.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,500.00 

Police Department 2,500.00 

Board of Heald:h ., 1,500.00 

Public Welfare 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children , 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,000.00 

Snow Removal 3,600.00 

Care of Shade Trees 700.00 

Unclassified 40(i00 

Bonds, High School and Fire truck 5,500.00 

Interest on Bonds • 760.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 300.00 

/, 
.....J. 



^11i 



—25— 

Memorial Day . . 275.00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Gypsy Moth Work . 1,200.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.0^0 

Treasurer's, Collector's and Town Clerk's Bonds . . 236.00 

Public Health Nurse, salary 2,000,00 

Public Health Nurse, Expenses 200.00 

County Hospital, maintenapce 1,011.55 

County Hospital, alterations 1,543.30 

Fire Department, h,pse 550.00 

Dog Officer, expenses ..'... 200.00 

School Buildings, repairs 3,000.00 

Truck, Purchase of 1,200.00 

North Main Street, construction , 4,000.00 

Tax Title Redemption IQO.OO 

Memorial Library, Branch service 300.00 

Jones Athletic Field, maintenance 300.00 

Reserve Fund from overlay surplus 2,000.00 

Cemeteries transfer from Cemetery Land Fund . . 500.00 
Road Machinery Account transfer from Road 

Machinery Fund 520.00 

Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will raise for 
the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
and seventy-five dollars to be expended under the direction of 
a committee consisting of the Commander of the Isaac Davis 
Post, G.A.R., the Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
and the Finance Officer of Edwards-Quimby Post American 
Legion. 

Art. 6. To see what sum of money the town will raise and 
appropriate for the maintenance of the fire department or vote 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-eight 
hundred dollars. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix a price thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred dollars for fighting 



—26— 

brush fires and that the price for services and labor be fixed at 
fifty cents per hour for firemen, sixty cents per hour for Deputy 
Forest Warden and seventy-five cents per hour for the Forest 
Warden. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
to insure the em.ployees of the town or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of one thousand 
dollars. 

Art. 9. To see v/hat amount of money the town will appro- 
priate for the payment of premiums on the treasurer's and 
collector's bonds or act anything thereon. : 

Voted: To appropriate two hundred and thirty-six dollars 
for payment of premiums on treasurer's, tax collector's and town 
clerk's official bonds. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning Jan. 1, 1938 and to issue a note or notes there- 
for, payable within onei year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the town treasurer with the approval of the 
selectmen be and is hereby authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1938 and to- issue a note or notes therefor 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a public health 
nurse and appropriate a sum of money for the maintenance of 
same. 

Voted : To em.ploy a public health nurse to be under the direc- 
tion of the Board of Health and to appropriate two thousand 
dollars for the salary of said nurse and two hundred dollars for 
expenses. 

Art, 12. To see if the town will vote to accept Chapter 77, 



—27— 

Acts of 1937 ; an act providing for absent voting at regular town 
elections. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of fifteen hundred dollars more or less to drain and re- 
pair the road known as Central Street, in West. Acton, beginning 
at its intersection with Massachustts Avenue thence northerly 
to or near the residence of Millard J, Handley or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 14. To see what action the town will take tO' meet the 
assessment of $1,543.30 heretofore made on it for the purpose of 
paying its share of the cost of making alterations and construct- 
ing additions in and to the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital under Chapter 417 of the Acts of 1935, as amended by 
Chapter 205 of the Acts of 1937 ; to see whether the town will 
vote to appropriate all or any portion of said assessment and to 
raise the amount so appropriated in whole or in part in this 
year's tax levy or to transfer such amount in whole of ivs r;at. 
from any available funds ; to see whether the town will vote 'to 
appropriate all or any portion of said assessment and to borrow 
the amount so appropriated on bonds or notes of the town; to 
see whether the town will elect that all or any portion of se^d 
assessment shall be funded through the issue of bonds or notes 
of the County of Middlesex as authorized by said Chapter 417, 
as amended; in case the town shall elect to fund under said 
Chapter 417, to see whether the town will elect that the assess- 
ments to be hereafter made upon it on account of any such 
funding loan shall be payable by it over the maximum permitted 
term of fifteen years or over a lesser period ; to see whether the 
town will vote to direct the Town Clerk to file with the Middle- 
sex County Commissioners promptly, and in any event not later 
than April 15, 1938, an election to fund all or any portion of the 
assessment already made upon it as aforesaid; and to take 
action in connection with the matters contained in this article. 

Voted: To appropriate and raise by taxation the current 
year the sum of $1,543.30 to meet the assessment made on the 
town for the purpose mentioned in this article. 



—28— 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, from the 
Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton ; said money to be 
used in conjunction with any money that may be allotted by the 
State or County or both for this purpose or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Voted: That the town raise and appropriate the sum of 
four thousand dollars for the continuation of the improvement 
of Main Street from the Carlisle line to the State Road, East 
Acton; said sum or any portion thereof to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or County 
or both for this purpose. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of two hundred dollars for the use of the treasurer to 
pay the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be re- 
imbursed for the amount spent, by the County of Middlesex or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
dollars. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the specific repairs and widenings of School 
Street, South Acton, said money to be used in conjunction with 
any money which may be allotted by the State or County or both 
for this purpose or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Ai't. 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of fourteen hundred dollars or any other sum for the sup- 
pression of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of twelve hundred 
dollars. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of twelve hundred dollars or any other sum for the care 
of shade trees or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of seven hundred 
dollars ; five hundred dollars for the care of trees and two hun- 
dred dollars for new planting of trees. 



—29— 

Art. 20. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
for Work Relief or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of one hundred dollars for the redemption of tax titles held by 
the town. 

Voted: To appropriate one hundred dollars for the redemp- 
tion of tax titles. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, 
the town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, ai^d 
repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as as- 
sessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the 
General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25G. (6) (a) of the 
Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of ten hundred 
eleven and 55/100 (1,011.55) dollars. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of five hundred and fifty (550) dollars or any other sum 
to purchase new fire hose. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of five hundred 
and fifty dollars. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to repair the Acton Center fire house or vote 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to repair the South Acton fire house or vote anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To pass over this article. 

Art. 26. To see if the Town will vote to increase the salaries 
paid to the members of the Board of Selectmen to the following 
figures: the chairman $300, the other members $200 a year. 
To do and act thereon. 

Action recorded under Article 1. 



—so- 
Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to investigate all cases presented by property 
owners who claim to have been exempt from two thousand 
dollars of taxation on their property during the years 1936 and 
1937, under the provisions of paragraph 17, section 5, of Chapter 
59 of the General Laws; and to authorize the refund, on order 
of the Board, of such exempt taxes to those who have paid their 
tax bills; and' to pay the tax collector, (without commission), if 
those tax bills have not been paid by the recipients, in all cases 
where the exemption is clearly shown ; to do or act thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
or act anything thereon to put in a catch basin or suitable drain 
to take care of the water flowing down off the hill from the 
Curley place opposite the residence of E. S. Cooper on Arlington 
Street in West Acton. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 29- To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money sufficient to provide proper police protection at 
Quimby Square, South Acton, after the noon and afternoon dis- 
missals of the South Acton Elementary School. 

A motion to raise and appropriate the sum of $180 did not 
prevail. 

Art. 30. To see what money the town will appropriate for 
necessary repair of school buildings. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of three thousand 
dollars for the repair of school buildings. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
to purchase one or more trucks for the Street Department or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate twelve hundred (1200) dollars to pur- 
chase a truck for the Street Department. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the repair of Nagog Hill Road or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will vote to expend a sum not to 



—31— 

exceed $100. for the ptirpose of having appraised the town build- 
ings and their contents, submitting same to the Massachusetts 
Rating and Inspection Bureau so that a blanket insurance rate 
may be established or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 34. To see if the town will vote to accept the gift of the 
Jones Community Field at South Acton as an athletic field and 
maintain the same or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the Town of Acton accept a deed of gift from 
the trustees of the Elnathan Jones Community Field, of a parcel 
of land situated in that part of Acton called South Acton, bound- 
ed southeasterly by Stow Street, southwesterly by Martin Street 
and northeasterly by the brook said land being known as the 
Elnathan Jones Community Field and appropriate the sum of 
S300 for the maintenance and care thereof the current year. 

Art. 35. To see if the town will appropriate $800 or any 
other sum, to provide for the transportation and circulation of 
books of the Memorial Library, for South and West Acton to be 
expended under the direction of the library trustees. 

Voted: That the town appropriate $300 to provide for the 
transportation and circulation of books of the Memorial Library 
for South and West Acton to be expended under the direction 
of the library trustees. 

Art. 36. To see if the town will vote to adopt the following- 
Proposed Zoning Laws or act anything thereon. 

The proposed by-laws are recorded under Art. 36 in the record 
of the warrant for the annual meeting March 14, 1938. 

A motion that the town adopt the proposed By-Laws and that 
the selectmen be authorized to appoint a Board of Appeal in 
accordance with by-laws, did not prevail. 

The Moderator ordered a hand vote and declared the result as 
follows : 

Voting yes 94 

Voting no 122 



—32— 

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Special Meeting Held 

August 1, 1938. 



Art. 1. To see if the town will raise and appropriate ten 
thousand (10,000) dollars for the Work Relief Fund by borrow- 
ing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of IdijS or transfer from avail- 
able funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, to raise and appropriate (10,000) ten 
thousand dollars for the Work Relief Fund by transferring 
thirty-five hundred (3500) dollars from the overlay surplus 
account and by transferring sixty-five hundred (6,500) dollars 
from the surplus revenue account, the appropriation to be ex- 
pended in 1938 and 1939. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the use of the Welfare Department 
by borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer 
from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, to raise and appropriate twenty-five 
hundred (2,500) dollars by transferring said amount from the 
overlay surplus account for the use of the Welfare Department 
for the remainder of the current year. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the use of the Soldiers' Relief De- 
partment by borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 
or transfer from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, to raise and appropriate for the use 
of the Soldiers' Relief Department one thousand (1,000) dollars 
by transferring said amount from the overlay surplus account. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of financing the construction 
of a consolidated elementary school in the vicinity of Kelley's 
Corner and authorize and direct the selectmen to accept on be- 
half of the town an offer of the United States of America to 
aid in financing the construction of said project by making a 
grant of money to the town, and authorize a building committee 
to construct said project and contract with respect thereto and 
authorize the treasurer with the approval of the selectmen to 
borrow such sums as may be necessary to meet any appropria- 
tion made or take any action relative thereto. 



—33— 

The following- motion was made and seconded : 

Moved: For the purpose of constructing a consolidated ele- 
mentary school and to enable the town to secure the benefits 
of funds granted by the Federal Government under the Public 
Works Administration Appropriation Act of 1938, there be 
raised and appropriated the sum of $105,000.00 and the treas- 
urer, with the approval of the selectmen, be and hereby is au- 
thorized to borrow the sum of $60,000.00 and to issue bonds or 
notes of the town therefor, under authority of and in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 50 of the Acts of 1938, said bonds 
or notes to be payable in not more than 20 years at such term 
and maximum rate of interest as may be fixed by the Emer- 
gency Finance Board. 

All moneys received by way of grant from the Federal Gov- 
ernment on account of this project shall be applied first to meet 
the cost of construction thereof and any balance shall be applied 
to the payment of the loan herein authorized. 

The selectmen or Building Committee are hereby authorized 
and directed to accept on behalf of the town, for use in carrying 
out such project, a Federal grant of money, pursuant to the Pub- 
lic Works Administration Appropriation Act of 1938; and the 
Building Committee is authorized to proceed with the construc- 
tion of said project and to enter into all necessary and proper 
contracts and agreements in respect thereto, all subject to ap- 
plicable Federal regulations; and the selectmen and the Building 
Committee are authorized to do all other acts and things neces- 
sary or convenient for obtaining said grant, making said loan, 
and constructing said project. 

It was voted, to vote on the motion by ballot. The Moderator 
appointed Elwyn Hollowell, Edward Bursaw, Raymond Gallant 
and W. Henry Soar to act as tellers, to receive and count the 
ballots. 

The Moderator declared the vote as follows: 

Total number of ballots cast 338 

Necessary two-thirds 226 

Yes 167 

No 168 

Blanks 3 



—34-^ 



Record of State Election^ November 8, 1938 



S. L. P. — Socialist Labor Party 

I .—Independent 

S. — Socialist 

D. — Democratic 

I. T. — ^Independent Tax Reform 

Whole number of ballots cast 



C . — Communist 

S.S.G.— -Sound Sensible Government 

T. R. P. — ^Townsend Recovery Plan 

R. — ^Republican 

P. — ^Prohibition 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Total 

405 495 468 1368 



GOVERNOR 








Henning A. Blomen, S.L.P. 














Roland S- Bruneau, I. 














Jeffrey W. Campbell, S. 





1 





1 


James M. Curley, D. 


42 


102 


77 


221 


William A. Davenport, I.T. 








1 


1 


Otis Archer Hood, C. 














Charles L. Manser, S.S.G. 








c/ 





William H. McMasters, T.R.P. 


1 


3 


1 


5 


Leverett Saltonstall, R. 


358 


385 


379 


1122 


George L. Thompson, P. 














Blanks 


4 . 


4 


10 


18 


LIEUT. GOVERNOR 








Manuel Blank, C. 


1 








1 


James Henry Brennan, D. 


35 


94 


74 


203 


Horace T. Cahill, R. 


359 


386 


380 


1125 


Freeman W. Follett, P. 


5 


3 





8 


Joseph E. Massidda, S, 





2 





2 


George L. McGlynn, S.L.P. 














Blanks 


5 


10 


14 


29 


SECRETARY 








Frederick W. Cook, R. 


360 


387 


394 


1141 


Hugo De Gregory, C. 














Katharine A. Foley, D. 


35 


95 


64 


194 


Eileen 0' Connor Lane, S. 


1 


6 





7 


Malcolm T. Rowe, S.L.P. 





1 


Q) 


1 


Blanks 


9 


6 


10 


25 



—35— 
TREASURER 



Frank L. Asher, C. 





10 





10 


illbert Sprague Coolidge, S. 





9 


2 


11 


Owen Gallagher, D. 


38 


106 


58 


202 


John J. Hurley, I. 


4 


5 


6 


15 


William E. Hurley, R. 


354 


314 


389 


1057 


Ralph Pirone, S.L.P. 





38 





38 


Blanks 


9 


13 


13 


35 


AUDITOR 








Thomas H. Buckley, D. 


41 


104 


81 


226 


Michael C. Flaherty, S. 


0^ 


1 





1 


Horace I. Hillis, S.L.P. 





1 





1 


Michael Tuysuzian, C. 














Guy S. Williams, P. 


2 


3 


2 


7 


Russell A. Wood, R. 


349 


367 


366 


1082 


Blanks 


13 


19 


19 


51 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






Clarence A. Barnes, R. 


326 


334 


327 


987 


Paul A. Dever, D. 


58 


138 


126 


322 


Joseph C. Figueiredo, C. 








1 


1 


George F. Hogan, P. 


1 


2 





3 


Alfred Baker Lewis, S. 





1 





1 


Fred E. Oelcher, S.L.P. 


1 


1 





2 


Blanks 


19 


19 


14 


52 


CONGRESSMAN- 


Fifth District 






Francis J. Roane, D. 


25 


70 


49 


144 


Edith Nourse Rogers, R. 


367 


412 


407 


1186 


Blanks 


13 


13 


12 


38 


COUNCILLOR 


-Third District 






Frank A. Brooks, R. 


355 


381 


379 


1115 


George L. Paine, S. 


1 


18 





19 


Francis J. Roche, D. 


32 


71 


66 


169 


Blanks 


17 


25 


23 


65 


SENATOR Fifth Middlesex 






Louis B. Connors, D. 


59 


125 


130 


314 


George G. Moyse, R. 


324 


348 


319 


991 


Blanks 


22 


22 


19 


63 



— 36 — ' 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eleventh Middlesex 

David T. Kinsley, D. 82 119 195 3% 

John H. Valentine, R. 309 361 267 937 

Blanks 14 15 6 35 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY— Northern District 

Robert F. Bradford, R. 356 389 390 1135 

Joseph V. Carroll, D. 39 88 62 189 

Blanks 10 18 16 44 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Thomas B. Brennan, D. 39 103 84 226 

Sylvester J. McBride, S. 12 2 5 

Charles C. Warren, R. 349 362 359 1070 

Blanks 16 28 23 67. 

SHERIFF 

Ohver W. Anderson, S. 14 16 

Michael J. Dea, D. 39 78 65 182 

Herbert Harris, I. 3 2 4 9 

Joseph M. McElroy, R. 350 394 380 1124' 

Blanks 12 17 18 47 

CLERK OF COURTS 

Edward L. Ford, D. 41 96 76 213 

Frederic L. Putnam,R. 350 370 368 1088 

Blanks 14 29 24 67 

Question No. 1 — Binnial Sessions 

Yes 173 201 201 575 

No 99 111 150 360 

Blanks ' 133 183 117 433 

Question No. 2 — Taxicab Stands 

Yes 109 142 132 383 

No 163 173 203 539 

Blanks 133 180 133 



Licenses for Sale of Liquors 
1. All Alcoholic Beverages 

Yes 151 226 144 521 

No 19a 179 283 652 

Blanks 64 90 41 195 



—37- 



2. Wines and Beer 



Yes 


195 


270 


214 


679 


No 


154 


139 


217 


510 


Blanks 


56 


86 


37 


179 


3. All Beverages in Packages 










Yes 


175 


250 


184 


609 


No 


158 


159 


236 


553 


Blanks 


72 


86 


48 


206 


Pari-Mutuel Betting on Horses 










Yes 


183 


201 


185 


569 


No 


127 


197 


203 


527 


Blanks 


95 


97 


80 


272 


Pari-Mutuel Betting on Dogs 










Yes 


157 


181 


153 


491 


No 


154 


209 


229 


592 


Blanks 


94 


105 


86 


285 



Schedule of votes cast for a Representative in the General 
Court from the 11th Middlesex Representative District, No- 
vember 8, 1938: 

Acton Bedford Carlisle Chelmsford Littleton Westford Totals 



David T. E^nsley 
















of Acton 


. 396 


247 


51 


658 


116 


455 


1923 


John H. Valentine 
















of Chelmsford 


. 937 


673 


254 


2581 


592 


877 


5914 


Blanks 


. 35 


88 


31 


140 


38 


74 


406 



1368 1008 336 3379 746 1406 8243 

A true record attest : 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk 



Proceedings of a Special Town. Meeting Held November 21, 1938 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to accept an Act to au-» 
thorize the placing of the office of Chief of Police of the Town 
of Acton under the civil service laws as provided in Chapter 493 
of the Acts of 1938, viz: (Chapter 493) An Adt to authorize 
the placing of the office of Chief of Police of the Town of Acton 
under the Civil Service laws. 



—38— 

Be it enacted, etc. as follows: 

Section 1. The office of Chief of Police of the Town of Acton 
shall, upon the effective date of this act, become subject to the 
civil service laws and rules and regulations relating to police 
officers in towns, and the tenure of office of any incumbent of 
said office shall be unlimited, subject, however, to such laws, 
but the present incumbent of said office may conitinue to serve 
therein without taking a civil service examination. 

Section 2. This act shall take full effect upon its acceptance 
by vote of the inhabitants of said town at a special town meet- 
ing held during the current year, but not otherwise. 

A motion was made and seconded that the Act be accepted. 

Voted: Unanimously that the vote on the question be taken 
by ballot. 

The following persons were appointed and sworn by the 
Moderator to act as tellers 

Henry Engman Theron A. Lowden 

Arthur W. Lee 

The Moderator declared the vote as follows: 

Total number of ballots cast 486 

Voting Yes 360 

Voting No 125 

Blanks 1 

Art. 2. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of six 
hundred (600) dollars from the Cemetery Land Fund, to be 
equally divided between Mt. Hope and Woodlawn cemeteries, 
for the purpose of clearing up and repairing storm damage. 

Voted : To appropriate six hundrd dollars from the Cemetery 
Land Fund for clearing up and repairing storm damage^ to be 
apportioned equally between Mt. Hope and Woodlawn cemeteries. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to transfer one hundred 
(100) dollars from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Ac- 
count. 

Voted: To transfer one hundred dollars from the Machinerv^ 
Fund to the Machinery Account. 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 

Whole number recorded 42 

Born in Acton 6 Native parentage 34 

Males 23 Foreign parentage — 

Females 19 Mixed parentage 8 



Marriages 

Whole number recorded 30 

Residents of Acton .... 34 Residents of other places 26 



Deaths 

Whole number recorded 53 

Residents of Acton .... 50 Residents of other places 3 

Occurring in Acton .... 38 Occurring in other places 15 

Average Age in Years 65 -|- 



— 40— 



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Deaths Registered in 1938 



Date 




Name 


■ 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Dys. 


Mar. 


31 


Boyce, Charles E. 




74 


9 


26 


Mar. 


21 


Bragdon, Hannah G. 


(Stearns) 


79 




11 


July 


7 


Brown, James Perry 




87 


2 


21 


Jan. 


3 


Gaboon, Jean 






9 




Feb. 


28 


Gase, John E. 




81 


3 


1 


June 


18 


Ghaffin, Myron Lewis 




85 


3 


18 


Sept. 


2 


Ghaplin, Herman 




90 


4 


13 


Nov. 


11 


Glarke, Gatherine G. 




53 


10 


4 


Aug. 


29 


Glark, Charles L. 




71 


6 


25 


Feb. 


5 


Coolidge, Hattie May 




54 


4 


29 


Feb. 


10^ 


Conant, Abbie F. 




90 


1 


18 


May 


16 


Darling, Silas 




70 


5 


20 


July 


2 


Davis, Elizabeth Bishop 


90 


6 


13 


July 


8 


Dunlap, Chester 1. 




29 


5 


17 


Feb. 


22 


Durkee, Charles A. 




69 


1 


16 


Aug. 


15 


Edney, Cora Esther 




62 


1 


8 


Nov. 


24 


Fairbanks, Nellie L. 




82 


8 


13 


Sept. 


16 


Fletcher, Aaron J. 




97 


4 


19 


Sept. 


7 


Fletcher, Jonathan P. 




89 


8 


26 


Nov. 


27 


Fobes, Edward S. 




76 




2 


April 


17 


Fogg, Emma A. (Priest) 


59 




21 


Feb. 


24 


Harris, Hattie Adele 




71 


8 




Dec. 


4 


Hazel, Mary Durgin 




78 


11 


9 


May 


7 


Hoffman, Elizabeth A 


• 


75 


2 


7 


Oct. 


18 


Holton, George E. 




71 


9 


15 


Sept. 


7 


Houghton, Oliver Ellsworth 


76 


9 


13 


Mar. 


19 


Janvrin, Gatherine M. 


(Connelley) 


64 


11 


19 


Mar. 


13 


Johnson, William 




61 


11 


n 

i 


Mar. 


1 


Jones, Warren Henry 




72 


7 


14 


Mar. 


14 


Lawrence, Lendall Aurelius 


89 


9 


16 


Feb. 


21 


Lockwood, 








4 


April 


5 


Manion, Charlotte E. 




59 


1 


22 


Feb. 


6 


Morse, Edna M. 




80 


8 


25 


Nov. 


2 


Nealey, Edward F. 




67 


3 


2 


Aug. 


30 


Newton, Virginia M. (Roche) 


24 


1 


25 


Sept. 


13 


Noyes, George L. 




70 


10 





Date 




Name 


Yfs. 


Mos. 


Dys. 


Feb. 


14 


Noterman, Celina 


47 


7 


4 


April 


30 


Pratt, Edward F. 


73 


7 


29 


April 


22 


Reed, Mildred M. 


44 


3 


22 


April 


19 


Reynolds, Arthur 


1 


4 


24 


Oct. 


1 


Richardson, Mary L. (Peck) 


55 


11 


23 


May 


2 


Roberts 






4hr. 


Dec. 


3 


Richardson, Elizabeth B. 


80i 


4 


4 


Sept. 


22 


Schofield, Anthony Kimball 


63 


9 


5 


July 


3 


Sheehan, Catherine Anastasia 


42 


6 


13 


April 


20 


Shepherd, Beaumont 


78 






April 


11 


Stanley, Edward Z. 


83 






June 


19 


Tasker, Frank E. 


74 


6 


6 


Oct. 


15 


Taylor, Silas Hammond 


91 


6 


20 


Nov. 


14 


Twitchell, Martha M. 


86 


10 


15 


June 


18 


Washburn, Ella S. 


66 


10 


13 


July 


30 


Watt, Ernest 


54 


3 


9 


July 


7 


Whitcomb, Fred Stanley 


71 




25 



—47— 



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List of Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1938 



Allen, H. V $2.00 

Allen, W. Stuart 2.00 

Alley, Mrs. Ruth 2.00 

Anderson, Carl E 2.00 

Anderson, Hilda 5.00 

Bacher, Helen . 2.00 

Baker, Mrs. J. W. ..... 2.00 

Bancroft, Clesson A. . . 10.00 

Barry, David A 2.00 

Barteaux, M. W 2.00 

Bean, Mrs. Lucy 5.00 

Bean, Priscilla 5.00 

Bedford, Mrs. A. E. ... 2.00 

Bell George 2.00 

Benere, Antonia M 5.00 

Billings, Howard J 2.00 

Birch, Alfred 2.00 

Blanchard, Hazel G. . . . 2.00 

Bond, Arthur M 2.00 

Bondelevitch, Walter . . 4.00 

Bowen, Robert M 4.00 

Bowman, Herbert E. . . 2.00 

Bradbury, Rolfe 2.00 

Bradley, John J 5.00 

Bradley, William . . 2.00 

Braman, Dorothy 5.00 

Braman, Frank S 2.00 

Braman, George A. . . . 2.00 

Brill, Fred E 2.00 

Brown, Robert 2.00 

Buckley, John P 5.00 

Bursaw, Henry E. .... 2.00 

Butler, Mary K 2.00 

Cahill, William 2.00 

Caldwell, Hazel 2.00 

Caldwell, Margaret . . . 2.00 

Carey, Lester 5.00 



Carlson, Cliristian .... 2.00 

Carvelo, Manuel 2.00 

Cavanagh, W. H 2.00 

Chaffin, Nancy S 2.00 

Charles, Will A 2.00 

Charter, William 2.00 

Christofferson, Allen . . 2.00 

Christofferson, Edwin . 2.00 

Clark, O. L 2.00 

Clifford, Florence H. . . . 2.00 

Cloutier, Joseph 2.00 

Collins, Francis 5.00 

Conant, Charlotte 2.00 

Condon, Katherine M. . 2.00 

Conquest, William 2.00 

Costello, Timothy 2.00 

Coughlin, John F. 5.00 

Coughlin, Mary 2.00 

Cram, Ralph W 2.00 

Creeley, Genevieve J. . 2.00 

Crosby, W. C 5.00 

Culbert, George ....... 5.00 

Cullinane, C. C. ....... 2.00 

Cunningham, Harold J.. 2.00 

Curtis, Clinton S 4.00 

Davis, Charles E 7.00 

Davis, Edith (Pine 

Ledge Kennel) 25.00 

Davis, Warren A. & Son 5.00 

Davis, Warren J 5.00 

Davis, Wendell F 2.00 

Day, Harold E 2.00 

Decrow, Frank 2.00 

Derby, Benjamin 2.00 

DeSousa, Joseph 2.00 

Donnelly, Lawrence . . . 2.00 

Downey, Chester M. . . . 5.00 



—50— 



Duggan, John J 2.00 

Durkee, Mabel C 2.00 

Durkee, Raymond F. . . . 2.00 

Durkee, Sidney P 2.00 

Edney, Charles F 2.00 

Engman, J. Henry .... 2.00 

Enneguess, Michael . . . 2.00 

Espie, James E 2.00 

Evans, John H 2.00 

Farley, Charles J 7.00 

Farquhar, Stuart 4.00 

Farrar, James A 2.00 

Ferguson, Robert C. . . . 2.00 

Fisher, Charles W 5.00 

Flerra, Louis 5.00 

Fletcher, John 4.00 

Flint, Buddy 2.00 

Flint, Margery S 5.00 

Forbes, Edward L. . . . 2.00 
Eraser, Arthur (Kennel) 50.00 

Frazier, Robert A 2.00 

Freeman, George 2.00 

French, James H 2.00 

Fullonton, Llewllyn . . . 2.00 

Gagnon, Ida 2.00 

Gagnon, John 5.00 

Gallagher, Margaret . . . 2.00 

Gallagher, Thomas C. . . 2.00 

Gallant, Mildred 2.00 

Gallant, Raymond 2.00 

Gatchell, Herman H. . . . 4.00 

Gibbs, Harry F 5.00 

Godfrey, Carl N 2.00 

Goodrich, Howard 2.00 

Goward, Hannah C. . . . 5.00 

Gray, Charles E 2.00 

Haas, Henry C 2.00 

Hall, Robert C . 2.00 

Hall, Walter F 2.00 

Harris, A. Leslie 2.00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 



Harrison, Agnes J. . . . 2.00 

Hart, Nelson J 2.00 

Harvey, W. Burton 2.00 

Hatch, Raymond L. . . . 2.00 

Hayes, F. C 2.00 

Hayes, Michael G 4.00 

Haynes, Henry L 2.00 

Heuss, Frederick H. . . . 2.00 

Hickey, Henry 5.00 

Hodgen, Hugh 2.00 

Holden, Frank H 2.00 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Holland, Hope C 2.00 

Holland, Neville R 2.00 

Hollowell, Elwin 2.00 

Hollowell, Norman E. . . 5.00 

Holt, Walter W 2.00 

Howard, Vivian D 2.00 

Howe, Oscar 2.00 

Hubbard, David M 5.00 

Hurley, John W 2.00 

Jalonen, Arthur 9.00 

Jenks, Albert R 4.00 

Jensen, Albert 2.00 

Jensen, Peter 4.00 

Johnson, Albion 2.00 

Johnson, Mary 2.00 

Jones, Blanche 5.00 

Jones, Howard L 4.00 

Jones, Karl R 2.00 

Jules, Alfred B 2.00 

Kazokas, Cypras 6.00 

Kazokas, William 5.00 

Kelley, Chester E 2.00 

Kilmartin, William T. . 9.00 

Kimball, Elnathan .... 6.00 

Kulberg, Harry 5.00 

Laffin, Ormal S. R 10.00 

Lane, Patricia R 2.00 

LaRoche, Arthur 2.00 

Larrabee, George W. . . 5.00 



—51— 



Leavitt, Arnold B. . . 2.00 

LeClerc, Edward . 2.00 

Liebf ried, Walter ..... 5.00 

Liese, Blanche 5.00 

Litchard, Lucy B 4.00 

Livermore, Pearl R. ... 2.00 

Livermore, Roland .... 10.00 

Lockwood, Ralph H. . . . 2.00 

Logan, George W 5.00 

Lothrop, Mary H. ..... 5.00 

Love, Gordon G 2.00 

Lowden, Richard 2.00 

MacGregor, H. Stuart . 2.00 

MacKinnon, Foster R. . 2.00 

Mahoney, James 4.00 

Marshall, W. L., Jr. . . . 4.00 

Mason, Roger 4.00 

Massie, W. A 2.00 

Mauro, Frank 2.00 

Maynes, Everett M. . , . 2.00 

McCarthy, Leo 2.00 

McKelvie, Arthur 2.00 

Mead, Mrs. Hobart E. . 2.00 

Mel, Eleanor 2.00 

Merriam, Harold 2.00 

Middleton, Willis J. . . . 7.00 

Milbery, Olive 2.00 

Mills, Myra Zeta 2.00 

Montague, Everett N. . 2.00 

Moody, Allen G 2.00 

Moore, Mildred Pope . . 4.00 

Murgatroyd, James ... 5.00 

Murray, John 2.00 

Nealey, Mrs. E. F 2.00 

Nichols, Orla 2.00 

Noterman, Emile, Jr. . . 5.00 

Nugent, Joseph 2.00 

Oliver, Hazel W 2.00 

Olsen, Peter 5.00 

Ouellette, Ernest 2.00 

Parks, Milton G 2.00 



Parsons, Elsie F 2.00 

Parsons, Mrs. Norman . 7.00 

Pederson, John 7.00 

Penney, D. F 2.00 

Penney, Mary 5.00 

Penney, Raymond 2.00 

Perkins, A. Hazelton . . 2.00 

Perkins, LaForest ..... 2.00 

Perry, Tony 2.00 

Peterson, Edwin ...... 2.00 

Peterson, Ruth 7.00 

Peterson, William S. . . . 2.00 

Pierce, Isabel F 9.00 

Piper, Alvin R 2.00 

Powers, Clyde R 2.00 

Pratt, Herbert T 2.00 

Putnam, F. Wendell . . . 7.00 

Rawitser, Louis 2.00 

Rawitser, William .... 2.00 

Raymond, George J. . . . 7.00 

Reed, George H 2.00 

Reed, G. Howard 7.00 

Reed, Otis 7.00 

Reid, Robert A. 3rd . ... 2.00 

Reynolds, Mrs. Arthur . 2.00 

Rimbach, Frederick . . . 2.00 

Robbins, Mildred H. . 5.00 

Robblee, Harry 2.00 

Roche, Beaven 2.00 

Roche, Frank B 2.00 

Roche, Norman 2.00 

Roe, George 2.00 

Rugg, George 2.00 

Sargent, Everett E. ... 7.00 

Sawyer, Benjamin .... 2.00 

Scanlon, Ruth H 2.00 

Scribner, Harry V. .... 2.00 

Sebastian, Lester A. . . . 2.00 

Shapley, Eva C 2.00 

Sharek, Lucretia 5.00 

Sheridan, Eleanor .... 2.00 



52— 



Simeone, Luigi 4.00 

Smith, Ralph I. . . . 2.00 

Soar, Wm. Henry 2.00 

Spinney, Marion 2.00 

Starck, Cecil 2.00 

Stevens, John N 2.00 

Stevens, Walter B 2.00 

Stoney, Reginald 2.00 

Stuart, Leslie E 2.00 

Sweeney, Daniel 2.00 

Sweet, Charles Craig . . 2.00 

Tabbi, Salvatore 5.00 

Tasker, Frank E 2.00 

Taylor, Charles P 2.00 

Taylor, Lillian E 2.00 

Tajdor, Paul 2.00 

Taylor, Simon D 2.00 

Taylor, Spencer H 2.00 

Thompkins, Elizabeth . 5.00 

Todd, Ethel L. ....... 18.00 

253 licenses at $2.00 . 

67 licenses at 5.00 . 

1 license at 25.00 . 

1 license at 50.00 . 



Deduct fees 322 at 20 cents 



Paid to Town Treasurer 



Tolman, Wilbur J. ..... 5.00 

Towne, Roger P 2.00 

Tracey, Alfred H 2.00 

Tupper, Arthur 5.00 

Tuttle, Horace F 2.00 

Tuttle, Osgood 5.00 

Tuttle, William D. Jr. . . 2.00 

Veasie, Stanley R 2.00 

Vose, Charles E 2.00 

Wait, Albert 2.00 

Waite, Frederick A. . . . 7.00 

Walther, Francis A. . . . 2.00 

Waluk, John 2.00 

Wayne, J. Arthur 2.00 

White, George 2.00 

Willett, Fred W 2.00 

Wise, Glenna 2.00 

Wood, Oliver 2.00 

Woodworth, Jason .... 2.00 



$506.00 

335.00 

25.00 

50.00 



$916.00 
64.40 



$851.60 



NOTICE 



All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the o^\Tiers or 
keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, regai'dless 
of time of year ownership is acquired. 

No tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Towai Clerk. 



-- ■■' O O 



Jury List Revised — 1938 



Frank S. Rogers 
Oliver D. Wood 
Charles E. Willett 
W. Stuart Allen 



Precinct 1 

Harlan E. Tuttle 
Ray L. Harris 
John Pederson 
Frank W. Putnam, Jr. 
Murray Brown 



John Enneguess 
Reg'inald Stoney 
Daniel W. Sheehan 
John Anderson 



Precinct 2 

Edwin Christofferson 
Carl E. Anderson 
Frank Penney 
William Driscoll 
Charles Capelle 



Leland H. Campbell 
John E. Beach 
Arthur Lee 
Raymond Gallant 



Precinct 3 



William Davis 
Waldo E. Whitcomb 
James E. Kinsley 
Havelock J. Schnair 



Edward J. Bursaw 



~54— 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 
For the Year 1938 



We have decided to discontinue the printing in the annual 
town report of the schedule of income and expenditures on ac- 
count of the funds deposited with the town for the perpetual 
care of lots. 

We shall, however, continue to keep an annual account with 
each fund in permanent record books which may be examined 
by any person interested. Owing to the low rates of interest, 
the income from a deposit of one hundred dollars is insufficient 
to meet the present cost of the care given, and the deficiency 
has been made up from the surplus earnings of previous years. 

A detailed account of the appropriations and expenditures 
for the care of cemeteries and the income and expenditures on 
account of invested funds will be found in the reports of the 
town treasurer and town accountant. 

During the year the Chapel provided for under the will of 
Mrs. Georgia E. Whitney was completed and presented to the 
town with an appropriate dedicatory service, we include a copy 
of the program in this report. 

The free use of the Chapel is offered, for the observance of 
burial rites, to all citizens of the town and non-residenti burials 
in Acton. 

The cemeteries suffered severe loss in the September Hurri- 
cane by the uprooting of many beautiful old trees. 

At Woodlawn a beginning has been made to develop new 
burial ground near the Chapel and prepare the way for future 
improvements. 

We invite all who are interested in the care of our cemeteries 
to contribute according to their ability towards the care of their 
lots that the standard of care which has been given in the past 
may be continued. 

WENDELL F. DAVIS, 
FRED W. GREEN, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



— 55 — 

Police Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report for the Police Department for 
the year of 1938. 

Arrests and prosecutions made on the following complaints: 

Assault 3 

Manslaughter . 2 

B & E & Larceny , 3 

Larceny 1 

Drunkenness 7 

Operating under the influence 4 

Operating so as to endanger 7 

Other violations of Motor Vehicle Laws 13 

Non-support 2 

Non-payment of fine 1 

Placing obstructions on tracks 1 

Delinquent Child 1 

Motor Vehicle Accidents : 

Number of accidents reported 44 

Number of persons injured in accidents ,35 

Number of persons killed in accidents . 2 

Conclusion: 

May I take this opportunity to express my sincere apprecia- 
tion to the officers of this department, the State Poljice, the 
Chiefs of neighboring Towns and my friends of Acton for their 
splendid co-operation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



— 56 — 
Report of Inspector of Animals 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for the 
year 1938. 

Cows 403 

Young Cattle 85 

Bulls 18 

Swine 708 

Sheep 15 

Goats 17 

Quarantined Dogs 11 

Rabies None 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



Report of Dog Officer 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report, as Dog Officer, covering work 
done for the year 1938: 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law .... 49 
Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance with 

law 5 

Total number of dogs handled 54 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 29 

Warnings to delinquent dog owners to get licenses 79 

Appropriation $200.00 

49 dogs at $3.00 for six days' board 147.00 

49 dogs at $1.0Q for disposai . 49.00 



Total for board and disposal . $196.00 

Gentlemen : 

I therefore, recommend that the appropriation for the year 
1939 be $225.00, 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dog Officer. 



—57— 
W. p. A. Work Relief — Hurricane Report 



Approximately 284 stumps were removed to the town dump 
and covered. Also three stump holes were filled. The wood was 
carried to the Welfare pit and brush carried to the town dump. 
Some brush was burned beside the road. Sidewalks were re- 
placed. 

Stumps were removed from the school grounds and holes 
filled. Also fifty other trees cut down and removed, and danger- 
ous hangers were removed from other trees. 

FIRE HAZARD PROJECT 

Approximately one hundred men have been working on the 
fire hazard project cutting and burning pine slash 50 feet from 
the highways, clearing out old wood roads to be used for fire 
lanes. Also clearing 50 feet from wood roads and clearing 300 
feet around buildings. If this work continues, it is expected to 
have all town roads and wood roads cleared for a distance of 
300 feet. 

At the present time work has been done in the following sec- 
tions : Fort Fond area, Hammond Street, Newtown Road, Arling- 
ton Street, Piper Road, School Street and comer of School and 

Parker Streets. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Sponsor's Foreman. 



—58— 
Report of Superintendent of Moth Control Work 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending- 
December 31, 1938. 

The appropriation of $1,200 was made for this work last year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $433. The labor 
and running expense of the sprayer and truck was about $393. 
This included one spray throughout the town, also a second spray 
in the badly infested sections. 

The balance of the appropriation was used for creosoting 
gypsy moth egg clusters along the highways and for other neces- 
sary work as directed by the State. 

An appropriation of $1,20,0 is recommended for moth con- 
trol which will include a spray throughout the town, and a second 
spray of the badly infested areas. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Supt. 



Report of Superintendent of Streets 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report covering the highway main- 
tenance and construction work during 1938. 

In addition to regular maintenance work, such as scraping, 
dragging, surface repair, patching and oiling. 

New gravel, widen and oil: Conant Street, new gravel and 
oil, 1500 feet; Pond Street. 1300 feet new gravel; Carlisle Road, 
1400 feet gravel ; Robbins Street, 650 feet gravel ; Martin Street, 
drainage, repaired 162 feet; High Street, 720 feet cable wire; 
Central Street, 890 feet cable wire and 89 posts; River Str-eet, 
new gravel and oil 600 feet; Central Street, 4 new catch basins 
and 609 feet of 12-inch concrete pipe; Nashoba Road, 600; feet 
new gravel. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. PERKINS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



4 



—59— 



Assessors' Report — 1938 

Tax assessed as follows : 

Buildings, exclusive of land .... $2,490,570.00 

Land 686,885.00 

Personal 420,560.00 

^3,598,015.0^ 

Valuation January 1, 1937 3,589,855.00 

Increase in valuation 8,160.00 

Rate of taxation, $29.00 

Real Estate $92,146.20 

Personal Estate 12,196.24 

Polls 1,554.00 

$105,896.44 

Amount of Money Raised: 

State Tax $4,640.00 

County Tax 5,870.88 

State Parks Tax 102-25 

1937 Underestimates — 

County, State, State Parks Tax 
69.89 450.00 30.62 550.51 

Auditing Municipal Accounts . . . 818.49 

Town Grant 90,453.79 

Overlay 3,460.52 

— $105,896.44 

Added Assessment: 

Personal , . $800.00 $800.00 

Tax: 

Personal $23.20 

Polls 28.00 

51.20 

Excise : 

Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1096 

Total Valuation of Motor Vehicles $247,760.00 

Rate of Taxation, $35.15 

Total Excise Tax $7,392.13 

ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
HENRY L- HAYNES, 
LLOYD W. PRIEST, 

Board of Assessors. 



—60— 
Report of Tax Collector 

1936 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan, 1, 1938 $11,696.50 

Interest Collected 891.54 

$12,588.04 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $11,798.59 

Abated 658.35 

Tax Titles 131.10 

$12,588.04 

1937 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $34,256.06 

Interest Collected 846.41 

$35,102.47 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $24,880.88 

Abated 253.65 

Tax Titles 131.10 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 9,836.84 

$35,102.47 

1938 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $104,365.64 

Interest Collected 25.76 

$104,391.40 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $68,582.87 

Abated -. 466.90 

Tax Titles 931.62 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 34,410.01 

$104,391.40 



—61— 

1935 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $10.53 

Interest .35 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $2.95 

Judgment 7.93 

1936 EXCISE TAX 

Dr, 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $902.54 

Interest Collected 87.76 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $893.40 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 96.90 



1937 EXCISE TAX 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $2,649.05 

Interest Collecfted 56.99 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer . $1,600.94 

Abated 45.45 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 1,059.65 



1938 EXCISE TAX 
Dr. 

Committed $7,392.13 

Interest 46.46 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $6,888.21 

Abated 146.07 

Uncollected 404.31 



$10.88 



$10.88 



$990.30 



$990.30 



$2,706.04 



$2,706.04 



$7,438.59 



$7,438.59 



—62— 

1936 POLX. TAX 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 . $70.00 

Interest 4.03 

Cost 8.40 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $62.43 

Abated 20.00 



1937 POLL TAX 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 $322.00 

Interest 3.73 

Cost 20.30 



Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $142.03 

Abated 52.00 

Uncollected 152.00 



$82.43 



$82.43 



$346.03 



$346.03 



1938 POLL TAX 
Dr. 

Committed $1,582.00 

Cost 33.60 

$1,615.60 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,307.60 

Abated 52.00 

Uncollected 256.00 

$1,615.60 

SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

Total Debits 

1936 Town Tax $12,588.04 

1937 Town Tax 35,102.47 

1938 Town Tax 104,391.40 



—63— 

1935 Excise Tax ... 10.88 

1936 Excise Tax 990.30 

1937 Excise Tax 2,706.04 

1938 Excise Tax . . -7,438.59 

1936 Poll Tax . 82.43 

1937 Poll Tax 346.03 

1938 Poll Tax 1,615.60 



Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $116,159.90 

Abated 1,694.42 

Tax Titles 1,193.82 

Judgments 7.93 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 46,215.71 



$165,271.78 



$165,271.78 

CARRIE M. DUKEE, 

Collector of Taxes. 



Fire Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1938. 

The total number of alarms responded to by the entire depart- 
ment are as follows : 

Buildings, 15 ; Auto, 2 ; Chimney, 14 ; False, 1 ; Emergency 
Calls, 2; Out of Town, 1. 

Total Labor cost of extinguishing — $479.20. 

The Fire Department as a whole is in very good condition all 
the apparatus and equipment are in first class shape, but due to 
the storm last fall I feel that this year is not the proper time 
to cut the appropriations so I would recommend the usual 
amount to hose. 

The Acton Center and South Acton Stations have been pro- 
perly insulated and are in better condition than they have been 
for some time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR. 
Chief of Fire Department. 



Forest Wardens Report 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for the 
year ending December 31st, 1938. 

Total number of fires responded to 29 

Out of Town none 

Total labor cost of extinguishing $339.75 

Total property lost in dollars and cents . . $925.00 

The forest fire truck and equipment are in good condition. 
Owing to the hurricane last fall the fire hazard this Spring 
will be greater than it ever has been or ever will be again, for 
this reason I would recommend an expenditure of at least 8200 
dollars for additional equipment. Our woodlands are really in 
a serious condition and a fire might be disastrous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



—65— 
Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1938. 

An appropriation of $700 was made for this work last year. 
$500 of this amount was used for emergency work, removing 
trees and damaged limbs. The remaining $200 was used for 
planting new trees along the town highways. 

At present, the trees are in very bad shape as a result of the 
hurricane. They should be pruned, bolted and fed. More trees 
should be removed. 

Approximate number of trees that should be trimmed 

to be saved — 4750. 

Approximate number of trees that should be removed 

—157. 

Approximate number of trees that should be fed — 250. 

Although new trees should be planted, I feel that for the 
coming year the money appropriated should be spent in caring 
for the trees damaged by the hurricane. 

I therefore recommend, in the event the W. P. A. project on 
tree work does not continue, that $9,000 be appropriated for the 
removing, trimming, bolting and feeding of trees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden- 



Report of Superintendant of Town Forests 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton : 

I am glad to report that the September hurricane did very 
little damage to the promising growth on the existing Town 
Forest. I recommend that the management of the Town Forest 
in the future be placed in the hands of a Town Forest Committee 
as provided in G. L., C. 45, P21. This committee should be 
composed of three members who shall choose their own chair- 
man, and shall serve without compensation. One member of 
said committee shall be appointed each year for a term of three 
years, except that, when first appointed, one shall be appointed 
for a term of three years, one for a term of two years, and one 
for a term of one year. 

The hurricane has focussed attention on our forests. The 
value of the Town Forest movement is emphasized on all sides. 
We should welcome the gift of any and all forest land even that 
which has been stripped of trees by the hurricane. Under proper 
forest management, our Town Forest will in years to come fur- 
nish wood to our needy and produce timber for sale. The Town 
Forest can be made self supporting. 

Some assistance next year would be welcomed so that a start 
can be made with thinning and weeding. 

ALBERT R. JENKS, 
Superintendent of Town Forests. 



Report of Sponsor's Agent 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

During the year, work was done on the following W. P. A. 
projects: Moth Control, Nagog Hill Road, Hurricane Emer- 
gency, Tree Trimming and Fire Hazard. 

The expenditures on these projects for the year were: 

Federal Funds $17,655.38 

Sponsor's Funds 11,207-85 

Total expenditures for year $28,863.23 

Respectfully submitted, 

VIRGINIA MILBERY, 

Sponsor's Agent. 



—67— 
Report of Chapter 90 Foreman 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

. I herewith submit the following report on Chapter 90 new 
road construction on Main Street in 1938. 

Construction was started on September 12. Brush was cut 
and 13 trees removed. Excavation of old roadbed was also begun 
during which about 2000 cubic yards of material was removed 
and backfilled on shoulder slopes of low areas. Gravel subgrade, 
the placing of about 2382 cubic yards of gravel was started on 
September 29. Drainage installed consisted of 3 catch basins, 
44 feet of reinforced concrete pipe and two 2x4x6 foot stone 
mortar masonry headers. Placed stone base using 1362.75 tons 
of 2 inch broken stone. Stone base was penetrated with 8979 
gallons of asphalt and sealed with 61.55 tons of 1-2 inch broken 
stone. Finished surface of bituminous concrete (Type I Seald- 
rok) 563.45 tons was placed in 3 days beginning October 25. 
The road was closed during this operation greatly increasing 
efficiency and improving finished road. One hundred ninety feet 
of cable guard rail was installed. The heavy cuts were loamed 
and seeded. Cleaned up all construction debris and tools* closing 
job November 12. 

Specifications for road were: six inches or more of suitable 
gi'avel subgrade, 4 inches of 2 inch broken stone penetrated 
with 1 1-2 gallons per square yard of asphalt and 1 1-2 inches 
of bituminous concrete. 2170 feet of 24 foot roadway was built 
170 feet of which were runoffs built to meet grade of old road. 

Four hundred fifty feet of road was left in between the new 
construction because in soundings conducted by a Department 
of Public Works Engineer about 20 feet in depth of muck and 
silt was recorded. It was advised that this area be left for a 
future date calling for a rather heavy expenditure in building a 
new bridge, excavating and backfilling with a more stable mater- 
ial thereby preventing the road from losing its shape. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Chapter 90 Foreman. 



—68— 
Report of Sponsor's Foreman 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report on the Work Relief Project on 
Nagog' Hill Road in 1938. 

The project called for the widening and surfacing of 16840 
square yards of road from a width of from ten to fourteen feet 
to twenty-four feet. It required the removal of 20 trees, 1200 
cubic yards of excavation for subgrade and 400 cubic yards of 
roadway ledge. An estimated 5000 cubic yards of gravel to be 
placed and 230 cubic yards of stonewalls to rebuild. 

Drainage installed consisted of five new culverts for which 
the following amounts of pipe were used : 86 feet of 12 inch ton- 
can iron culvert pipe, 32 feet of 24 inch and 36 feet of 72 inch 
nu-arch culvert pipe. Two 4x4x6 foot concrete drop inlets, one 
I%x4x6 foot and two 11/2x10x12 foot stone mortar masonry 
headers and 72 lineal feet of stone masonry abutments were 
built. 

From May 31st, beginning of work on project, until closing 
due to transfer of men to emergencj^ hurricane projects the fol- 
lowing estimated amounts of work were accomplished : 20 trees 
removed, 900 cubic yards of earth excavated for subgrade, 285 
cubic yards of roadway ledge blasted and removed, 150 cubic 
yards of stonewalls rebuilt and 3100 cubic yards of gravel 
placed to build 3550 feet of road. The entire surface of new 
construction was asphalt treated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Sponsor's Foreman. 



—69— 
Report of Town Foreman 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report covering work on drainage on 
School and River Streets in 1938. 

A much needed improvement, namely, eliminating trouble- 
some lateral drains was accomplished. This work was necess- 
itated by the July floods. 

The following drainage was installed : 8 new catch basins, 
4 new manholes, 3 catch basins remodeled, 12 feet 18 inch plain 
concrete sewer pipe for outlet, 96 feet 12 inch reinforced con- 
crete culvert pipe for laterals from catch basins to manholes, 
688 feet 12 inch plain concrete sewer pipe for main, and one 
2x4x8 stone mortar masonry header at outlet. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Town Foreman. 



Report of Board Of Health 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, The Board of Health of 
Acton herewith submits the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1938- 

There was a change in the personnel of your Board during 
the past year due to the passing on of Doctor Frank E. Tasker, 
who for many years was associated with the Board and in late 
years was chairman. Lowell H. Cram was appointed to fill the 
vacancy, sworn in, and became a member of the Board in July 
and was elected by the Board to become its secretary, in August 
assuming the duties of clerk. 

It has been necessary to hold regular monthly meetings and 
one special m.eeting, officially called, also three other meetings of 
the complete Board on investigations. 

The town has been free from a serious run of communicable 
diseases during the past year, only very few cases reported and 
these isolated and with no spread. 

The heaviest expense of the Board this year was in maintain- 
ing the town dump, keeping it in as sanitary and clean condition 
as was possible. The greatest load came immediately after the 
hurricane and continued until the end of the year, due to the 



—To- 
dumping of brush and stumps which had to be taken care of 
by burning and covering. This will continue for some time to 
come. 

It seemed our duty to employ a substitute nurse, as last year, 
during the vacation of our regular town nurse. 

As the regulations of the Board of Health, published and 
adopted in July 1901, and there being no record of any new 
ones or amendments to those already published, it became neces- 
sary that the Board adopt and publish additional ones pertaining 
especially to the carting of swill or oifal through the thickly 
populated part of the town, the keeping of swine and poultry, 
and the licensing of sellers of milk, the latter going into effect 
January 1, 1939. 

Burial permits issued 39 

Residents who died in other towms 14 

Total number of deaths recorded 53 

Lists of contagious diseases reported to Board of Health 
January 1, 1938 to January 1, 1939. 

Dog Bite 12 

Chicken Pox 5 

German Measles 1 

Influenza 3 

Pulmonary T. B 1 

Scarlet Fever 1 

Vincents Angina • • • • ■*■ 

Total 24 

Deaths none. 
Your Board requests the continued support of the people in 
their endeavor to carry on the necessary work for the best in- 
terests of the town as a whole. 

We would recommend the appropriation of $1,200.00 next 
year to carry on the necessary work of the Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DR. 0. LAWRENCE CLARK, Chairman, 
LOWELL H. CRAM, Sec-Clerk, 
MRS. SIMON TAYLOR, 
ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, Agent, 

Board of Health. 



—71— 

Report of Town Nurse 

January 26, 1939. 
The Board of Health 
Acton, Massachusetts 
Gentlemen, 

I herewith submit my report as public health nurse for the 
year ending December 31st, 1938. Nursing services were as 
follows : 

Bedside nursing 1559 

Welfare calls 342 

Pre-natal Calls 171 

Postnatal Calls 108 

Child Welfare 217 

Social service 126 

The school population has been practically free from com- 
municable diseases. Cases which were suspicious were referred 
to physicians for diagnosis. 

At the Middlesex County Hospital at Waltham, twenty cases 
received examination and X-ray. Return visits w^ere scheduled 
when necessary. The hospital offers its services to the county 
without charge in an effort to control the spread of tuberculosis 
by early examination and diagnosis. 

The diptheria immunization was done in the spring. The 
results showed an increase in numbers of the pre-school group. 
In the group of 55 immunized, 26 (47%) were below the age of 
five years. Schick testing was not done, either before or after 
the toxoid was given. 

We have had two demonstration Well Child Conferences con- 
ducted by the State Department of Health. The results of 
these Conferences showed the necessity of clinics and the in- 
terest on the part of the parents. At the first conference, child- 
ren from 4 to 6 years old were examined, the latter conference 
included children from 6 months to 4 years. In both conferences, 
152 children were examined. It is my hope that a permanent 
Well Child Conference will be established during the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for donations of clothing and 
other materials which have been helpful in my work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Mrs.) GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



—72— 
Report of Trustees of Goodnow Fund 



For the year ending December 31, 1938. 



INVESTMENTS 

Warren Institution for Savings . . . $1,465.53 
Charlestown Five Cents Savings 

Bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 1,000.00 



RECEIPTS 

Warren Institution for Savings ... $29.45 
Charlestown Five Cents Savings 

Bank 30.00 

City Institution for Savings . 25.00 



PAYMENTS 

Harian E. Tuttle, treasurer of the 

Evangelical Church in Acton ... 64.45 

Town of Acton for care of lot in 

Woodlawn Cemetery 20.00 



CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 



$3,465.53 



$84.45 



$84.45 



Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



— V3— 



Report of the Work of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service In Acton for the Year 1938. 



The following- report is given of the work of the Middlesex 
County Extension Service for 1938 in the town of Acton. 

The year was a difficult one for farmers, with the heavy rains, 
followed by the hurricane. For the dairy farmers, many found 
themselves without a market on short notice and time was spent 
in contacting new markets to take care of the local milk. Many 
farmers requested soil tests and recommendations concerning 
pasture improvement, top dressing and reseeding were given. 
Following the hurricane, assistance was rendered in the market- 
ing of apples and methods to follow in re-setting trees. A large 
number of the poultry farmers requested personal farm visits 
and twenty-eight poultrymen were assisted in this manner. 
Acton serves as the meeting center for the County Poultry 
Association and assistance is rendered this organization in 
obtaining some of their speakers. General assistance was given 
the Middlesex County Fair, held in Acton, with judges furnished 
for several of the departments. 

Following the hurricane, with so many farmers having down 
timber a great deal of time was spent on getting the Govern- 
ment program under w^ay for salvaging timber and reducing the 
fire hazard. Also, some farmers were helped in obtaining loans 
to take care of the hurricane losses. 

The Acton town committee of the home department of the 
Middlesex County Extension Service consists of Mrs. Elwin 
Hollowell, chairman, and Mrs. Albert Durkee and Mrs. Warren 
Davis assisting. During February, March, April and May, 1938, 
the homemakers attended the series of meetings on Money 
Management. The total attendance was one hundred and eigh- 
teen. A group of homemakers took the project, "Little Girls' 
Dresses." In the summer of 1938, July and August, the Acton 
homemakers attended the three meetings offered on Food 
Preservation with fifty attending. Also, during the summer, a 
group of homemakers took Clothing Construction. The fall of 
1938 brought Acton Consumer Buying of Food, October, Novem- 
ber and December. 



—74— 

In Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Work the following people have 
furnished leadership: Committee members — Mrs. Albert P. Dur- 
kee, Mrs. Arthur Raymond and Mrs. Ella Torkelson. Leaders: 
Miss Ruth Berglind, Miss Jessie Kinnevan, Mrs. Cliiton Stearns, 
Miss Helen Creeley, Miss Christine Leavitt, Mrs. E. H. Hollo- 
well, Miss Gloria Wamboldt, Miss Nancy Starbuck, Mr. Elmer 
Gowan, Mr. Frank Braman and Mr. George Yale. Boys and girls 
were enrolled in the following clubs : Home Furnishing, Cloth- 
ing, Book Lovers, Flower Garden, Poultry, Garden and Agri- 
culture, with a total enrollment of forty-nine girls and thirty- 
seven boys. Robert Rimback and Bessie Davis were awarded a 
Two Day Trip to the Massachusetts State College for doing out 
standing Club Work. Catherine Cullinane was awarded a trip to 
the County Camp for doing the best work in her club. Cash 
prizes were awarded for the flower garden club by the Acton 
Garden Club. 

The Middlesex County Fair again cooperated in a splendid 
way in putting on a fine 4-H Club exhibit. 



Report of Sealer of Weights and Measures 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit, the report of the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the year 1938. 

I have tested and sealed 442 weighing and measuring devices, 
condemned 2 and not sealed 5. 

The general condition of devices used throughout the town 
is very good, and merchants more than willing to cooperate in 
the maintenance of them in such good order. 

During the year, many amendments have been made to the 
statutes governing weighing and measuring devices and new 
laws enacted. These are brought to the attention of users 
through this department and the Department of Standards. 

Total sealing fees collected $76.42 

Paid Town Treasurer $76.42 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARE A. MILBERY, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures- 



—75— 
Librarian's Report 1938 



Accessions — Number of volumes in Library Jan. 1, 1938, 
20,898. Increase by purchase, 325. Increase by gift, 64. 
Total increase, 389. Withdrawn from circulation, 163. Total 
number of volumes in Library January 1, 1939 — 21,124. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was open, 104. 

Number of volumes circulated, 15,030. 

Largest daily circulation, 253, on Feb. 16th. 

Smallest daily circulation, 6, on Jan. 1. 

Daily average circulation, 144 plus. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and paid to 
Town Treasurer, $53.19. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following sources : 
U. S. Govt, 2; State of Mass., 9; Mrs. E. M. Bragdon, 39; Ernest 
H. Washburn, 4 ; Edith Nourse Rogers, 2 ; R. M. Bowen, 1 ; 
Marion Burrage, 1; Birth Control League, 1; Deeret & Co., 1; 
American Tobacco Co., 1 ; Mildred P. Moore, 1 ; Mrs. Frank 
Peters, 1; Franklin Charter, 1. Total, 64. 

Mrs. 0. D. Wood was appointed Assistant Librarian this year. 
Gift of five oil paintings of Acton places was made by Arthur F. 
Davis to the Library, and are now on view in the Library book 
room. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 1938 



NON-FICTION 

Abbott, A. P.— The Greatest Park in the World 917.3A131g 

Aesop — Fables (With Biography) 88A254f 

Agar H. — The Pursuit of Happiness 32A261p 

Aiken, G. D. — Speaking from Vermont 32A291s 

Anon — Blackstone River Drainage Basin 51A100ibI 

Anon— Geodetic Bulletin, 1938 51A100g 

Anon — How to Make Good Pictures 77A100h 

Anon — New England Hurricane 917.3A100n 

Bacon, E. M.— Boston— A Guide Book 917.3B128b 

Barnes, R. A. (Ed) I Hear America Singing 80B261i 



—76— 

Beebe L.— High Iron, A Book of Trains 38B414h 

Bell, A. W.— Cape Cod Color 917.3B4331c 

Benson, E. F. — Queen Victoria's Daughters 923B474e 

Bradford G.— Letters, 1918 - 1931 922B799b 

Bragger & Rolfsen— Fridtjof Nansen 1861-1893 928N188b 

Brooks, V. W. (P:d) Journal of Gamarliel Bradford 922B799br 

Brinley G. — Away to the Canadian Rockies 917.1B858a 

Carpenter, F. — Tales of a Chinese Grandmother 39C295t 

Clark, E. T.— The Small Sects in America 28C592s 

Clark, N. M.— John Deere 922D312c 

Conklin, M. G.— Conversation Hints 37C752c 

Craig, J. D. — Danger is My Business 910C886d 

Cram, R. A. — Heart of Europe 914C889h 

Crane, C. E.— Let Me Show You Vermont 917.3C8911 

Crow, C— 400 Million Customers 915.1C953f 

Curie E.— Madam Curie 928C975c 

Daniels, J. — A Southerner Discovers the South . . . .917.3D186s 
Davies, E. C. — A Wayfarer in Estonia, Latvia 

and Lithuania 914.9D255w 

DeKruif, P.— The Fight For Life 61D329f 

Demaitre, E.— New Guinea Gold 919.3D369n 

Dietz, D.— Medical Magic 61D566m. 

Ditmars, R. L. — The Book of Insect Oddities 59D615bp 

Downey, F. — Portrait of An Era as Drawn by 

C. D. Gibson 922G448d 

Dudley, C. M.— 60 Centuries of Skiing 79D847s 

Early, E.— Behold the White Mountains 917.3E12b 

Eberlein & Ramsdell — Small Manor Houses and 

Farmsteads in France 914.4E16s 

Editors Pop. Science— Fix It Yourself 68A100f 

Ekins & Wright— China Fights For Her Life 951E36c 

Etnier, E.— On Gilbert Head— Maine Days 917.3E84o 

Fairchild, D.— The World Was My Garden 910F165w 

Flannagan, R. C— The Story of Lucky Strike 63F.583s 

Floherty, J. J. — Sons of the Hurricane 35F628s 

Forbes, A.— France and New England 973.2F692f 

Fox, L. — Antarctic Icebreakers 919.9F792a 

Frost, J.— Fancy This a New England Sketchbook . . . .74F939f 

Gaer, J.— (Ed.) Massachusetts — AGuide Book 917.3G128m 

Galloway, B. T.— Commercial Violet Culture 63G174c 



—77— ■ 

Gatti, A.— Great Mother Forest 916.7G263g 

Ghirardi, A. A. — Modern Radio Servicing 62G425m 

Gibbs, C. S.— A Guide to Sexing Chicks 63G442g 

Goldmark & Hopkins— The Gypsy Trail 80G618g 

Goodspeed, C. — Yankee Bookseller 922G654g 

Gray, E. J.— Penn 922P377g 

Gurman, J. & Slager, M.— Radio Round-up 921G978r 

Halsey, M.— With Malice Toward Some 914H196w 

Harkness, R.— The Baby Giant Panda 59H283b 

Hawley, R. C.— Manual of Forestry 63H396m 

Hawthorne, H.— The Happy Autocrat 922H752h 

Hertzler, A. E.— The Horse and Buggy Doctor 922H576h 

Hexamer, F. M. — Asparagus 63H614a 

Hollis, I. N.— The Frigate Constitution 973.5H742f 

Hooton, E. A. — Apes, Men and Morons . .57H789a 

Hungerford, E.— Daniel Willard Rides the Line 922W6921h 

James, J. A.— Oliver Pollock 922F777J 

Johnson, M. — Over African Jungles 916J68o 

Johnston, R. W.— The Country Craftbook . 68J73c 

Jones, P. T.— Welsh Border Country 914.2J78w 

Kent, R.— Wilderness 917.3K37w 

Kimball & Decker— Touring With Tent and Trailer 79K49t 

King, C. H.— When I Lived in Salem, 1822-1866 922K52k 

Lindbergh, A. M.— Listen! The Wind 910L7421 

Linke, L.— Allah Dethroned 915.6L756a 

Lyons, E. — Assignment to Utopia. 922L9821 

McAdam, R. W.— The Old Fall River Line 38M113o 

McCormack, W. R.— The 1938 Book of Small Houses .72M131n 

McDonald, P. B.— A Saga of the Seas 922F456m 

Mackay, D. — The Honorable Company-Hudsons Bay 971M153h 

Maltby, L. M.— It's Fun to Cook 64M261i 

Maurois, A. — The Miracle of England . 942M457m 

Mees, C. E. K.— The Fundamentals of Photography . . .77M494f 

Mingos/H. (Ed.)— Flying for 1936 62M664f 

Nogales, M. C. — Heroes and Beasts of Spain 914.6N774h 

Nutting W.— New Hampshire Beautiful 917.3N976n 

Pach, W.— Vincent Van Gogh 925V253p 

Pettengill, S. B.— Jefferson the Forgotten Man 32P499J 

Rabelais, F.— Works— vol. 2 84R114w 



—78— 

Rand, E. K.— A Walk to Horace's Farm 914.5R186w 

Rand McNally— Boston Guide Book . . . .917.3R186b 

Rawson, M. N. — Country Auction 81R262c 

Rawson, M. N.— From Here to Yender 973.2R262f 

Ridgway, W. H. — The Christian Gentleman 20R544c 

Roberts, C— The Middlesex Canal, 1793-1860 974.5R643m 

Roberts, K.— Trending Into Maine 917.3R645t 

Roberts, K. L.— Sun Hunting 917.3R645s 

Robinson, E. A. — Collected Poems, 5 vols 81R659c 

Rowlandson, M. — Captivity and restoration of 

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson 973.2R883n 

Russell, T. H. — Motor Boats, Construction and 

operation 62R967m 

Salaman, M. C. — Etchings of Francis Seymour Hayden 76S159e 

Sanford, A. R. (Ed.) American Patriotic Plays 81S224a 

Sawyer, J. D.— Washington, 2 vols 922W318sa 

Schlink, F. J.— Eat, Drink and Be Wary 64S344e 

Seldes, G.— Your Money and Your Life 33S465y 

Seredy, K.— The White Stag 39S483w 

Sbackleton, R.— The Book of Boston 917.3S291b 

Shackleton, R.— The Book of New York 917.3S291bo 

Shackleton, R.— The Book of Washington 917.3S291bp 

Stanford, A.— Men, Fish and Boats 63S785m 

Stanford, A.— Navigator 922B785s 

Sterry & Garrigus — They Found a Way, the story of 

Connecticut's restless people 974.6S838t 

Stevens, W. 0. — Old Williamsburg and Her 

Neighbors 917.3S846o 

Sullivan, J. W. N.— The Limitations of Science 50S9491 

Teasdale, S.— Poems 81T253c 

Vandercook, J. A.— Dark Islands 919.3V231d 

Waldman, M. — Biography of a Family 925D376w 

Washburn, E. H. — Album of Historic Acton Houses 917.3W314p 

Weygandt, C— The White Hills 917.3W546w 

White, W. A.— A Puritan in Babylon 922C774wh 

Wilson, C. M. — Aroostook, Our Last Frontier 917.3W747a 

Winwar, F.— Puritan City, Salem, Mass 974.5W794p 

Yates, R. F. — Exploring With the Microscope 57Y33e 

Yutang, L. — The Importance of Living 17Y94i 



—79-^- 

FICTION 

Adams, M.— They Fought for Liberty A2151t 

Allen, H. — Action at Aquila A426ac 

Austin, F.— King of the Range A935k 

Ayers, R.— And Still They Dream A977st 

Bailey, T. — Tomorrows Promise B156to 

Baldwin, F.— Hotel Hostess B181h 

Baldwin, F. — Men Are Such Fools .BlSlme 

Baldwin, F.— Private Duty BlSlpr 

Baldwin, F. — Twenty-four Hours a Day BlSltw 

Banning, M. C— The First Woman B219f 

Banning, M. C— The Third Son B219t 

Barnes, M. A.— Wisdom's Gate B261wj 

Bassett, S. W.— New England Born B319n 

Bassett, S. W.— Shining Headlands B319sh 

Belasco, D. — The Return of Peter Grimm B425r 

Berry, R. A. — The Holding of Recapture Valley B534h 

Bindloss, H.— The Lure of the North B6121u 

Birmingham, G. A. — Spanish Gold B619sp 

Birney, H. — Barrier Ranch B6192b 

Birney, H. — Forgotten Canyon B6192f 

Birney, H. — A Stranger in Black Butte B6192s 

Bottome, P.— The Mortal Storm B751m 

Bower, B. M. — Five Furies of Leaning Ladder B786fi 

Bridge, A. — Illyrian Spring ...... ... B851i 

Brooks, S. W.— As the World Goes By B8732a 

Bruce, G.— Navy Blue and Gold B886n 

Brush, K.— Don't Ever Leave Me . B912d 

Burgess, G. — Two o'clock Courage .B955t 

Burman, B. L. — Steamboat Round the Bend B962s 

Burt, S. — Entertaining the Islanders B9735e 

Canfield, D. — Basque People C222ba 

Cendrars, B.— Sutter's Gold C395s 

Christie, A. — The Boomerang Clue C5551bo 

Cloete, S.— The Turning Wheels C646t 

Coatsworth, E.— Here to Stay C652h 

Codv, S.— Gun Smoke Cure C6712g 

Cole, J. — Outlaws of Caja Basin C689o 

Coolidge, D.— Hell's Hix) Pocket C7742he 

Ccolidge, D.— Wolf's Candle C7742wo 



—80— 

Corbett, E.— After Five o'clock C789a 

Corbett, E. — The House Across the River C789h 

Cunningham, E. — Quick Triggers C9732q 

Cunningham, E. — Riders of the Night C9732r 

Day, C— Life With Mother D2731h 

De la Roche, M.— Growth of a Man D339g 

Dell, E. — The House of Happiness D357hp 

Dixon, T. — The Clansman . D621c 

Douglas, L. C. — Home for Christmas D734h 

Eden, R. — Love or Money E221 

Eden, R. — Trapped By Love E22t 

Ferguson, B. S. — Boxwood F3522b 

Feiguson, B. S. — Blossoms in the Moon F3522bl 

Fletcher, J. S.— Murder of the Only Witness F613md 

Ford, P. L. — Janice Meredith F7113J 

Goold, M. N.— The Ship of Destiny G659s 

Greene, W. C— A Deeper Root G8121d 

Gregory, J.— The Lords of the Coast G8221o 

Gregory, J. — Mountain Men G822mo 

Grey, Z. — Riders of the Spanish Peaks G842rb 

Gunn, T.— The Sheriff of Painted Post G976s 

Hammett, D.— The Glass Key H224g 

Hilton, J.— Knight Without Armor H656k 

Holloway, L. C. (Ed.) The Woman's Story H745w 

Holton, E. A.— Stormy Weather H758s 

Hughes, R.— The Golden Ladder H894g 

James, W. — Flint Spears J29f 

Jenkins, W. — Black Sheep J521b 

Kelland, C. B.— Star Rising K293st 

Kelm, K.— The Cherry Bed K296c 

Krey, L.— And Tell of Time K92t 

Kyne, P. B. — Comrades of the Storm K99co 

Kyne, P. B.— Two Make a World K99tw 

Lane, R. W.— Freeland L266f 

Lawrence, J. — If I Have Four Apples L421i 

Lawrence, J. — Years Are So Long L421y 

Lee, May C. — A Quaker Girl of Nantucket L479q 

Lincoln, F.— Nod L736n 

Lincoln, J. C— A. Hall & Co L7372ha 

Lutz, G L. Hill— Brentwood L975br 



—81— 

McCord, J.— Silver Linings M131s 

McDonald, L.— Silver Platter M1353s 

McDonald, L.— Young and Fair .M1353y 

Miller, H. R.— His Rise to Power M6481h 

Montgomery, L. M. — Jane of Lantern Hill M787j 

Norris, K. — Heartbroken Melody N856he 

Norris, K. — You Can't Have Everything N856yo 

Oppenheim, E. P. — The Colossus of Arcadia 062co 

Orczy B. — The Scarlet Pimpernel 063s 

Parmenter, C. W. — Swift Waters P254sw 

Parmenter, C. W.— The Wind Blows West P254w 

Payne, E. S.— The Tide Always Rises P3461ti 

Prouty, 0. H.— Lise Vale P9681 

Randall, J.— In Lilac Time R243i 

Randall, J.— Maid of Honor R243m 

Rister, C. — Boss of the Badlands R597b 

Russell, W. C— A Marriage At Sea . R968m 

Russell, W. C— The Good Ship Mohawk R968go 

Salminen, S. — Katrina SlTlk 

Seltzer, C. A. — Coming of the Law S468co 

Seltzer, C. A.— The Trail of Yesterday .S468tr 

Shann, R.— With All My Heart . S528w 

Sharp, M.— The Flowering Thorn S5312f 

Short, L.— The Feud of Single Shot ... .S5591f 

Simon, C. M. — The Share-cropper S594s 

Singmaster, E. — The Loving Heart .S6171 

Steele, W. D.— Storm S8142s 

Stern, G. B.— Oleander River . S839o 

Stevenson, R. L.— Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde . S848dr 

Strong, P. — Stranger's Return S877s 

Tarkington, B. — Presenting Lily Mars T176pr 

Tarkington, B. — Rumbin Galleries T176ru 

Tracy L.— The Pelham Affair T761p 

Tuttie, W. C— Tumbling River Range T9671tu 

Van Vorst, M.— Traditions V284t 

Wallace, E.— The Man at the Carlton W188ma 

Wallace, F. — Autumn madness W1881a 

Wayne, P.— Take My Heart W359t 

Wentworth, P.— Blindfold W479bl 

Wharton, E. — The Buccaneers W553b 



—82— 

Widdemer, M.— Hand On Her Shoulder W638h. 

Widdemer, M. — Marriage Is Possible W638ma 

Wilder, I.— Heart Be Still W6731h 

Willoughby, B. — River House W739ri 

Wister, 0. — Members of the Family W817m 

Wodehouse, P. G. — Summer Moonshine W838su 

Woodrow, W.— The Beauty W893b 

Wright, P. H.— So We'll Live W9524s 

Young, F. B.— They Seek a Country Y715t 

JUVENILE 

Abbott, J.— Low Bridge JA13221 

Aldis, D. — Jane's Father JA363J 

Alger, H. Jr. — Strong and Steady JA395s 

Allee, M. H.— The Little American Girl JA4221 

Ames, E. M.— Young Andy JA5131y 

Angelo, V. — Nino JA584n 

Anon — The Night Before Christmas JAlOOn 

Atwater, E. P. — In Oceanland JA887i 

Baker, N. B.— The Luck of the Solabars JB16831 

Baldwin, A. H.— So'west Goes North JB1811so 

Barringer, M. — The Four and Lena JB276f 

Bartlett, A. C— Hustler, the Farm Dog JB2891h 

Beach, C. A. — Air Service Boys Flying for France . . . JB3652a 

Bell, L. P. Sick-a-bed Sally JB434s 

Berry, E.— Honey of the Nile JB5342h 

Best, H.— Tal of the Four Tribes JB561t 

Blank, C. — The Adventure Girls at Happiness House. . .JB643a 

Bonehill, R. — Young Hunters in Porto Rico JR712y 

Boswell, H.— French Canada J9B747f 

Bowen, 0.— A Terrier's Tale JB786t 

Brock, E.— High In the Mountains JB864h 

Brooks, W. R.— The Clockwork Twin JB8736c 

Brown, I. — Romany Road JB8771r 

Busch, W.— Max and Moritz JB977m 

Buswell & Others— Jolly Number Tales JB981 j 

Butler, E. P. — Jippy Jones and the Alligator JB986ji 

Carrick, A. V.— Kitty Cat Tales JC316E 

Cavanah, F. — A Patriot in Hoops JC377p 

Cheley, F. H.— By Ember Glow JC5161by 



—83— 

Conner, S.— The Fighting- Starrs of Oregon JC7521f 

Cracken, H. M. — Iglaome, the Lone Hunter JC884i 

Crownfield, G. — Strong Hearts and Bold JC953s 

Curtis, H. P.— Jean & Co., Unlimited JC979J 

Dana, C. A. (Translator) German Fairy Tales JD167g 

Darwin, B, — Elves and Princesses JD2281e 

Davis, E. v.— Celiacs Choice JD2611c 

Davis & Edholm — Every Girls Mystery and 

Adventure Stories JD2612e 

Dawson, G. S.— The Nuggets of Singing Creek JD2721n 

DeAngeli, M. — Copper-toed Boots JD283c 

Demuth, A.— Trudi and Hansel JD389t 

DeSegur, M. — At the Inn of the Guardian Angel JD451a 

Dixon, W. M.— Cinderella's Garden JD6211c 

Durell, C. P.— Heave Short JD965h 

Erick, A. — A Yankee Crusoe JE68y 

Fairfax, V. — The Camp's Strange Visitors . JF163c 

Fellows, M. H.— Little Magic Painter JF3221i 

Ferris, E. E. — Jerry of Seven Mile Creek JF3941J 

Finger, C. J. — Bobbie and Jack and the Mailman JF497b 

Finley, R. T.— The Castaways JF511c 

Garrott, H.— First Aid to Santa Claus . JG2431f 

Graydon, W. M. — Canoe Boys and Campfires JG778c 

Grove, H. P.— The Secret of Steeplerock . JG8831s 

Hall, E. G.— Haverhill Herald JH175h 

Hamilton, C. J. — The story of Steady and Sure JH218s 

Handforth, T.— Mei Li JH236m 

Harper, W. (ed.) The Lonely Little Pig . JH29511 

Hathaway, K. B.— Mr. Muffett's Cat and Her 

Trip To Paris JHg63m 

Hawkes, C. — A Gentleman From France JH392g 

Hawkes, C. — A Master Frisky JH392m 

Helton, R. — Jimmy Sharswood JH484J 

Hill, J. Jr. and Mother— In Little America With Byrd . J9H646i 

Jarden, M. L. — The Young Bronte's JJ37y 

Johnson, E. — Natalie JJ67n 

Johnson, E. — Runaway Balboa JJ67r 

Jones, I. W. — Peetie, the Story of a Real Cat JJ77p 

Justus, M. — The House In No-end Hollow JJ96ho 

Kahmann, C. — Lupe and the Senorita JK121 



—84— 

Kay, R. — The Go-ahead Boys and the Mysterious House JK23g 

Kempf, M. C— Winter Visit JK321w 

Kent, L. A.— He Went With Vasco da Gama JK371h 

Kummer, F. A. — The Great Road JK96g 

Lavell, E. — The Mystery of the Secret Band JL399m 

Lawrence, J. — Linda Lane's problems JL421I 

McDonald, R. M. E.— Nelly Custis Daughter of 

Mount Vernon J9M135n 

Malkus, A. S. — Eastward Sweeps the Current JM251e 

Mallett, G. E. — Chee-cha-ko JM253c 

Marble, A. R. — From Boston to Boston JM312f 

Mason, M. E.— Smiling Hill Farm JM3982s 

Miller, W. H.— Under the Admiral's Stars JM652u 

Moffitt, V. M.— Great Horse JM6951g 

Morse, G. — Vanishing Liner JM885v 

Noirthup, T.— The Phantom Code JN878p 

O'Donnell, E.— The Boys Book of Sea Mysteries J9026b 

Ogden, H. A. — The Boys Book of Famous Regiments . . . J9034b 

Oldf ellow, A.— Uncle Nat J044u 

Oppenheimer, A. V. — Us Kids J062u 

Otis, J.— With Warren at Bunker Hill J088wl 

Otis, J. — Wrecked on Spider Island J088w? 

Otis, J. — When Dewey Came to Manila J088wh 

Patterson, A. W. — Redcoats at Castine JP3171r 

Peary, McA.— Musk Ox Little Tooktoo's Friend JP3621m 

Pease, H.— Fog Horns JP363f 

Pease, H.— Jungle River JP363J 

Persons, H. M.— The Mystery of Arnold Hall JP467m 

Petersham, M. & M. — Stories from the Old Testament JP484sw 

Phillips, E. C— Calico , JP558c 

Plowhead, R. G. — Josie and Joe JP732J 

Rains, A. C. — Lazy Liza Lizard JR1541 

Reeves, E.— Lindberg Flies On J9R3321 

Robinson, M. L. — Robin and Heather JR663r 

Robinson, T. — Buttons JR665b 

Rosenthal, M.— Junior Fire Chief JR814J 

Sauer, G. S.— The Patchy Zoo JS255p 

Sherman, H. M. — Interference . JS553i 

Sherwood, E. — Lucky and His Friend Steve JS5541 

Shirk, J. C— Bela the Juggler JS561b 



—85— 

Smalley, J.— How It All Began JS635h 

Sperry, A.— Little Eagle , . . JS7511 

Stewart, A. B.— Little Brother Goose JS84911 

Theiss, L, E.— Flood Mappers Aloft JT376fn 

Toner, R. J. — Midshipman Davey Jones JT664m 

Verrjll, A. H. — An American Crusoe JV555am 

Wakeling, A. — Things To Make In Your Home 

Workshop . W149t 

Walden, A. T.— Leading A Dog's Life JW1621 

Warner, A. S.— Days of Gold JW279d 

Wilson, E. H.— About Ricco JW747a 

Worthington, F.— The Little Wise One JW9331 

Wright, P. L.— The Eastbound Air Mail JW9512e 

REFERENCE 

Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts, 1937. 
Annual Report Smithsonian Institution, 1937. 
Annual Proceedings American Legion, 1937. 
Annual Proceedings U. S. War Veterans, 1937. 
Annual Proceedings Veterans' Foreign Wars, 1937. 
Congressional Directory of 75th Congress, U. S. 
Journal of the House of Representatives, Mass., 1938. 
Journal of the Senate of Mass., 1938. 
Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of Civil War, Index. 
Report of the Librarian of Congress, U. S. 

Soils and Men — Agrieultural Report, U. S. Gov., Worfd Al- 
manac. 



—86— 
REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



February 8, 193 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

I 'hereby submit my report covering the financial transactions 
of the town for the year ended December 31, 1938. 

I wish at this time to call attention to the different depart- 
ments of the town the importance of rendering* all bills for 
payment promptly at the end of the year. I was obliged to csirry 
over several bills into 1939; some could have been paid had they 
been turned in earlier as the appropriations were/ not all used. 
All persons having money due from the town should render 
their bills promptly. 

The town was fortunate to have funds available to meet the 
extra costs caused by the hurricane. 

I am submitting a comparative balance sheet. You will notice 
the overlay surplus account has been reduced considerably but 
the surplus revenue account remains about the same. The to^vn 
is still in a good financial condition. 

AUDITING 

I have audited the books of the tax collector and verified the 
cash on hand and in the bank. Notices were mailed to delin- 
quents during the past year. I have checked the treasurer's 
cash and verified the various trust funds in his custody. 

I have verified the funds in the custody of trustees. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



—87— 

Expenditures 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Appropriation $6,300.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 422.67 



SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

James E. Kinsley, chairman, salary $300.00 

Ralph W. Piper, salary 200.00 

Raymond F. Durkee, salary 200.00 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 466.90 

Virginia Milbery, postage 31.50 

Virginia Milbery, sundry items .... 1.80 
Memorial Press, town reports .... 349.40 
News-Enterprise, envelopes, print- 
ing 20.00 

James E. Kinsley, attending meet- 

: ings 21.70 

Ralph W. Piper, postage 3.63 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., stationery . . 5.03 

Frank E. Sanderson, stationery .... 3.25 
Middlesex County Selectmen's Assn., 

memberships . 6.00 

Murphy & Snyder, easements, signs 8.50 

COLLECTORS' DEPARTMENT 

Charles A. Durkee, collections $225.00 

Est. of Charles A. Durkee, collec- 
tions 192.43 

Carrie M. Durkee, salary 1,000.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books ...... 16.73 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 44.90 

Robinson Seal Co., forms 53.75 

Allen Bros. Corp., repairing stamps 1.20 

L. L. Applin, examining records .... 2.00 

Carrie M. Durkee, postage '. . . 137.40 

Carrie M. Durkee, tax title expense 

and examing records at Cambridge 21.57 



$6,722.67 



1,617.71 



1,694.98 



—88— 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT 

Henry L. Haynes, salary $300.00 

Albert P. Durkee, salary 300.00 

Lloyd Priest 225.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., forms, stat- 
ionery 64.15 

Murphy & Snyder, letterheads 22.40 

L. L. Applin, transfer notices 23.20 

Wm. J. Good, legal services 35.00 

News-Enterprise Co., street books . . 80.00 
Henry L. Haynes, express, postage, 

telephone 16.62 

Henry L. Haynes, attending meet- 
ings 20.00 

Albert P. Durkee, attending meet- 
ings 20.00 

Lloyd W. Priest, attending meetings 10.00 

George R. Barnstead, tax cards ... 1.00 



TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT 

Wm. Henry Soar, salary $500.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage 123.70 

Wm. Henry Soar, telephone 12.95 

Wm. Henry Soar, certifying notes 4.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, stationery 6.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes, print- 
ing 28.08 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 13.49 

Maynard Trust Co., safe deposit box 5.50 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Howard L. Jones, salary $400.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books, sta- 
tionery 10.45 

Frank E. Sanderson, stationery .... 3.10 

Murphy & Snyder, printing ........ 28.86 

Howard L. Jones, postage ........ 9.00 



1,117.37 



693.72 



451.41 



-89- 



TOWN CLERK 

J, L. Fairbanks & Co., folders $3.53 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 6.75 

S. M. Spencer Mfg. Co., rubber 

stamp 1.98 

Robinson Seal Co., cards, seals 3.60 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Clare A. Milbery, salary and trans- 
portation ?200.00 

Clare A. Milbery, attending meetings 

two days 9.50 

Robinson Seal Co., book 1.85 

Clare A. Milbery, two keys .40 

Boston Stencil and Stamp Works, 

dies, seals 10.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Carl E. Backman, chairman $125.00 

Raymond L. Hatch 75.00 

Mary M. Laffin 75.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF AGENT 

Waldo J. Flint, salary $50.00 

Sanderson's, book 1.00 



15.86 



221.75 



275.00 



51.00 



CATTLE INSPECTOR 
E. E. Allsopp, salary on account 95.00 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 

Murphy & Snyder, printing $185.05 

News-Enterprise, advertising 15.28 

Robinson Seal Co., seals 2.56 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., forms 3.82 

Hayward & Fullonton, repairing bal- 
lot box .50 

R. Dexter Tolman, ballot box 70.75 

Times Printing Co., forms 1.50 



-90— 



Sec'y of the Commonwealth 2.75 

Katherine Kinsley, clerical work . . . 3.00 

Clare Milbery, clerical work 3.00 

Fred S. Whitcomb, officer 3.00 

Peter Duggari, officer 9.00 

D. F. McDonald, officer . 6.00 

Fiavelock Schnair, officer 9.00 

rheron Lowden, officer ........... 3.00 

Thomas Yetman, officer 6.00 

James P. Brown, officer 3.00 

Clare A. Milbery, officer . 9.00 

Sophie Walsh, officer 3.00 

Clarence Robbins, officer 6.00 

Bertram D. Hall, officer 3.00 

Harry Holt, officer 3.00 

John J. Duggan, officer 6.00 

Thomas Murray, officer 3.00 

Lewis C. Hastings, officer 3.00 

Anne Christoff'erson, officer 3.00 

Grace Cullinane, officer 3.00 

Frederick Whitcomb, officer 3.00 

Arthur F. Davis, officer 6.00 

Paul A. Coughlin, officer 9.00 

James W. Coughlin, officer 9.00 

Samuel Knowlton, officer 3.00 . 

Theron Lowden, setting up booths . 1.25 

William Lawrence, setting up booths 2.00 

O. D. Wood, setting up booths 5.00 

Clarence Braman, setting up booths 2.50 

Universalist Church, rent 15.00 

West Acton Women's Club, rent . . 5.00 

Albert P. Durkee, moderator 35.00 

Arthur W. Lee, registrar and recount 22.00 

Total General Government . 

Unexpended balance 



486.96 

$6,720.76 

1.91 



$6,722.67 



—91— 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Appropriation . $1,500.00 

Transferred from reserve fund : ... 486.78 

Bursaw Gas and Oil Co. . $217.86 

N. E. Tel. and Telephone Co. .... 90.31 

Boston Edison Co ... . . 143.11 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. .... 22.54 

0. D. Wood, janitor ............ 195.25 

0. D. Wood, labor and supplies on 

flag pole 15.40 

0. D. Wood, hurricane damage . . 25.00 

• 0. D. Wood, repairs, cleaning .. 30.64 

Morse Oil Co., gasoline 3.70 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

' coal 90.50 

B. A. King, electrical work and 

supplies 63.80 

Edward Anderson, repairing boiler 5.00 

Concord Ice Co., slabs 10.00 

A. W. Haynes, labor 3.75 

A. W. Davis Co., wax 3.60 

West and South Water Supply . . 12.00 

Eastern Lumber Co., wood ...... 38.00 

Mass. Reformatory, chair 7.00 

Samuel Knowlton, painting can- 
non 25.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., supplies .... 12.52 

Parker Hardware Co., rake ..... .69 

Spencer Taylor, care of lawn .... 144.29 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., gravel 27.92 

George L. Noyes, supplies ...... 1.65 

Standard Oil of New York, asphalt 86.65 

A. L. Freese, labor, supplies .... 11.90 

W. A. Freeman, labor, gauge ... 8.15 
W. A. Rayner, care of lot, E. Ac- 
ton 10.00 

Simon D. Taylor, supplies 3.26 

Commissioner of Public Safety, 

inspection 10.00 



$1,986.78 



—92— 

Rock Wool Insulation Co., South 

Fire House 370.00 

Fred W. Green, care of common, 

W. Acton 9.45 

E. R. Sanborn, insulating Center 

Fire House 198.00 

Allen Chair Co., parts for chairs . 2.76 

Wilho Anderson, repairing boiler 6.00 

Work around Town Hall, labor . 34.90 

Work around Town Hall, trucks 42.00 

$1,982.60 

Unexpended balance 4.18 



$1,986.78 



POLICE 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Paid : 

Michael Foley, salary and trans- 
portation $2,100.00 

Norman Perkins, services 17.13 

George Braman, services 82.18 

Robert Willett, services 44.26 

Lewis Leveroni, services . 17.25 

William Durkin, services 4.50 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 70.85 

Murphj^ & Snyder, letterheads, 

signs, etc 35.67 

Fred W. Yelland, searchlight .... 20.55 

M. Linskey & Bros., uniform .... 51.75 

Argus Mfg. Co., holster and claw 6.9Q 

Frank A. Braman, painting signs 3.00 
A. W. Davis Co., sandpaper, 

paint .45 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 3.30 

Georgia C. Cullinane, court fees . . 9.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber 1.69 

Michael Foley, batteries 1.00 

$2,469.48 

Unexpended balance 30.52 

$2,500.00 



—93— 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation $2,800.00 

Annual pay rolls $457.50 

West and South Water District . . 36.00 

Ivar Peterson, janitor 120.00 

Lyle Reynolds, janitor 120.00 

William G. Lawrence, janitor . . . 120.65 

Pay rolls for fires 476.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co . 95.42 

Boston Edison Co 176.27 

J. G. Flynn, towel service . 12.00 

Lloyd Priest, traffic blocks 12.00 

Ohio Chemical & Mfg. Co., oxygen 

valve, retest 5.25 

Robert M. Wood, install booster 

pump 300.00 

J. Jokinen, chimney 14.00 ' 

Earl Hayward, labor on whistle 6.35 

O. Laffin, Packard auto ^ 50.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, rubber boots 72.00 

Town Shop, gloves 14.22 

Robert M. Wood, suction hose and 

strainer plate 69.50 

George H. Reed, coal 71.97 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 

rope 94.42 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil, etc. ...... 36.16 

A. W. Davis Co., coal, wood ..... 169.99 

A. W. Davis Co., sundry supplies 11.75 

F. Oelschlegel, straps, belts 2.15 

Hayward & Fullonton, transmit- 
ter, repairs 8.60 

Karl Anderson, tape .50 

David Clayton, express 1.25 

R. S. Baker, gas 2.66 

Edwin Anderson, repair boiler . . 2.00 

B. A. King, electrical work 9.74 

H. J. Schnair, setting glass ..... 1.50 

Fitzhenry Guptill Co., parts 2.45 

J. S. Moore, supplies 7.22 



—94— 

Gorham Fire Equipment Co., sup- 
plies 

Belmont Supply Co., supplies . . . 

Acton Motor Co., gas, oil ....... 

Acton Motor Co., labor 

Acton Motor Co., supplies 

Acton Motor Co., inspection 

John Pederson, gas, oil, frame . . . 

Justin A. McCarthy, nozzle frame, 
chargers, and repairing hose . . 



4.00 
21.85 
16.10 
51.50 
42.51 
5.00 
6.60 

71.88 



$2,798.96 
Unexpended balance 1.04 

FOREST FIRES 

Appropriation 

George H. Reed, pump cans $79.50 

A. W. Davis Co., pony shovels .. 25.20 
Belmont Supply Co., clamp and 

menders 12.00 

Justin A. McCarthy, batteries, 

hose 22.10 

John Pederson, gas 2.48 

Fitzhenry Guptill Co., gaskets .... .33 

Pay rolls 354.95 

$496.56 
Unexpended balance 3.44 

FIRE HOSE 

Appropriation 

Justin A. McCarthy Co., hose 

HYDRANTS 

Appropriation • 

West and South Water Supply . . . $2,875.00 

Town of Concord 253.00 



< ' i ' i ' 



$2,800.00 



$500.00 



$500.00 



$550.00 
550.00 



3,128.00 



$3,128.00 



-95^ 



MOTH DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation 

James J. Knight, truck $70.00 

George Morse, labor 73.25 

David Clayton, labor 7.00 

Richard Lowden, labor 111.25 

Richard Sisson, labor • • • • 35.00 

Hugh Hodgen, labor 62.50 

Joseph* Lemoine, labor 3.75 

Harry Conquest, labor . 61.50 

Arthur Conquest, labor . . ...... 49.50 

Harold Knight, labor 19.00 

Oie Granberg, labor 36.00 

Carl Flint, labor 16.00 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 2.00 

A. W. Davis Co., wrenches ..... 2.08 
Acton Motor Co., labor, grease, 

parts 22.50 

George W. Logan, D. & D 30.00 

Montgomery Hardware Co., lead . 360.00 

S. Farquar, tube 2.50 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 44.58 

James J. Knight, conference at 

Boston 2.60 

James J. Knight, sundry items . . 2.45 

James J. Knight, labor 184.55 

$1,198.01 

Unexpended balance 1.99 

TREE WARDEN 

Appropriation . 

James J. Knight, truck $81.13 

James J. Knight, labor 210.00 

Hugh Hodgen, labor 135.50 

David Clayton, labor 3.00 

Richard Sisson, labor 76.00 

George Morse, labor 8.00 

Arthur Tupper, labor 1.50 



$1,200.00 



$1,200.00 



$7oo;oo 



—96— 

Albert Gravlin, labor 1.25 

Arthur Conquest, labor . . 4.00 

Harry Conquest, labor 11.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, brush 1.47 

J. S. Moore , 1.45 

D. L. Parmenter, ladder 6.00 

Sudbury Nurseries, trees 138.60 

H. E. Day, filing saws 8.15 

Morse Oil Co., gas * 1.08 

A. W. Davis Co., saw blade 1.15 

E. P. Gates, tree irons 3.40 

Albert R. Jenks, sulphur 4.32 

James J. Knight, steel die set .... 2.90 

$699.90 

Unexpended balance .10 



STOO.QO 



HEALTH 

Appropriation §1,500.00 

E. E. Allsopp, labor at dump and 

paid out for labor $605.50 

E. E. Allsopp, permits 15.25 

E. E. Allsopp, investigating com- 
plaints, inspections 32.50 

E. E. Allsopp, postage and tel .49 

Acton Motor Co., labor on engine 14.60 

Acton Motor Co., gas, oil 12.92 

W. B. Saunders Co 2.75 

Wm. Munn, inspection of animals 2.60 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., blanks ... .48 

Grace Day, clerk 6.00 

Doctor E. J. Flaherty, services . . 12.00 

J. S. Moore, provisions 32.00 

Simon D. Taylor, provision 44.17 

Strong's Market, provisions 61.14 

Frank A. Teele, Agt., rent 10.00 

Harriman & Prentiss, milk 6.96 

Raymond F. Durkee, milk 9.72 

News-Enterprise Co., adv 5.34 



—97— 

O. L. Clark, services at clinic .... 50.00 
Gorham Fire Equipment Co., 

magnets 10.25 

George A. Morse, truck, gravel . . 7.50 

Dr. Raymond E. Hooper, services 30.00 

Dr. E. A. Mayell, services at clinic 50.00 

Dr. O. L. Clark, book 1.50 

Dr. 0. L. Clark, investigation .... 3.00 

Dr. 0. L. Clark, salary 25.00 

Lillian F. Taylor, town nurse for 

August . 166.68 

Lillian F. Taylor, salary 15.00 

Lillian F. Taylor, investigations . . 5.00 

Lowell H. Cram, salary 7.50 

Lowell H. Cram, clerk, tel., ex- 
press 14.85 

Lillian F. Taylor, services at clinic 10.00 

$1,270.70 

Unexpended balance ......... 229.30 



$2,123.21 

Unexpended balance 76.79 

HIGHWAYS 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

State Aid Chapter 81 8,850.00 

State Aid Chapter 90 2,000.00 

County Aid Chapter 90 2,000.00 

County Aid High St 200.00 



$1,500.00 



TOWN NURSE 

Appropriation . / $2,200.00 

Genevieve J. Creeley, salary, trans- 
portation $2,000.00 

J. Stoler, supplies 71.79 

Mead & Wheeler Co., supplies .. 1.07 

E. F. Mahady Co., supplies 8.05 

Thomas W. Reed Co., supplies . . 42.30 



S2.200.00 



—98- 



Transferred from Reserve fund .... 
Transferred from Reserve High St.. 
State Storm Damage 

Chapter 81 

Standard Oil of New York 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 

Edna Downey, sand 

Ormal Laffin, gravel 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., pea gravel 

W. Kazokas, gravel 

State Prison Colony, guard posts . . 
New England Fence Co., cable guard 
Berger Metal Vulvert Co., culvert . . 
Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement, etc. . . 
State Prison, Town Line Posts 

PAY ROLLS 
Labor : 

A. H. Perkins, Supt 

W. Larrabee 

G. Rugg 

C. Whitcomb 

G. Clayton 

J. Gagnon 

W. Kelley 

E. Noterman 

A. Dubey 

H. Stone 

R. Ashley 

, H. Dunn 

A. Conquest 

G. Rooney 

R. MacDougall 

R. Sisson 

A. Mauro 

A. Morrison 



400.00 

.95 

1,075.00 



$3,957.74 

164.10 

92.40 

83.40 

132.10 

.15 

250.00 

317.10 

124.33 

13.75 

53.40 



$26,525.95 



$1,582.31 

562.25 

407.75 

514.50 

155.00 

149.75 

262.00 

193.00 

399.50 

172.75 

122.00 

110,75 

83.75 

81.00 

66.00 

30.00 

85.00 

68.00 



$5,188.47 



—99— 

M. Farrar 4.00 

J. Johnson 129.50 

W. Pollard 2.75 

G. Wood 6.75 

A. Tupper 317.00 

G. Downey 64.00 

L. Roche 36.00 

F. Braman 9.00 

F, Downey 20.00 

W. Costello ... . 36.00 

G. Anderson 16.00 

S. Paskiewicz 64.00 

C. Monson 70.75 

S, Hagen 21.50 

C.Ferris 4.00 

E. Peterson 3.75 

C. Frost 1.25 

J. Torkelsen 3.75 

N. Perkins . ... 1.25 

D. Kelley 8.00 

T. Newsham . 31.50 

W. Charter 87.50 

L. Leveroni 22.00 

T. Murray 6.00 

L. Stiles 12.00 

W. Bradley 13.00 

G. Turner 31.25 

F. Courville 151.25 

W. Kazokas 25.80 

L. Bradley 8.00 

R. Penney 42.00 

M. Grandburg 10.00 

J. Garceau . 22.50 

T. Moynihan 43.50 

N. Marsh 31.50 

J. Beech ' 6.00 

C. Sherry 12.00 

H. Baveaur 24.50 



$6,444.86 



—100— 



Trucks and Equipment : 

C. Robbins $976.50 

Town of Acton 330-60 

R. Jones 516.75 

C. Kingsley , 708.00 

G. Morse 273.50 

E. A. Anderson 831.75 

H. Gould . 559.50 

L. Perkins . 874.50 

A. Jalonan 475.50 

A. W. Davis 126.00 

J. Briggs 50.50 

H. O. Hartwell, shovel 80.00 

A. Gravlin 88.00 

C. Kazokas 1.00 

L. Smith, shovel 208.25 

$6,100.35 

Total Chapter 81 $17,733.68 

VILLAGE 
No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., pea gravel $14.90 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., rental air compressor 29.25 

Standard Oil of N. Y., asphalt 88.91 

Wm. P- Proctor Co., lumber, cement 309.94 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe, fittings, labor . 46.93 

N. E. Concrete Pipe Corp., pipe .... 196.97 

Winchester Brick Co 56.00 

Bursav^ Gas and Oil Co., oil, gas . . . 9.48 

N. E. Fence Co., cable guard 59.36 

So. Acton Woolen Co., steel shaft . . 1.00 
Robert Willett, painting traffic lines 

and installing signs 21.75 

Timothy Monihan, labor 1.00 

James E- Kinsley, emergency flood 

work 3.00 

Parker Hardware, brooms 5.00 

J. S. Moore, lanterns 5,10 

H. E. Day, filing saws .70 



—101— 



Margaret Spinney, gravel . . . • • 
State Prison, grates, frames . . . 

Edna Downey, sand 

Ormal Laffin, gravel 

Morse Oil Co., oil, gas . . . 

E. P. Gates, sharpen tools 

A. W. Davis Co., paint, wire, etc- 
Pay roil, night of Sept. 21 



3.40 

108.43 

1.80 

1.10 

4.10 

89.70 

38.70 

391.70 



$1,488.22 



PAY ROLLS 
Labor: 

A. H. Perkins, Supt $27.00 

L. Leveroni 4.00 

C, Whitcomb . . 2.00 

G. Rugg 51.50 

W. Kelley . 45.50 

E. Noterman 16.50 

J. Gagnon 16.50 

A. Dubey 8.00 

R. MacDougal 2.00 

W. Kazokas . 81.00 

L. Bradley 49.50 

J. Jarvi . 33.50 

A. Morrison 48.00 

A. Mauro • 32.50 

H. Smith . ; 51.50 

H. Stone 57.50 

G. Charter 12.00 

M. Farrar . 4.00 

G. Downey 27.00 

W. Durkin 4.00 

W. Costello 48.00 

H. Gould 4.00 

Trucks : 

R. Jones $15.00 

C. Kingsley 27.75 

N- Perkins 68.25 

H. Gould 51,75 



$625.50 



—102— 



C. Robbins 4.50 

G. Morse 66.00 

A. Jalonen 27.75 

W. Anderson 12.00 

Total Village 

Chapter 90 

Standard Oil of N. Y $2,153.72 

Mass. Broken Stone Co 138.52 

Ormal L. Laffin, gravel 7.50 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 3.00 

Edna Downey, sand 70.60 

State Prison, grates, frames 102.99 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement 4.46 

PAY ROLLS 
Labor : 

A. H. Perkins, Supt $337.50 

W. Larrabee 50.00 

G. Rugg 109.50 

A. Conquest 70.50 

C. Whitcomb 125.50 

J. Gagnon 24.00 

W. Kelley 36.00 

E. Noterman : 16.00 

A. Dubey 125.50 

H. Stone 20.00 

R. Ashley 16.00 

H. Dunn 20.00 

G. Rooney 16.00 

A. Mauro 66.50 

A. Morrison 148.00 

R- MacDougal .... 50.50 

R. Sisson 54.00 

A. Tupper 8.00 

L. Thatcher 2.00 

Alex. Morrison 8.00 

A. Haynes 4.00 

W. Pollard 8.00 



$273.00 
$2,386.72 



$2,480.79 



—103- 



G. Wood 12.00 

G. Clayton 40.00 

G. Downey . ., 48.00 

L. Roche 83.00 

F. Downey 69.25 

W. Costello 63.00 

W. Charter 8.00 

J. Johnson 51.00 

C. Monson . . 45.00 

L. Leveroni 2.00 

G. Anderson 41.00 

S. Paskiewicz 41.00 

J. Fletcher 4.00 

Trucks and Equipment: 

E. A- Anderson $394.50 

C. Robbins 367.50 

H. Gould 80.25 

A. Jalonen 48.00 

R. Jones 48.00 

G. Morse 12.00 

C. Kingsley 264.00 

L. Perkins 334.50 

A. W. Davis . 60.00 

Town of Acton 91.00 

Total Chapter 90 

HIGH STREET 

N, E. Fence Co., cable guard $158.27 

Standard Oil of N. Y 74.96 

Ormal L. LafRn, gravel 1.20 

Edna Downey, sand . .50 

Wm, P. Proctor Co., cement 6.97 



$1,822.75 



$1,699.75 
$6,003.29 



$241.90 



PAY ROLLS 



Labor : 

A. H. Perkins, Supt- 
W. Larrabee 



$22.50 
7.20 



—104— 

C. Whitcomb 16.00 

G. Rugg 7.00 

W. Kazokas 14.40 

J. Gagnon 17.00 

G. Clayton 5.00 

N. Marsh 2.00 

W. Kelley 3.00 

E. Noterman 1-50 

A. Tapper 3.00 

A. Diibey 1..50 

H. Stone 2.00 

H. Bayeur 3.00 

$105.10 

if'rucks : 

C. Robbins $18.00 

R. Jones 9.00 

C. Kingsley 4.50 

Town of Acton 22.45 

$53.95 

Total High Street $400.95 

Total Highways 26,524-64 

Unexpended balance 1.31 



$26,525.95 
MAIN STREET 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

State Aid Chapter 90 6,300.00 

County Aid Chapter 90 3,150.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund .... .38 

$13,450.38 

Mass. Broken Stone Co $5,695.64 

Standard Oil of New York 633.58 

N. E. Concrete Pipe Corp 363.19 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 126.00 

William Kazokas, lime, paint, brush- 
es ^ 1.75 

Kelley Sales Corp.. brick 62.50 

Vulcan Construction Co., rental of 
roller and rakers, operator and 
transportation 253.75 



-105-^ 



N. E. Fence Co 

M. I. Houghton, planing lumber .... 

Winchester Brick Co 

George H. Eeed, seed 

Ormal Laffin, gravel 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 
State Prison, grate, flanges 



73.50 
.50 

84.00 
1-30 
2.40 

29.69 

44.11 



$7,371.91 



PAY ROLLS 
Labor: 

W. Kazokas, foremen $402.00 

W. Larrabee 202.00 

H. Dunn 84.70 

J. Gagnon 180.95 

M. Farrar . 152.90 

G. Penney 123.10 

R- Sisson 26.50 

W. Kelley 244.20 

H. Stone . 259.60 

L. Thatcher 60.50 

D. Kelley 160.95 

G. Wood .. 133.20 

N. Brackett 48.00 

A. Mauro 138.85 

J. Jarvi 163.90 

W. Durkin 64.50 

F. Roche 46.25 

L. Leveroni 24.80 

J. Fletcher 49.10 

L. Stiles 9.60 

W. Costello 87.93 

G. Rugg 71.64 

A. Morrison 51.60 

H. Smith 35.45 

L. Bradley 2500 . 

Trucks and Equipment: 

A. Jalonen $491.25 

R. Jones 206.25 



$2,847.22 



—106— 

C. Kingsley 191.25 

H. Gould 223.50 

G. Morse 318.00 

A. Gravlin 67.50 

C. Robbins 19.50 : 

L. Smith, shovel 560.00 

Town of Acton 304.00 

$2,381.25 

Total Main Street 12,600.38 

Unexpended balance 850 00 

S13,450.3C 
CHAPTER 500 

Received from State $2,900.00 

Acton Motor Co., tree work $12.00 

A. W. Davis Co., saws, axes, etc. . . . 13.80 

George H. Reed, axes 4.50 

R. J. Rodday Co., axes, saws, rope, 

etc 139.48 

Murphy & Snyder, signs 1.75 

J. S. Moore, axes, wedges, files .... 6.18 

H. E. Day, sharpening saws 11.10 

John Pederson, work on trees 170.75 

Leonard J. Smith, rental of shovel, 

truck 126.00 

James E. Kinsley, expense of car on 

account of hurricane, Sept. 21 to 

Oct. 7 50.00 

Astwood & Townsend, tile 8.10 

Labor 1,797.84 

Trucks 558.50 

S2,90000 

SNOW REMOVAL 

Appropriation $3,600.00 

John Pecjerson, ploughing $792.00 

Edward H. Christofferson, plough- 
ing 355.71 

Levi W. Perkins, ploughing 297.00 

Mrs. Henry Mekkelsen, ploughing 144.00 



—107— 

George H. Reed, ploughing 282.00 

Davis Motor Co., ploughing 370.00 

Conant Machine Co., work on 

plows 13.88 

E. W. Systrom Co., parts 33-60 

A. W. Davis Co., shovels 3.00 

Anderson Engineering Co., parts 10.00 

Edna Downey, sand 11.80 

E. P. Gates, repairing ploughs ... 13.25 

A. W. Davis, repairing ploughs . . 12.00 

Pay Rolls 

Labor $678.50 

Trucks 521.02 

$3,537.76 
Unexpended balance 62.24 

$3,600.00 

STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Boston Edison Co. • $3,368.29 

Unexpended balance , 131.71 

$3,500.00 

MACHINERY ACCOUNT 

Received from, Road Machinery Fund $620.00 

Hedge & Matthews Co., cement, 

mixer $220.00 

J. S. Moore, tools 19.65 

Acton Motor Co., labor, parts . . . 16.50 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 62.23 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas, oil ... 188-84 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., parts . . 46.46 

E. A. Anderson, repairs 2.00 

Parker Hardware, tools : .90 

Acton Granite Co., sharpening 

tools s 2.50 

George H. Reed, tools 4.75 

G. W. Larrabee, gas tank 1.00 



—108— 

Acton Pipe Co., parts, labor on 

roller 7.52 

R. J. Rodday Co., tools 3-50 

E. P. Gates, stone boat, blades for 

hone 40.50 

S616.35 
Unexpended balance 3.65 



Arthur F. Davis, librarian $153.00 

Arthur F. Davis, rebinding books 45.50 

Arthur F- Davis, cataloging ^ 12.26 

Arthur F. Davis, writing cards . . 7.92 

Arthur F. Davis, postage 1.63 

Mrs. 0. D. Wood, assistant libra- 
rian 100.00 

Ralph Rogers, janitor 156.00 

West & South Water Supply 18.00 

Boston Edison Co 44.17 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 345.48 

Chester B. Robbins, insurance . . . 30.97 

Flora B. Reed, librarian 3.00 

John Pederson, fertilizer and labor 17.60 

John Pedersen, tree work 18.00 

George H- Phelps, repairing roof, 

chimneys 60.00 

Samuel Knowlton, painting walls 36.63 

Holliston Mills Inc., glutino 3.01 

Emerson Co., stamp .55 

B. A. King, electrical work 8.00 



$620.00 



TRUCK HIGHWAY DEPT. 

Appropriation $1,200.00 

Appropriation Balance 1,200.00 

LIBRARY MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 61.72 



$1,061.72 



$1,061.72 



-109— 



LIBRARY BOOKS 

Appropriation $200.00 

Received from library fund 431.91 

Encyclopedia Britannica $162.85 

H. R. Huntting Co 136.64 

DeWolfe Fiske Co 94.94 

Union Library 11.58 

Jean Karr 35.11 

Junior Literary Guild .......... 74.00 

George H. B. Turner 2.00 

William A. Wilde Co 8.07 

Commentator Magazine 3.00 

Ginn & Co . 2.59 

Ernest H. Washburn ; 22.75 

New England News Co. ....... . 5.80 

News Enterprise Co 1.50 

Houghton Mifflin Co 8.10 

Chas. E. Lauriet Co. 10.16 

Alexis J. Cohman 5.00 

Friedman's ■ 2.92 

Army & Navy Journal 2.00 

Herman Goldberger . 41.40 

Enterprise Press . 1.50 

BRANCH LIBRARY 

Appropriation 

F. W. Billings, painting . $12.00 

F. A. Merriam, paid for cleaning, 
removing old shelves, rebuilding 

new ones 26.25 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., paint . . 9.80 

Ida Costello, transporting books . 29.00 

Maynard & Acton Oil Co 16.29 

A. F. Davis, painting signs 7.00 

Nashoba Oil Co 3.90 

B. A. King, changing fixtures .... 7.50 
Ralph Anderson, librarian seven- 
teen weeks 34.00 



$631.91 



?631.91 



S300.00 



—no- 
Ralph Anderson four trips to Center 4.00 
Ralph Anderson, sundry expense . . 3.15 



$152.89 
Unexpended balance 147.11 



CEMETERIES 

Appropriation $800.00 

Received from Cemetery Land Fund 500.00 



Y. D. Canvass Co., sod covers . . . $28.00 

Perry Seed Co., rakes 10.14 

Horace F. Tuttle, conference with 

town counsel, attending probate 

court, recording deed in the 

matter of Georgia Whitney 

Chapel 14.91 

Compiling account of perpetual 
funds, writing and recording 

deeds 20.00 

Thomas J. Grey Co., ash barrels, 

seed 26.77 

A. W- Davis Co., fertilizer, paint 29.30 

George H. Reed, fertilizer 50.76 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe fittings, labor 10.14 

C. B. Robbins, insurance 8.00 

Sudbury Nurseries, trees, shrubs 15.90 

Holmerden Co., weed killer 53.90 

Ellis Chemical Co., lead 20.16 

Albert Batley & Son, flowers 31.80 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 16.07 

James J. Knight, spraying ...... 29.86 

Boston Edison Co 5.46 

George Gaboon, sharpening mowers 23.00 

Joseph Micilos, filing saws 2.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber 13.62 

West & South Water Supply 27.47 

Acme Canvass Co-, cover 10.00 



$300.00 



$1,300.00 



■Ill- 



Hosea Gould, trucking 


10.00 


E. R. Sanborn, labor 


. . 7.88 


Fred W. Green, labor 


259.17 


Fred W. Green, horse 


69.80 


Fred W. Green, express 


3.00 


Fred W. Green, clippers ...... 


5.12 


Fred S. Kennedy, labor 


155.00 


Duncan Kennedy, labor 


153.75 


Howard Jones, labor 


168.75 


Harry Scribner, labor 


2.00 


Robert Brown, labor 


16.00 




$1,297.73 


Unexpended balance , 


2 27 



SUSAN HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 



$1,300.00 



Received Int. on funds $1,876.63 

Sidney N. Shurcliff, prof, services. $88.40 
Greenough Bros. Inc., hurricane 

work 1,135.20 

E. L. Willard, humus 15.00 

Thomas J. Grey, lawn seed 11.50 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lath .90 

Fred W. Green, labor 103.38 

Fred W. Green, horse 28-75 

Fred S. Kennedv, labor 109.50 

Duncan S. Kennedy, labor 107.50 

Howard Jones, labor 96.00 

Robert Brown, labor 16.00 

Elwin Hollowell, labor 142.50 

John D. Smith, labor 22.00 



$1,876.6 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 



Received Interest on Fund $25.00 

Fred W. Green, care of lot 25.00 



—112— 

PERPETUAL CARE 

Received Interest on funds $1,538.18 

George H. Reed, fertilizer $50.76 

A. W. Davis Co-, fertilizer 24.40 

Acton Motor Co., oil 2.40 

Herman W. Parker, flowers 8.00 

Albert Batley & Son, fertilizer . . 79.80 

Fred W. Green, labor 261.57 

Fred W. Green, horse 17.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 383.00 

Duncan Kennedy, labor 362.50 

JHoward Jones, labor 348.75 

$1,538.18 

CEMETERY SURPLUS 

Received interest on fund $51-35 

Worcester Lawn Mower Co., mow- 
ers $46.07 

Worcester Lawn Mower Co., parts 5.28 

— $51.35 



MRS. SARAH WATSON DONATION 

Received cash $500.00 

Greenough Bros., Inc., work on 

hurrican damage $382.70 

Elwin Hollowell, labor 115.50 

E. P. Gates, tools 1.80 



$500.00 



CEMETERIES FOR HURRICANE DAMAGE 



Transferred from Cemetery Land Fund $600.00 

Leonard J. Smith, removing 

stumps $170.00 

Greenough Bros., Co., removing 

stumps, etc 236.00 

E. P. Gates, tools .30 

Fred W. Green, labor 34.38 

FVed W. Green, horse 9.75 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 46.50 



113- 



Duncan Kennedy, labor 31.50 

Howard Jones, labor 46.50 



$574.93 

Appropriation balance 25.07 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from overlay surplus . . 2,500.00 

Town cases $7,468.78 

Town of Maynard 765.64 

Town of Westford 39.00 

Commonwealth of Mass 70.00 

ADMINISTRATION 

Carl Backman, travelling expenses $50.00 

Mary Laffin, travelling expenses 6.00 

Raymond Hatch 8.50 

Raymond Hatch tel., lie .85 

Virginia Milbery, key . .25 

Virginia Wilber, key .25 

Sanderson's, book 4.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books, 

forms 29.49 

Howard Wilson, drafting affida- 
vits 10.00 

Clare Milbery, services 5.00 

News-Enterprise Co., printing .... 9.25 

$8,496.76 

Unexpended balance 3.24 



STATE AID 



$600.00 



$8,500.00 



$8,500.00 



Appropriation $800.00 

Paid $445.00 

Unexpended balance 355.00 

$800.00 



—114— 

MILITARY AID i 

Appropriation $200.00 

Paid . . ........:. 80.00 

Unexpended balance 120.00 

$200.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Transferred from Overlay Surplus . 1,000.00 

$2,500.00 

Orders of Soldiers' Relief Agent . 2,133.68 

Mass. Soldiers' Relief Ass'n mem- 
bership 2.00 

Murphy & Snyder, printing appli- 
cations 18.62 

Waldo J. Flint, travelling ex- 
pense 19.50 

Waldo J. Flint, telephone .70 

$2,174.50 
Unexpended balance 325.50 

$2,500.00 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Balance January 1, 1938 $16.49 

Appropriation 1,800.00 

Received Federal Grant 489.39 

Amount due from Federal Grant . . 106.50 

$2,412.38 

Orders of the board of Public Wel- 
fare . $2,143.50 

Appropriation balance 268.88 

$2,412.38 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Balance January 1, 1938 $934.87 

Appropriation 14,000.00 

Received Federal Grant 10,054.00 

Amount due from Federal Grant ... 2,101.50 

$27,090.37 



—US- 
Orders of the Supervisor of Old Age 

Assistance $25,621.58 

Appropriation balance 1,468.79 



ADMINSTRATION ACCOUNT 

Balance Jan. 1, 1938 $37.45 

Received Federal Grant 334.58 

Amt. due from Federal Grant 69.00 

Carl Backman, supervisor, travelling 

expense 285.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., blanks, etc. . 7.21 

Appropriation balance 148.82 



WORK RELIEF 

Balance Jan. 1, 1938 $2,764.31 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 500.00 

Transferred from overlay surplus . . 3,500.00 

Transferred from surplus revenue . 6,500.00 

Berger Metal Culvert Co 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement, lui^- 

ber 

J. S. Moore, supplies 

Frost Insecticide Co., brushes, 

poles 

Jas. Higgins & Son, creosote .... 

Athol Motor Ex. Co 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., compressor rental . 355.88 

No. Middlesex Washed Sand and 

Gravel Co., bulldozer, rental... 214.00 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 126.50 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 60.30 

Edna Downey, sand . 6.60 

Ormal LafRn, gravel 31.70 

Wm. Henry Soar, writing project 3.50 

Acton Pharmacy, supplies 4.94 



$27,090.37 



$441.03 



$441.03 



$461.83 


$13,264.31 


58.69 
3.71 




18.35 

77.76 
8.41 





—116— 

Am. Cyananide & Chemical Co., 

dynamite 57.75 

Horace F. Tuttle, taking levels, 

plans, blueprints 26.20 

Lowell Iron & Steel Co., rods 3.46 

Parker Hardware Co., tools 23.63 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 48.00 

E. P. Gates, chains, repairs 20.75 

Simon Taylor, oil .13 

George H. Reed, cement 2.60 

James E. Kinsley, travelling exp., 

tel 8.90 

Leonard J. Smith, removing 

stumps 3,525.00 

James J. Knight, tel., sundry 

items 3.63 

Labor 1,947.04 

Trucks 3,365.50 

Leonard J. Smith, shovel 391.00 

Town of Acton, machinery 301.80 

H. E. Day, sharpening saws .... 18.00 

$11,175.56 
Unexpended balance 2,088.75 

$13,264.31 

EDUCATION 

Appropriation $47,000.00 

Transferred from reserve fund .... 100.00 

$47,100.00 

Orders of School Committee (see re- 
port) $47,098.63 

Unexpended balance 1.37 

$47,100.00 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Orders of School Committee $2,998.24 

Unexpended balance 1.76 

S3,000.00 






—117— 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Appropriation $400.00 

Paid : 

Spaulding Moss Co., tracing cloth $5.45 

Horace F. Tuttle, surveying, blue- 
prints 40.35 

Raymond Stuart, drafting on zon- 
ing map 32.50 

N. H. Tenney, plugging cannon. . 3.00 

Ruth M. Parker, stenographic 

services 1.50 

Modern Blue Print Co 1.05 

State Prison, signs 35.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, flags 16.90 

C. M. Durkee, robbery insurance, 

3 years 50.00 

Maryland Casualty Co., dept. Col- 
lectors' Bond 10.00 

Roy 0. Leonard, repair weather 

vane 140.00 

Todd Sales Co., check writer 60.32 

Laffin's express .35 

$396.42 

Unexpended balance 3.58 

' $400.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Appropriation $275.00 

Paid: 

Town Shop, flags $17.25 

Lovell Bus Lines 30.00 

So. Acton News Co., food ... 29.78 

G. H. Finan, flowers 32.50 

Newton Post 48, American Legion 

Band 100.00 

O. H. Howe, flowers 27.60 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., paint 3.36 

$240.49 

Unexpended balance 34.51 

• $275.00 



—US- 
LIABILITY INSURANCE 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Paid : 

Theron F. Lowden, premiums ... $816.51 

Unexpended balance 183.49 

$1,000.00 



COUNTY HOSPITAL 

Appropriation $2,554.85 

Middlesex County Maintenance .... $1,011.55 
Middlesex County Alterations 1,543.30 



$2,554.85 



BONDS 

Appropriation $236.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund ... 27.50 

$263.50 

Paid : 

Charles A. Durkee Agency $263.50 

DOG OFFICER 

Appropriation $200.00 

Paid: 

Eraser Kennels $200.00 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 

Appropriation $100.00 

Appropriation balance $100.00 

JONES ATHLETIC FIELD 

Appropriation $300.00 ^ 

Howard A. Wilson, transferring 

and recording $57.30 

J. S. Moore, wheelbarrow, rake . . 6.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas oil 22.25 

Hayward & Fullonton, repairing 

tractor 1.00 

Ralph Jones, loam 6.00 

Eden Cahill, labor 86.50 

$179.05 

Unexpended balance 120.95 

$300.00 



—119— 

INTEREST ON NOTES AND BONDS 

Appropriation $760.00 

Merchants National Bank $680.00 

Alfred L. Ripley 78.76 

$758.76 
. Unexpended balance 1.24 

' — $760.00 

INTEREST ON REVENUE LOANS 

Appropriation $300.00 

Merchants' National Bank $292.50 

Unexpended balance 7.50 

$300.00 

NOTES AND BONUS 

Appropriation $5,500.00 

Merchants' National Bank High 

School Bonds $4,000.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, Fire Truck Notes . 1,500.00 

$5,500.00 

NO APPROPRIATION ITEMS 
Revenue Loans 

Merchants' National Bank $35,000.00 

Agency: 

State Tax $9,860.00 

State Auditing . . 818.49 

State Parks . . 113.03 

County Tax 5,879.15 

County Dog Licenses 872.00 

$17,542.67 

Refunds: 

Taxes $102.45 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 227.18 

$329.63 



—120— 

SUMMARY OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DEPARTMENTAL 

EXPENDITURES 

Receipts 

Treasurer's receipts as his itemized 

report $243,301.54 

Cash balance, January 1, 1939 31,179.75 

$274,481.29 

Expenditures 

General Government $6,720.76 

Buildings and Grounds 1,982.60 

Police 2,469.48 

Fire Department 2,798.96 

Forest Fires 496.56 

Fire Hose 550.00 

Hydrants 3,128.00 

Moth Department 1,198.01 

Tree Warden 699.90 

Health 1,270.70 

Town Nurse 2,123.21 

Highways 26,524.64 

Main Street 12,600.38 

Chapter 500 2,900.00 

Snow Removal 3,537.76 

Street Lighting 3,368.29 

Machinery Account 616.35 

Library Maintenance 1,061,72 

Library Books 631.91 

Branch Library . . . . , 152.89 

Cemeteries 1,297.73 

Susan Hosmer Cemetery Fund 1,876.63 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund . . . 25.00 

Perpetual Care Funds 1,538.18 

Cemetery Surplus 51.35 

Mrs. Sarah Watson Donation 500,00 

Cemeteries for hurricane damage . . 574.93 

Public Welfare 8,496.76 

State Aid 445.00 

Military Aid 80.00 






—121— 

Soldiers' Keiief 2,174.50 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,143.50 

Old Age Assistance 25,621.58 

Old Age Assistance Administration 

Account 292.21 

Work Relief 11,175.56 

Education 47,098.63 

School Building and Repairs 2,998.24 

Unclassified 396.42 

Memorial Day 240.49 

Liability Insurance 816.51 

County Hospital 2,554.85 

Bonds 263.50 

Dog Officer 200.00 

Jones Athletic Field 179.05 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 758.76 

Interest on Revenue Loans 292.50 

Notes and Bonds 5,500.00 

Revenue Loans 35,000.00 

State Tax 9,860.00 

State Auditing 818.49 

State Parks 113.03 

County Tax 5,879.15 

County Dog Licenses 872.00 

Refunds. 329.63 

$245,296.30 

Cash Balance December 31, 1938 . . 29,184.99 



RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 

Work Relief $500.00 

Bonds 27.50 

Highways 400.00 

High Street .95 

Main Street .38 

Building and Grounds 486.78 

Education 100.00 

Librarv Maintenance 61.72 

General government 422.67 



$274,481.29 



$2,000.00 



—122— 

STATEMENT OF MACHINERY FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1938 $656.83 

Received from Town of Acton 1,104.85 

Received from Bursaw Gas & Oil Co. 10.80 

$1,772.48 

Trans, to Machinery Account $620.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1938 1,152.48 

$1,772.48 

STATEMENT OF CEMETERY LAND FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1938 $1,101.00 

Received from Sale of Lots and Tim- 
ber 255.00 

$1,256.00 

Transferred to Cemetery Account . . $1,100.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1938 156.00 

$1,256.00 



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—126— 
Treasurer's Report 

For Year Ending December 31, 1938 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1938. 
Cash Balance, January 1, 1938 $31,179.75 

Receipts for 1938: 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Highways $14,731.53 

Old Age Assistance 7,689.19 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 12,351.91 

Aid, Dependent Children, Federal...... 584.05 

Income Tax 11,909.75 

Temporary Aid 1,031.82 

Reimbursement — Loss on Taxes 569.43 

Chapter 500 2,900.00 

Tuition of Children 680.52 

Highways and Drains 1,075.00 

Training Schools 115.86 

Income Tax (Chapt. 362) 199.91 

Corporation Tax , 8,709.98 

Veterans' Exemption 34.43 

State Aid 240.00 

Military Aid 38.00 

Corporation Tax B 150.97 

Aid to Dependent Children 609.26 

$63,621.61 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Highways 1,206.79 

Dog Officer (reimbursement) 416.00 

Highways (High St.,) 1,600.00 

Highways (Main St.,) 1,724.06 

Dog Licenses (refund) 552.57 

Board of Health (vaccine) 236.00 

$5,735.42 



—127— 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee, ■ - 

Collector of Taxes. 

Excise Taxes 1935 $2.95 

Poll Taxes 1936 62.43 

Excise Taxes 1936 893.40 

Town Taxes 1936 11,798.59 

Poll Taxes 1937 142.03 

Excise Taxes 1937 1,600.94 

Town Taxes 1937 . 24,880.88 

Poll Taxes 1938 1,307.60 

Excise Taxes 1938 6,888.21 

Town Taxes 1938 68,582.87 

$116,159.90 

Miscellaneous Receipts : 

McNiff Inc., License $100,00 

Harold Robblee, License 100.00 

Alfred Casassa, License 100.00 

Warren J. Davis, License 100.00 

James J. Mahoney, License 100.00 

Rodolph Clouette, License 100.00 

Lockwood Inc., License 100.00 

Selectmen, Licenses 55.00 

Horace F. Tiittle, Dog licenses 861.20 

Cemetery Commissioners, Lbr. sold .... 41.30 

Charles Mitchell, Tuition 102.63 

Arthur F. Davis, Library fines 43.24 

Arthur F. Davis, Magazines sold ...... 9.95 

Board of Health, Nurses services 90.50 

Board of Health, Alcohol permit 1.00 

Concord District Court, Traffic Signal . . 3.50 

0. D. Wood, Dances 186.00 

Town of Maynard, Welfare 213.77 

Horace F. Tuttle, Lots sold W'dlawn 90.00 

City of Somerville, Old Age Assist 105.84 

Robert Poland, Tuition 35.97 

Board of Health, Milk licenses 30.00 

Town of Acton, Mach. acct 1,094.85 

Clare Milbery, Sealer wts. 76.42 

0. D. Wood, Grange 69.75 

Fred W. Green, Lots sold Mt. Hope 160.00 



—128-^ 

Boston & Maine R. R., Fires 111.35 

Boston & Maine R. R., Snow removal . . . 4.50 

Tax Collector's Bonds, Refund 77.04 

Hosea Gould, Mach. acct 10.00 

Director Standards, Licenses 40.00 

Town of Stow, Old Age Assist 60.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Rev. loan 25,000.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Rev. loan 10,000.00 

Frank Farrar, Tax Title, 802.95 

Frank Farrar, Interest 104.16 

Town of Maynard, Old Age Assist 120.00 

Sarah Watson, Dedication reim 18.22 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition 1,941.06 

Concord District Court, Fines 36.45 

City of Lowell, Old Age Assist 60.00 

Town of Westford, Schools 183.99 

Town of Orange, Welfare 80.23 

Town of Arlington, Old Age Assist 50.00 

City of Springfield, Old Age Assist 35.50 

Arthur D. Raymond, P. P. Tax Title 292.02 

Arthur D. Raymond, Interest 50.32 

0. D. Wood, Sheehan reunion 7.00 

Town of Concord, Land Tax 25.12 

Selectmen, Telephone .35 

City of Maiden, Old Age Assist 60.00 

Lumbermens Mutual Co., Claim 39.58 

Sarah Watson, Woodlawn cemetery .... 500.00 

Joseph Beardsoll, Sign damage 5.48 

O. D. Wood, Republican rally 2.50 

Markell Service Co., Claim 22.50 

Fred W. Green, Rent low^ering device . . . 57.00 

O. D. Wood, Whist parties 5.00 

0. D. Wood, Basket ball 10.00 

Merchants Nat'l Bank, Rev. loan 10,000.00 

Town of Hudson, Old Age Assist. ...... 60.00 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., Mach. acct 10.80 

Chief of Police, Revolver permits 7.50 

Transfer, Cemetery Surplus 51.35 

Transfer, Wilde Memorial Library 431.91 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund . . 1,876.63 



—-129— 

Transfer, Cemetery Fund 1,538.18 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund 25.00 

$57„784.61 



Total Cash Receipts ..,i $243,301.54 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1938 31,179.75 



Sum Total for 1938 $274,481.29 

Payments in 1938: 

Selectmen's Orders $234,504.78 

State Taxes 10,791.52 

$245,296.30 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1938 $29,184.99 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS: 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 148, Due Aug. 

1, 1939 . $1,500.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 149, Due Aug. 

1, 1940 $1,500.00 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 153, Due June 25, 

1939 $25,000.00 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 155, Due June 28, 

1939 $10,000.00 

High School Bonds, Due 1939 to 1945 $13,000.00 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938: 

Principal Fund $82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 7.56 

$82,246.51 

Received Interest: 

Franklin Inst. Savings $75.00 

Lynn Five Cent Saings 62.50 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 97.14 

Springfield Inst. Savings 75.00 

Leominster Savings 75.00 

Worcester North Savings 100.00 

North Middlesex Savings 75.00 

Cambridge Savings 105.00 



—ISO- 
Hudson Savings 125.00 

Marlboro Savings 135.00 

Waitham Savings 100.00 

Andover Savings 83.33 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

East Cambridge Savings 75.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 150.00 

Lexington Savings 100.00 

Home Savings 60.00 

Farmers & Mechanics Savings 125.00 

Winchendon Savings 150.00 

Medford Savings 75.00 

Wildey Savings 56.25 

Athol Savings 37.50 

Arlington Five Cent Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) 24.98 



Balance December 31, 1938: 

Andover Savings $4,000.00 

Arlington Savings 4,000.00 

Athol Savings 3,000.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Cambridge Savings 3,500.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 5,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 3,000.00 

Farmers and Mechanics Savings 5,000.00 

Franklin Inst. Savings 3,000.00 

Home Savings , 3,000.00 

Hudson Savings 5,000.00 

Leominster Savings 3,000.00 

Lexington Savings 4,000.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 2,500.00 

Marlboro Savings 4,500.00 

Medford Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,238.95 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) 182.63 

North Middlesex Savings 3,000.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings 3,000.00 



$2,051.70 

$84,298.21 



—131— 

Waltham Savings 4,000.00 

Wildey Savings 2,500.00 

Winchendon Savings 5,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 4,000.00 

$82,421.58 

Transfer to Town Account 1,876.63 



$84,298.21 



CEMETERY FUNDS 
Balance January 1, 1938 : 

Principal Fund $39,962.21 

Unexpended Balance 4,633.36 



Received for Perpetual Care: 
Luther Billings and 

Emma B. Quimby, Lot, Woodlawn $100.00 

Frank W. Hoit, Lot, Mt. Hope 75.00 

Daniel Beach, Lot, Mt. Hope 100.00 

Augustine B. Conant, Lot, Woodlawn . . . 100.00 

Lulu L. Clark, Lot, Mt. Hope 75.00 

Charles L. Clark, Lot, Mt. Hope . 75.00 

Received Interest : 

Athol Savings $26.26 

North Middlesex Savings 161.36 

Worcester North Savings 50.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 37.50 

Hudson Savings 60.00 

Marlboro Savings 56.25 

Maynard Trust 80.62 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

East Cambridge Savings 50.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 44.00 

Suffolk Savings 60.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 7.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 45.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 45.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 9.00 

Home Savings 20.00 

Central Savings 22.50 



$44,595.57 



$525.00 



—132— 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 52.13 

West & South Water Bonds 78.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 3.75 

Goodnovir Fund 20.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings, (income) 123.23 

Assabet Inst. Savings, (income) 37.43 

Assabet Inst. Savings 4.27 



$1,133.80 

$46,254.37 
Balance December 31, 1938: 

Assabet Inst. Savings $1,525.79 

Athol Savings 1,050.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Central Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 250.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 300.00 

Charlestov^n Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Home Savings 1,000.00 

Hudson Savings 2,400.00 

Marlboro Savings 2,200.00 

Maynard Trust Co. 3,228.96 

Middlesex Inst. Savings, (income) 3,253.17 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,475.00 

North Middlesex Savings 6,454.00 

Suffolk Savings i 3,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,200.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 779.27 

Assabet Inst. Savings 300.00 

West & South Water Bonds 1,800.00 

$44,716.19 

Transfer to Town Account 1,538.18 



S46.254.37 



Note: West and South Water Bond, redeemed, 
funds deposited in the Marlboro Savings Bank. 
($300.00) 



—IBS- 
ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1938: 

Principal Fund $25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 953.17 



Received Interest : 

Athol Sa^dng-s $50.00 

Amhere^t Savings . 55.00 

Worcester North Savings 25.00 

North Middlesex Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 60.00 

Lawrence Savings 50.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 50.00 

Marlboro Savings 60,00 

Waltham Savings 50.00 

East Cambridge Savings 5000 

Andover Savings 41.67 

Charlestown Five Gent Savings .... 60.00 

Lowell Inst. Savings 45.00 

Hudson Savings 35.13 

North Middlesex Savings, (income) .42 



Balance December 31, 1938: 

Amherst Savings . . . 

Andover Savings 

Athol Savings . . 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . . 

East Cambridge Savings 

Hudson Savings, (income) 

Lawrence Savings 

Lowell Inst. Savings 

Marlboro Savings 

Middleses Inst. Savings 

North Middlesex Savings 

North Middlesex Savings, (income) 

Waltham Savings 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 

Worcester North Savings 



$25,953.17 



KJiJLj.Cji-l 




$26,635.39 


$2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 


' 


2,000.00 




2,000.00 




662.63 




2,000.00 




2,00000 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




160.76 




2,000.00 




2,000.00 




1,000.00 






$25,823.39 



—134— 
Paid Trustee's Orders for 1938 812.00 



$26,635.39 



WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938: 

Principal Fund $9,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 675.58 

Susan Agusta & Luther Conant Fund 1,000.00 

Hiram Hapgood Fund 20000 

Luke Tuttle Fund 200.00 

John W. Heald Fund 867.13 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 2,172.65 

Minnie Davis Fund 336.50 

Received Interest : 

West Shore R. R. Bond $40.00 

Massachusetts Savings 22.50 

City Inst. Savings 25.00 

Cambridge Savings 10.08 

Warren Inst. Savings 40.00 

Home Savings 2000 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings . . . 90.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 15.00 

Cambridge Savings (Hosmer) 65.66 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Heald) . . 26.21 

Maynard Trust Co. (income) 28.58 



Balance Dcember 31, 1938 : 

Cambridge Savings 

Cambridge Savings 

Charlestov^n Five Cent Saving^ 

City Inst. Savings 

Home Savings 

Massachusetts Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 



$14,451.86 



*J*JtJ,\JtJ 




$14,834.89 


$2,238.31 




336.50 




3,000.00 




1,000.00 




1,000.00 




1,00000 




893.34 




1,000.00 





—135— 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Maynard Trust Co 400.00 

Maynard Trust Co. (income) 534.83 

West Shore R. R. Bond 1,000.00 



114,402.98 

Transfer to Town Account 431.91 



$14,834.89 



GEORGIA E- WHITNEY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938: 

Principal Fund $10,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 137.31 



Received to Fund 



$10,137.31 



Bequest (26th, item) 2,000.00 

Received Interest : 

North Middlesex Savings $50.00 

Hudson Savings 12.50 

Marlboro Savings 90.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (income) .... 3.39 

Lexington Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 30.00 

235.89 



$12,373.20 



Balance December 31, 1938 : 

Hudson Savings $1,000.00 

Lexington Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 3,000-00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (income) .... 293.20 

$12,293.20 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1938 80.00 

$12,373.20 



—136— 

LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1938 : 

To Balance |1,489.75 

Received Interest: 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... §3.22 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 8.37 

Massachusetts Savings 20.26 

Warren Inst. Savings 1.95 

33-80 

$1,523.55 

Balance December 31, 1938: 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... ?1 10.45 • 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 285.56 

Massachusetts Savings 1,003.57 

Warren Inst. Savings 98.97 

81,498,55 

Transfer to Town Account 25.00 

Sl,523.55 

■ ■ > 

CEMETERY SURPLUS FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938 : 
To Balance $1,194.83 

Received Interest : 
Assabet Inst. Savings $30.04 30.04 

11,224.87 
Balance December 31, 1938: 

Assabet Inst. Savings $1,173-52 

Transfer to Town Account 51.35 

$1,224.87 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938 : 
To Balance $564.81 

Received Interest: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings $17,06 17.06 

$581.87 
Balance December 31, 1938: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings $581.87 



—137— 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1938: 

Principal Fund $1,185.00 

Unexpended Balance 55.38 

Sl,240.38 

Received to Fund : 

Company Salaries S230.00 

;x Inst. Savings (interest) .. 3846 

268.46 



11,508.84 
Balance December 31, 1938 : 

Middlesex Inst. Savings $1,477.34 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1938 31.50 

$1,508.84 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



—138— 
Elizabeth White Fund 



January 7, 1939 

The Trustees have signed orders to the Treasurer for eight 
hundred twelve dollars ($812.00) for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1938. 

These orders have been given to assist v^orthy citizens of 
Acton who have met with unavoidable misfortunes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CLARA SAWYER, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 

Trustees of the 
Elizabeth White Fund. 



■139- 



DEDICATION 



Memorial Chapel in Woodlawn Cemetery 
Acton, Massachusetts, Jwae 19, 1938 




Dedicatory Service in the Chapel at 3 o'clock 

William E. Zeuch, Organist 

Temple Quartette 
A. A. Gruhn, First Tenor Franklin G. Field, Baritone 

George Wheeler, Second Tenor A. Cameron Steele, Ba^so 

PROGRAM 
Organ Prelude 

Invocation Rev. Arthur H. Wilde, Baptist Church, West Acton 

Quartette — 'The Lord's Prayer" 

Presentation of Chapel Mr. Amos L. Taylor for the Trustees 

Acceptance of Chapel 

Mr. Horace F. Tuttle for Cemetery Commissioners 



—140— 

Quartette — "Hymn to the Madonna" 

Address — Rev. Amel W. Whitwer, Congregational Church. 
South Acton. 

Quatrette — *'In the Garden" 

Address — Rev. Glenn W. Douglass, Congregational Church, 
Acton Center. 

Quartette — ''Largo" 

Benediction Rev. Norman L. Kellett, 

Universalist Church, South Acton 

Organ Postlude 

Acton Memorial Chapel erected in appreciation of the Comfort 
of the Gospel, and in the faith of life after death, and the glorious 
hope of immortality, a chapel for the free use of all who may 
desire it, for the observance of burial rites for those v^hose bodies 
are to be interred in Woodlawn. In memory of Varnum Tuttle, 
1823-1904, and Walter H. Whitney, 1849-1906. 

''He that doeth the will of God abideth forever," 

Given to the town of Acton by Georgia Etta Whitney and built 
under the direction of trustees, S. Albertie Watson and Amos L. 
Taylor. H. Thaxter Underwood, architect, and D. F. and W. G. 
Burns, Inc., contractors. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Department 



OF THE 






MASSACHUSETTS 







For the Year Ending December 31 



1938 



-142- 



School Committee 

Mr. Everett Montague, Chairman Term expires 1940 

Mrs. Leiand Howe Term expires 1939 

Mr. Samuel Knowlton Term expires 1941 

Mrs. Otis Reed Term expires 1941 

Mrs. Oliver Wood Term expires 1940 

Dr. Randall Woodworth Term expires 1939 

Meetings of the School Committee 

Regular meetings of the school committee shall be held the 1st 
Tuesday of each month in the high school, at 7 :30 P. M. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 

Walter F. Hall 
South Acton, Mass. . . .Office — High School Building. Tel. 110 

School Physician Dr. Ernest A. Mayell, Acton 

School Nurse Mrs. Genevieve Creeley, West Acton 

Attendance Officer . Leonard Godfrey, West Acton 

School Calendar 

January 3, 1939 — All schools reopened. 

February 17, 1939 — All schools close. 

February 27, 1939 — All schools reopen. 

April 14, 1939 — All schools close. 

April 24, 1939 — All schools reopen. 

June 9, 1939 — Grades I to VI, inclusive, close. 

June 21, 1939 — Graduation. 

June 23, 1939 — High school closes. 

September 6, 1939 — High school reopens. 

September 11, 1939 — Grades I to VI, inclusive, reopen. 

November 22, 1939 — All schools close at noon. 

November 27, 1939 — All schools reopen. 

December 21, 1939 — All schools close at noon. 

January 2, 1940 — All schools reopen. 

Legal Holidays 

January 1, February 22, April 19, May 30, July 4, first Mon- 
day of September, October 12, November 11, Thanksgiving Day, 



—143— 

Christmas Day (the day following, when any of those men- 
tioned occur on Sunday.) Arbor Day falls on the last Saturday 
in April and is not a legal holiday. Flag Day falls on June 14, 
and is not a legal holiday; it should be observed by proper ex- 
ercises by any school in session on that day. 

NO SCHOOL SIGNAL— -Time 7:L5 A.M. (all schools) 
Acton Center, West Acton, and South Acton 2-2-2-2 blasts 

SPECIAL SIGNAL— Time 11:45 A.M. (Grades 1-6) 
All Precincts 2-2-2-2 blasts 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 

1. Admission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until they 
are 5 years 8 months of age on or before September 1, except 
in the case of those children 5 years 6 months of age on Septem- 
ber 1 whose mental age and physical condition are satisfactory. 
Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first two weeks of 
school. All children entering for the first time must present 
birth and vaccination certificates. 

2 School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 514 hours in the ele- 
mentary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with sufficient 
recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to pupils 
except by the principals or persons delegated by the principals. 

3. School Busses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools they 
attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils must meet 
the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct themselves 

properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They must 
present a written excuse signed by parent or guardian for each 
absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a 

longer period in the high school. 



—144- 



6. Contagious Diseases 



State La\ys: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Section 15 

"A child from a household where a person is ill with smallpox, 
diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious or 
contagious disease, or from a household exposed to contagion 
from any such disease in another household, shall not attend 
any public school during such illness or exposure until the teach- 
er of the school has been furnished with a certificate from the 
local board of health, school physician or from the attending 
physician, stating that danger of conveying such disease by 
such child has passed." 



7 School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them by 

the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any form of 

school property, 

8. Fire Drill 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the 
elementary schools and at least once a month in the high school. 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
As of January 1, 1939 

Center School 

App. Graduate of 

Kai Kansanniva, Pi'in . . . . 1938 Fitchburg State College 

Ruth Berglind 1935 Lesley Normal School 

Charlotte Laird 1938 Fitchburg State College 

South School 

Julia McCarthy, Prin....l906 Fitchburg Normal 

Helen Appleby 1936 Lesley Normal School 

Cecelia Callanan 1938 Fitchburg State College 

Florence Merriam 1927 Fitchburg Normal 

West School 

Theodore Ehrhardt, Prin. 1938 Bridgewater State College 

Grace Callanan 1935 Fitchburg State College 

Elise Dickerman 1926 Fitchburg Normal 

Alice Feehan 1938 Fitchburg State Colloge 



Home Aadress 
Maynard 
South Acton 
South Acton 



South Acton 
Concord 

West Acton 
South Acton 



Whitman 
West Acton 
West Acton 
South Acton 



—145— 



High School 

Walter F. Hall, Prin 1935 

Richard Greenman, 

Asst. Prin 1935 

Kathrj^n Billman 1937 

Margaret Boornazian . . . 1929 

George Braman 1933 

Robert Dolan 1930 

Walter Holt 1928 

Henry Hopkinson 1930 

Marjorie Jones 1931 

Christine Leavitt 1937 

Mary Stolte 1931 

Marion Towne 1921 

Supervisors 

Frank Braman, Drawing 
Aiiene Hanson, Phys. Ed. 
John Moran, Music 



Harvard University 

Harvard University 
Univ. of New Hampshire 
Burdett College 
Wentworth Institute 
Clark University 
Dartmouth College 
Northeastern Law 
Simmons College 
Framingham State College 
Middlebury College 
Smith College 



New School of Design 
B. U. Sargent School 
N. E. Conservatory 



South Acton 

Concord 

WO'llaston 

Methuen 

Acton 
Marlboro 
East Acton 
West Acton 
South Acton 
Framingham 
South Acton 
Concord 



Acton 

South Acton 
Newton 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Voters of Acton: 

The School Committee herewith presents its report for the 
year 1938, together with the report of the Superintendent, which 
has been accepted by the committee. 

The work of the Committee for the year consisted of making 
numerous repairs to all buildings, consultation on policy of 
school system, appointment of new teachers, and approving all 
bills. 

By vote of the town, we were given the sum of $3,000. for 
repair work. This amount was spent as follows: 



High School Building 

In this building, the entire upper part of the rear wall above 
the windows was taken down and re-laid. The mortar was 
found to be very loose, and the wail leaking badly, causing severe 
damage to the interior walls of rooms and auditorium. The 
auditorium ceiling was badly stained by leakage through the 
floors in the toilets above. Waterproof, concrete floors were 
placed in these toilets. Auditorium walls and ceiling were 
painted as well as library and rooms above. A new motor- 
driven fan was placed above the chemical laboratory to draw 



— 146~-« 

off fumes from experiments. Certain roofing and flashing was 
done in connection with the new rear wall ; also all other leaks 
were taken care of. Numerous other small repairs were taken 
out of this amount, including weatherstripping and a storm drain 
from parking space to Charter road. 

Rebuilding rear brick wall down to the top of 
windows and laying waterproof concrete floors 

in two toilets over the auditorium $483.00 

Repairing leaks in roof and new flashing on 

new wall 287.45 

Carpenter labor on new floors and pilasters in 

auditorium 168.85 

Motor-driven fan in laboratory ventilator to re- 
move gases 140.00 

Painting auditorium and other walls in school . . 120.00 

Weatherstripping 50.00 

Drain from parking space to Charter Road .... 26.00 

Plumbing 25.95 

Electric wiring 30.27 

Materials of construction 94.23 



$1,425.75 

Elementary Schools 
South School 

The largest item, of expense in this building was the installa- 
tion of a new steam heating plant, and extra radiators. To date 
the new plant has maintained proper temperature and saved 
fuel. New gutters were placed on building, storm porch on rear 
door, and plastering and painting on the inside, including black- 
boards. 

New steam boiler and radiator $573.31 

New gutters 65.00 

Interior Plastering . 46.30 

Interior Painting 30.00 

Blackboards 18.41 

Carpenter Labor 11.20 

Materials .... .... 4.72 

$748.94 



—147— 

West School 

The repairs in this building were smaller than the others. 
The largest item was building a storm porch at the rear base- 
ment door, and laying a drain under the basement floor to take 
care of the rain water that came in from the front basement 
walL Basement walls were painted with white water paint. 
Miscellaneous other small items in plumbing, heating and wiring 
were done: 

Basement, drain, storm porch, painting base- 
ment walls $154.34 

Heating plant 35.79 

Gutters, etc 86.48 

Interior painting . . 15.00 

Electrical work 18.37 

Blackboards 18.39 

Plumbing . 1.08 

Materials 10.66 

$340.11 

Center School 

The largest item of expenditure in this building was interior 
painting; gutters, and repairs to plumbing. 

Painting $247.00 

Plastering 23.55 

Plumbing 40.00 

Gutters 86.48 

Blackboards . 18.39 

Electrical work ..... 15.68 

Carpenter labor . , 25.00 

Materials 27.34 

$483.44 

Summary 

High School $1,425.75 

South School 748.94 

West School 340.11 

Center School 483.44 

Total $2,998.24 

Unexpended Balance : . 1.76 

Total . . . $3,000,00 



—148— 

In December we let a contract for building a brick tool hou&e 
in the rear of the parking space at the high school, where we 
will store the gasoline-driven lawn mower, along with other 
miscellaneous tools used in the upkeep of the grounds, and 
storage of inflammables. We recommend that the exterior of 
the elementary schools be painted this year; the funds to come 
out of our regular appropriation. 

At the South School we had erected a new chain-link fence, i 
partly along one side adjacent to the Sheehan property; the 
cost of same coming out of our regular repair appropriation. 

The janitor service in all schools is now very satisfactory. 
The men holding these positions have made many repairs and 
maintained the buildings in a very good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT N. MONTAGUE, 

Chairman. 



COMPARISON OF COSTS FOR OPERATING 
ACTON SCHOOLS 

Mass. School Fund 1938 1937 1936 1935 

Part I $4,066.00 $3,990.00 $3,886.00 $4,031.00 

State Wards 796.38 866.03 531.72 525.58 

$4,862.38 $4,856.03 $4,417.72 $4,556.58 

Out-of-Town Tuition *2,555.81 2,335.58 2,188.66 2,615.37 

$7,418.19 $7,191.61 $6,606.38 $7,171.95 

Expended from Appropriation 47,098.63 45,994.58 45,998.26 43,498.72 

Net Cost to Town $39,680.44 $38,802.97 $39,391.88 $36,326.77 

Appropriation 47,100.00 46,000.00 46,000.00 43,500.00 

Special Appropriation 3,000.00 1,425.22 

* Approximate amount. Any discrepancy between this amount and that in 
treasurer's report is due to the fact that only money received for tuition i 

for the year 1938 is included here. I 



__149— 
Budget Proposed for 1939 



Items 1938 1939 
lv-2. School committee, Supt., Cen- 
sus, Attendance, Expenses . . $2,350.00 $2,500.00 
3 Supervisors 1,600.00 1,700.00 

4. Principals' Salaries: 

High 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Elementary . . 3,600.00 3,600.00 

5. Teachers' Salaries: 

High 15,600.00 15,400.00 

Elementary 8,000.00 7,500.00 

6. Textbooks: 

High . 400.00 400.00 

Elementary 30000 300.00 

7. Stationery and Supplies: 

High 800.00 800.00 

Elementary 400.00 400.00 

8. Janitors: 

High 1,350.00 1,350.00 

Elementary 2,084.00 2,150.00 

9. Fuel: 

High 800.00 800.00 

Elementary 1,10000 1,000.00 

10. Miscellaneous, Power, Janitors' 
Supplies: 

High 550.00 550.00 

Elementary 300.00 300.00 

11. Repairs: 

High 350.00 700.00 

Elementary .. 350.00 700.00 

12. Libraries 50.00 50.00 

13 Health 250.00 250.00 

14. Transportation 5,500.00 5,500.00 

15. Sundries 62.00 50.00 

16.-17, Vocational, Evening Schools 

Tuition 304.00 



S47,100.00 $47,000.00 



—ISO- 
SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR SUPPORT FOR 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1938 



General Control 

Salary and Expenses of Superintendent $2,436.20 

. . i. 

Expenses of Instruction 
Salaries of Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals : 

Supervisors $1,623.75 

Principal of High School 1,000.08 

Principals of Elementary Schools .... 3,460.00 

High School Teachers 15,114.56 

Elementary Teachers 7,48000 

?28,678.39 



High School Textbooks 350.22 

Elementary Textbooks 343.37 

High School Stationery and SuppHes . 1,035.87 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies . . 414.06 



$2,143.52 



Expenses of Operation 

High School : 

Wages of Janitor $1,366.25 

Fuel 845.10 

Miscellaneous 616.17 

$2,827.52 

Elementary: South West Center Total 

Wages of Janitor .. $722.00 8708.70 S646.40 $2,077.10 

Fuel 368.40 248-89 318.35 935.64 

Miscellaneous 126.01 134.04 92.93 352.98 



$1,216.41 $1,091.63 $1,057.68 $3,365.72 

Total Expenses of Operation $6,193.24 

Maintenance and Repairs 

High School $820.59 

Elementary: South West Center Total 

$248.04 S107.15 $241.13 $596.32 

Total Maintenance and Repairs $1,416.91 



•—151— 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health ... $201-75 

Libraries 54.09 

Transportation 5,500.00 

Vocational Education 301.28 

Miscellaneous 83.25 

New Equipment 90.00 

16,230.37 

Total Expended 47,098.63 

Unexpended Balance 1.37 

$47,100.00 
Special Appropriation for. Repairs : 

High School $1,425.75 

Elementary Schools 1,572.49 

Total Special Appropriation Expended $2,998.24 

Unexpended Balance 1.76 



$3,000.00 



PAID SUPPORT FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1938 



Gen-eral Control 

Superintendent, Salary $2,049.92 

Secretary 113.64 

OfRce Expenses : 

Yawman & Erbe, file folders $3-50 

• McGraw Hill Publishing Co., office book 2.53 

City of Providence, professional book 1.11 

Wright & Potter, account blanks 5.17 

So. Acton Post Office, stamps, envelopes 40.62 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co 85.64 

Murphy & Snyder, cards 27.55 

Geo. Richardson, attendance officer . . . 20.00 
Houghton Mifflin, professional book . 2.40 
Charles Scribner's Sons Co., prof, book -70 
National Educators Society, index sys- 
tem 14.25 



—152— 

Hobbs & Warren, account book 4.17 

Edward Conant, census . 35.00 

Leonard Godfrey, attendance officer . . 15,00 

Walter Hall, film expense 15.00 

$272.64 



Total General Control $2,436.20 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisor's Salary, Drawing $558.75 

Supervisor's Salary, Music 530.00 

Supervisor's Salary, Physical Education 535.00 

$1,623.75 

Principal's Salary, High School $1,000.08 

High School Teachers' Salaries : 

Kathryn Billman $1,12000 

Margaret Boornazian 1,500.00 

George Braman 1,035.00 

Robert Dolan 1,470.00 

Richard Greenman 1,580.00 

Walter Holt 1,800.00 

Henry Hopkinson 1,695.00 

Marjorie Jones 1,154.56 

Christine Leavitt 1,020.00 

Mary Stolte 1,300.00 

. Marion Towne . 1,420.00 

Louise Price, substitute 5.00 

Stannard Sylvia, substitute 15.00 

$15,114.56 

Principals' Salaries, Elementary: 

Theodore Ehrhardt 400.00 

Kal Kansanniva 400.00 

Julia McCarthy 1,39000 

Raymond Nickerson 630.00 

Charles Whitcomb 630.00 

Martha Middleton, substitute 10.00 

3,460.00 



—153— 



Elementary Teachers' Salaries: 

Helen Appleby 820.00 

Ruth Berglind 920.00 

Cecelia Callanan 595.00 

Grace Callanan 920.00 

Elise Dickerman 1,200.00 

Kathleen Feehan 165.00 

Jessie Kinnevan 660.00 

Charlotte Laird . 320.00 

Florence Merriam 1,250.00 

Gertrude Puhakka 630.00 

High School Textbooks 

Allyn & Bacon $1.31 

American Book Company , 5.04 

Bruce Publishing Company . 1.31 

Chemical Rubber Company 3.55 

Circle Book Company 2.00 

Dura Binding Company 33.18 

Ginn & Company 126.65 

Harper & Brothers 2.26 

D, C. Heath & Company 35.39 

Houghton Mifflin Company 2.40 

The Macmillan Company 111.78 

Orange Judd Publishing Company ..... 3.35 

Bessie N. Page 2-50 

Prentice-Hall Inc 1.65 

Charles Scribner's Sons Company 1.40 

Silver Burdett Company 13.95 

Yawman & Erbe 2.50 

Elementary Textbooks 

American Book Company $3.62 

Edward E. Babb & Company, Inc 21.04 

Milton Bradley Company 2.15 

Dura Binding Company 33.19 

Ginn & Company 3.15 

Houghton MiffHn Company 3.60 

Little, Brown & Company 1-34 



$7,480.00 



$350.22 



-154- 



Lyons & Carnahan . .54 

The Macmillan Company 89.20 

Charles E. Merrill Company 11.60 

Benjamin H. Sanborn & Company 1.17 

Scott, Foresman & Company 149.13 

Charles Scribner's Sons Company 18.49 

Silver Burdett & Company 5.15 

High School Stationery & Supplies 

Acton Motor Company, motor for Manual 

Arts 15.00 

A. B. Dick Company, stencils, ink 32.75 

A. W. Davis Company, Manual Arts .... 11.50 
Edward E. Babb & Company, paper, 

supplies 66.36 

Brodhead-Garrett Company, Manual Arts 225.63 

C. A. Gregory Company, tests 1.43 

C. C. Birchard & Company, music 33.71 

Central Scientific Company, lab. supplies 30.89 

Co-operative Test Service 2.50 

Deltas Manufacturing Company, Manual 

Arts 3.90 

Division of Teaching Aids, film service . 10.00 

Horace Partridge Company, manuals . . . 2.75 

J. L. Hammett Company, paper supplies 88.65 

H. J. Dowd Company, scotch tape 2.70 

James W. Brine Co., Inc., scorebook, 

sports material 62.87 

MacPherson's Hardware, solder iron . . . 6.85 
Milton Bradley Company, drawing sup- 
plies 99.64 

Murphy & Snyder, lab, paper 6.75 

National Broadcasting Company, music 

pamphlets .60 

Noble & Noble Inc., pamphlets 5.77 

Parker Hardware Company, Manual Arts 19.37 

Wm. P- Proctor Company, Manual Arts . 32.11 

Roy I. Gottschald, music 8.30 

Royal Typewriter Company, typewriters 95.00 

South Acton Department Store 1.00 



$343.37 



—155— 

Frank Sanderson, cardholders .80 

The Town Shop, exhibition material .... 1.70 

Simon Taylor, lab. suppHes 1.49 

World Book Company, tests 9.66 

Henry Wolkins Company, paper, supplies 39.98 

W. E. Aubuchon Company, fire pot 8.39 

Visual Education Service, projector .... 116.25 

Yawman & Erbe, filing material 1-57 

$1,035.87 

Elementary Stationery & Supplies 

Edward E. Babb & Company, Inc., paper, 

supplies 52.53 

Bureau of Publications, tests .50 

James W. Brine Company, Inc., bats, mit 16.77 

D. E. Boatman, supplies 2.82 

Milton Bradley Company, drawing sup- 
plies 100.18 

J. L. Hammett Company, paper, supplies 94.42 
H. J. Dowd Company, Inc., scotch tape . . 2.70 
Parker Hardware Company, supplies, ex- 
hibition material 42.54 

Wm. P. Proctor & Company, supplies . . . 21.35 
Row, Peterson & Company, pamphlets . . 4.65 
South Acton Department Store, baseballs 2.00 
Henry S. Wolkins Company, paper, sup- 
plies 39.98 

World Book Company, tests 33.62 

— $414.06 

High School Operating Expense 

Daniel MacDougall, Janitor $1,366.25 

Fuel 845.10 

Miscellaneous : 

Acton Pharmacy, cresol $6.65 

Acton Motor Co., grease, gas, valve . . . 11.25 

American Brush Co-, brushes 17.51 

A. P. W. Paper Co., towels, toilet paper 26.50 

Boston Edison Co 318.55 

Edward E. Babb &I Co., Inc., pails, 

thermometers 14.80 



—156— 

C. B. Dolge Co., ban 

A. W- Davis Co., paint, hoe, rake, etc. 

Fuller Brush Co., brush 

Leonard Godfrey, labor 

J. L. Hammett Co., chamois 

William Horner, window spray, soap, 

wax 

The Holmerden Co., disinfectant, drain 

solvent 

Geo. T. Johnson, disinfectant 

Masury- Young, oil, mops 

Parkr Hardware, keys, dry cells 

Wm- P. Proctor Co., lime 

Porter Cable Machine Co., sand belts . 

Geo. H. Reed, fertilizer 

T. F. Parker, keys 

Standard Cotton Goods Co., wiping 

cloths 

State Prison Colony, brushes 

Strong's Market, bon ami, draino .... 
West Disinfecting Co., soap, filpor .... 
West & South Water Supply District . 



6.00 
37.02 

1.44 
38.00 

3.04 

9.60 



12.75 


1.50 


27.24 


3.85 


.50 


3.43 


3.00 


.25 


7.59 


12.43 


2.66 


14.15 


36.46 


<5Jfi1fi 17 





Total High School Operating Expense . $2,827-52 



Elementary Operating Expense 

South West Center 

Janitors S722.00 ^708.70 |646.40 

Fuel 368.40 248.89 318.35 

Miscellaneous 

South West Center 

Boston Edison $37-71 $23.65 $10.26 

Masury- Young, oil . . 9.09 9.08 9.07 
West Disinfecting Co., 

soap, filpor 4-73 4.71 4.71 

Edward E. Babb & 

Co., baskets 7.48 11.31 7.46 



Total 
;2.077.10 
935.64 



— 157-- 

South West Center 



The Holmerden Co., 




J 




disinfectant, drain 








solvent 


4.25 


4.25 


4.25 


Wilham Horner, soap, 








wax 


2.75 


2.75 


2.75 


American Brush Co., 




brushes 


5.12 


5.09 


5.09 


Geo. H. Reed, rake, 




fertihzer 


.75 


3.00 


3.07 


A. W. Davis Co., rope. 








broom, bolts, ax . . . 




16.12 


.34 


Geo. Johnson, disin- 








fectant 


.50 


.50 


.50 


J. L. Hammett Co-, 




chamois 


1.02 


1.01 


1.01 


West & South Water 








Supply District . . . 


14.36 


13.38 


16.60 


A. P. W. Paper Co., 








towels 


8.84 
2.00 


8.83 
2.00 


8.83 


C. B- Dolge Co., ban . 


2.00 


Standard Cotton Goods 








Co., cloths 


2.53 


2.53 


2.53 


Porter-Cable Machine 








Co., sand belts .... 


1.14 


1.14 


1.14 


Acton Pharmacy, dis- 








infectant 


1.09 


1.08 


1.08 


State Prison Colony, 








brushes 


4.15 
1.40 


4.14 
2.37 


4.14 


T- F. Parker, dry cells 




Strong's Market, am- 








monia, sprayer . . . 




2.92 




Sears, Roebuck Co., 








lawn mower 




8.45 




R. R. Express Agency 




.73 




J. S. Moore, shovel, oil 


6.10 






Norman Livermore, 








lawn 


6.00 






Leonard Godfrey, lawn 




5.00 




Ralph Rogers, lawn . 






7.00 



—158— 

South West Center 
L. C. Hastings, lawn 5.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co. . .45 

Parker Hardware, rat 

traps .65 



^126.01 $13404 $92.93 352.98 

Total Elementary Operating Expense $3,365.72 

High School Maintenance and Repairs 

A. B. Dick Company, mimeograph $ .30 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., pipe covering .... 1.53 

American Brush Co-, mat 9.91 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co 6.54 

Carter Furniture Co., audit, window cov- 
erings 4.50 

David Clayton, refill extinguishers 4.00 

C. G. Conn Ltd., baton, stands 8.29 

Commonwealth of Mass., tuning piano . . . 3.00 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc., chair braces 21.16 

Donald Ferguson, electrical work 2-48 

Arthur Freese, plumbing 8.50 

Gledhill Bros., toilet seats 22.90 

Hayward Hardware Co., fire extinguisher 13.00 

William Holt, plumbing 38.13 

P. L. Herbert, ventilator . 29.50 

International Bus. Machines Corp., clock 2.18 

B. A. King, electrical work 47.89 

New England Brick Co., tool house 73-50 

New England Toro Co., gas tank 5.10 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber 6.81 

Reformatory for Women, flag 3.55 

H. J. Schnair, painting corridors ....... 74.00 

Albert E. Sims, plumbing 92.47 

J. D. Smith, tool house 298.00 

Typewriter Maintenance Co-, repairs ... 11.60 

West Disinfecting Co., filpor 29.25 

O. D. Wood, labor 2.50 

$820.59 



-159- 



Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 

South West Center 

Reformatory for Wo- 
men, flags S6.35 $6.33 $6.33 

A. W. Davis Co., nails, 

supplies 7.04 7.02 7.02 

Leonard Smith, tree 
stump removal .... 45.00 75.00 

Albert E. Sims, plumb- 
ing 4.25 1.30 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., 

material 21.98 .75 4230 

William B. Holt, plumb- 
ing f 2.30 2.96 

Daniel Sheehan, fence 18.20 

Clarence Braman, la- 
bor 1.00 

Arthur Freese, plumb- 
ing 6.50 

Parker Hardware, cells 4.05 

South Acton Coal & 
Lumber Co., materi- 
al 47.51 

Emile Noterman Jr., 

labor 2.00 

0. D. Wood, carpentry 17-80 

Hayward & Fullonton, 
sharpen lawn mow- 
ers 1.00 1.00 

Division of Blind, tune 

piano 3.00 

H. J. Schnair, painting 18.00 

Allen Chair Co., re- 
pairs 1.00 

J. L. Hammett Co., 

chamois 2.04 2.02 2.02 

Charles Boyer, clear- 
ing wood 3-25 

Francis Rahberg, clear- 

ino: wood 2.75 



•■o 





160 








South 


West 


Center 


John Paul, clearing 








wood 


3.00 






Francis O'Rourke, 




clearing wood 


3.00 






L. C. Hastings, labor 


5.00 






Henry Thatcher, labor 




2.00 




South Acton Dept. 








Store, curtain .... 




2.50 




The Town Shop, clock 


2.25 






W. J. Scanlon, labor 




2.00 




Gledhill Bros., toilet 








seats 




7-73 




Security Fence Com- 


_ 


pany, fence 


94.00 






N. H. Tennev, radia- 








tors 






26.45 


George Turner, paint- 




inor 




7.20 




**& 

Donald Ferguson, elec- 








trical work 


21.37 






C. H. Batchelder, flag 








pole 






50.00 


W. B. Case & Sons, 








burlap 






.75 



S248.04 S107.15 $241.13 
Total Elementary Maintenance and Repairs . . $596.32 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health : 

Middlesex Family Laundry ?l-75 

Dr. Ernest Mayell, examinations in 

high and elementary schools 200.00 

S201.75 



Libraries : 

Allyn & Bacon . .49 

Civic Education Service, weekly reviews 4.20 
Christian Science Publishing Co., Mon- 
itor 6.50 



—161— 

Graylord Bros. Inc., cards 4.55 

Herman Goldberger Agency, magazines 37.15 

Southern N. E. Book & Bible House 1.20 

$54.09 

Transportation : 

A- W. Davis $5,500.00 

Tuition : 

Middlesex County Training School, tu- 
ition of — 

Clayton Quimby 52.00 

Carmen Hickey 70.00 

City of Boston, tuition of — 

Francis Rahberg 94.36 

Daniel Sweeney 23.40 

City of Waltham, tuition of James 

Espie 61.52 

New Equipment: 

Austin D. MacRae Co., f rigidaire $90.00 

Miscellaneous : 

C. C. Cullinane, express 6.10 

Commissioner of Public Safety, boiler 

inspection 5.00 

Bon Marche, diploma ribbons ........ 6.00 

Murphy & Snyder, graduation pro- 
grams and tickets 8.50 

National Senior Honor Society, charter 

fee 500 

Vannah Lithograph Co., diplomas .... 52.65 

$83.25 

Total Expended $47,098.63 

Unexpended Balance 1.37 

$47,100.00 

Special Appropriation for Repairs 

High School : 

Air Conditioning and Engineering Co., 

fan and ventilator $140.00 

G. L. Forand, weatherstripping 50.00 



162 








E. P. Gates, irons 




4.75 
26.00 




Leonard Godfrey, drain 






M, D- Jones Co., plates for audit. 


win- 




dows 




16.00 

30.27 




B. A. King", electrical work 






Montgomery Hardware Co., bell 


pipe, 




etc 




28.14 
2.70 




Parker Hardware, material 






Wm. P. Proctor Co., nails, lumber 


.... 


42.64 




H. J, Schnair, painting auditorium 


, „ . , 


120100 




Albert E- Sims, plumbing 


.... 


25.95 




J. D. Smith, floors, brick wall .... 




483.00 

287.45 




Frank L. Weaver & Son, roof .... 


.... 




0. D. Wood, carpentry 


.... 


168.85 


$1,425.75 








Elementary: 


South 


West 


Center 




^11.20 






L. T. Fullonton, painting .... 






247.00 


Otto Fonsell, plastering 


46.30 




23.55 


Leonard Godfrey, drain 




154.34 




J- L. Hammett, blackboards . . 


18.41 


18.39 


18.39 


B. A. King, electrical work . . . 




18.37 


15.68 


Montgomery Hardware, bell 








pipe 




10.66 




Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber. . 


4.72 




27.84 


H. J. Schnair, painting 


30.00 


15.00 




Albert E. Sims, plumbing .... 




1.08 


40.00 


N. J. Tenney, heating 


573.31 


35.79 




^ Frank L. Weaver & Son ...... 


65.00 


86.48 


86.48 


0. D. Wood, carpentry 






25.00 




$748.94 


$340.11 


$483.44 


Total Elementary Special Repairs . 






$1,572.49 


Total Special Appropriation Expended 




2,998.24 


UnexBended Balance 






1.76 


V— / X ,1. V-* — - ». jv^ ^^ JL A \_.l \_^ \^V JL_^ C-V X %.^ X X V. V^ ♦••••»•••••• 









$3,000.00 



I 



—163.^ 
Report of the School Siiperintendeiit 



To the School Committee and Voters of Acton: 

I hereby submit my fourth annual report as superintendent 
of schools and high school principal. According to the practice 
of the two previous years, the reports of the special teachers of 
music, drawing, physical education, domestic and manual arts 
will be incorporated; the reports of the school physician and 
school nurse have been printed separately. 

I. School Costs 
1. Per Capita Costs 

The real per capita cost of the 497 pupils enrolled on October 

1, 1938 based upon $39,680.44, the estimated cost of/ schools in 
1938, exclusive of the special appropriations of $3,000.00, was 
$79.84 ; that for 1937, upon corrected net cost, $78.07. The in- 
creased cost was due to hurricane damage, trade school excess, 
DJid certain necessary repairs not anticipated at the beginning of 
1D38. ; 

2. Aliotment of School Dollar in 1938 

Cost of instruction (salaries, textbooks, supplies) ... $ .65 

Operation (janitors, fuel, expenses) .15 

Transportation .11 

General Control (supt., enforcement, expenses) .... . .05 

Repairs 03 

All others 01 

According to the best standardized iigures available, instruc- 
tion elsewhere runs from 70c to 75c on the dollar, operating 
expenses 10c to 12c, transportation 3c to 5c, repairs 2c to 3c. 
In other words, Acton is high in transportation and operating 
expenses, and fairly low in instruction costs. The geographical 
size of the town and the quality of bus service justify the cost 
of transportation; the antiquated elementary school buildings 
account in part for higher operating expenses. Yet such pro- 
portionately high costs must necessarily detract from other 
items on the budget which ought to be higher. 



—164— 

3. Maintenance and Repairs Proposed for 1939 

The work done in 1938 will probably be covered in some detail 
in the report of the school committee. That recommended for 
1939 is as follows: 

a. Elementary Schools: outside painting of two or three 
buildings ; ceiling in South School ; driveway at the South School ; 
improved lighting in all three schools ; base plugs and hot water 
attachments in all three schools; new window sashes ; insulation, 
especially at Center School, and weather-stripping; playground 
equipment. 

b. High School: Extension of gravelling back of school; 
several new shades ; outside painting of window sills and sashes ; 
further painting of floors in science laboratory and typewriting 
room ; sound proofing auditorium. To carry out several of these 
proposals and purchase of needed textbooks and supplies, $47,- 
000 should be appropriated. 

11. School Membership and Attendance 

1. Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1938 

Boys — Age 

Grade 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 21 Total 



1 


4 13 


1 




















18 


2 


7 


11 6 




















24 


3 




5 17 


2 




1 














25 


4 




5 


9 


3 


1 














18 


5 






4 


5 


8 1 














18 


6 








4 


12 3 


2 












21 


7 - 










2 10 


6 


2 


1 








21 


8 










8 


9 


7 










24 


9 












4 


9 


3 


1 






17 


10 














4 


8 


2 


1 


1 


16 


11 
















1 


12 


4 


1 


18 


12 


















2 


10 


3 


15 


13 




















1 


1 


2 



237 



__165— 

Girls — Age 

Grade 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 21 Tola! 



1 


7 


15 


2 




















24 


2 




7 


12 


1 


1 
















21 


3 






8 


11 


1 
















20 


4 








7 


13 4 
















24 


5 










5 13 


3 














21 


6 










5 


10 


2 1 












18 


7 












8 


10 6 












24 


8 














7 11 15 


1 










34 


9 














6 7 


4 










17 


10 














1 3 


7 


5 


1 


2 




19 


11 
















5 


14 


6 


1 




26 


12 


















4 


4 


1 


1 


10 


13 






















2 


- 


2 




260 


>tal 


























497 



The total membership for Grades 1-6 of 252 is six less than 
the average for the past twelve years; that of 245 for Gtades 
7-12 is one more. While the total school population remains 
fairly numerically stationery, many students move in and out 
each year. 

2. Percentage of Attendance 

From September 1937 through June 1938 the percentage of 
attendance in Grades 1-6 was 95.59; that for Grades 7-12, 95.39, 
both of which are good for a rural district and constitute' the 
best record for several years. In the same way, comparing the 
period September to December 1938 with similar periods in 
previous years, our tardy cases of 72 for Grades 1-6 and of 44 
for Grades 7-12 total less than previous records show. Much of 
this improvement is due to an excellent transportation service 
and careful check-up by school nurse and attendance officer. 
Probably our attendance and tardiness records ought to be even 
better, because students are often absent or late for insufficient 
reasons. Any ordinary rainy day should not keep so many from 
attending high school, to which 235 of the 245 are transported. 



—166— 
3. Teacher Loads in Grades 1-6 (October 1, 1938) 



Grade 


Center 


West 


South 


1 and 2 


21 


28 


38 


3 and 4 


15 


29 


43 


5 and 6 


21 


32 


25 



57 89 106 

The extra teachers at the West and South are justifiable. After 
a survey of the possibility of transferring certain pupils from 
the South to the Center School, the transfer did not appear ex- 
pedient. 

4. Holdin,^ Power of the High School 

The present senior class of 26 members is retaining 60% of 
its original number. The average retention for the last four 
years has been 59%. In the country as a whole, the average 
holding power in rural districts is 54% ; in urban districts over 
60%. 

III. Health and Physical Education 
1. General 

A full account of physical examinations and of testing and at- 
tention to eyes, ears, teeth, home visits, etc., is carefully treated 
in the reports of the school physician and school nurse. The 
superintendent feels very gi'ateful to Mrs- Creeley for her con- 
scientious service and excellent co-operation on all occasions. 
Doubtless, much credit is due her for helping to eliminate 
epidemics and thereby improving school attendance. 

As pointed out in the report of the school nurse, a cross- 
section survey by the State Department of Health would reveal 
the serious situation in regard to teeth. During the dental clinic 
service in the three fall months, 72 pupils received treatment. | 
Much remains to be done. Eye testing in April and December 
showed many defects. In certain cases glasses were secured for 
needy pupils. There is still need of assistance. Ear tests demon- 
strated several defects. 387 quarts of free milk were furnished 
pupils in Grades 1-6. 

To help in our corrective work the donations of local organi- 
zations were much appreciated. The resulting funds will be 
exhausted in June and must be replenished in September. Let 



—167- 

us bear in mind that the need for assistance noted above is 
particularly pressing in rural districts such as Acton, removed 

from the free clinics of large cities. 

2. Physical Education and Athletics 

Physical education and organized athletics are properly part 
of health education and should not be treated separately. 

a. Girls : 

The girls, fortunately, are under the same instructor in every 
grade. To be sure, during the past year, we have had three 
different lady instructors, all equally efficient. Miss Eleanor 
Jones, after excellent service, resigned in March to accept a 
much more lucrative position in Rhode Island. Her successor. 
Miss Eleanor Davenport, resigned in May to accept a position 
in Revere. She was followed by Miss Arlene Hanson, who like 
Miss Jones, graduated from Boston University — Sargent 
School, and has followed the same system. This includes in- 
formal exercises and games, health habits, and posture work in 
the early grades, and, in the upper grades, organized games in 
soft ball, baseball, volley ball, field hockey, and basketball, in 
addition to posture work and personal hygiene- The purpose has 
been the same as last year, namely, care of body and mind, cul- 
tivation of qualities of good character, desire to participate in 
games, and proper sportsmanship, whether the girls are winning 
or losing. 

In organized athletics, both inter-group and interschool, girls 
have participated proportionately much better than boys. Their 
improvement in physical education has been remarked upon by 
Dr. Mayell. 

b. Boys : 

Unfortunately, the boys in physical exercise in Grades 9-12 
have four different men instructors, all regular teachers, be- 
cause of curriculum requirements. The boys seem to enter into in- 
ter-group games with more interest than varsity contests. Health 
movies have been given to boys and girls, as well as health talks 
on the art of long-living, and the care of teeth, eyes, ears, etc. 
In varsity athletics, the boys played 12 games of basketball, 
winning a first place at Fitchburg; 12 games in baseball, but 
only four games in football, one of which was the new six-man 



168- 



type of play. In spite of the usual hard work by Mr. Dojan, ; 
victories were few. To help matters, Acton has entered new 
baseball and basketball leagues with schools of our own size 
and is now trying to form a six-man football league. This form 
of football team organization is rapidly gaining popularity in 
the smaller schools. At this point, the superintendent wishes to 
express the gratitude of the students to the town for taking over 
and maintaining Jones Memorial Field. 

In financing athletics, the high school athletic association 
continues to have difficulties and, in consequence, has adopted 
a policy of "pay-as-you-go." Good equipment, transportation, I 
and officials have been furnished, although losing teams do not \ 
draw a large ''gate." Hence, the biggest part of expenses must ? 
be met by various forms of subsidy, as the following table will 
show: 

A. A. Financial Statement 

1938 



Receipts 

Cash on Hand, Jan. 

1, 1938 

Gate 


$64.93 

118-97 

46.55 

59.57 

3.72 

28.51 

31.02 

15.97 

■ 40.01 


Expenditures 

Equipment 

Transportation 

Officials 

Janitor 

Miscellaneous . . . 
Cash on hand .... 


$123.64 

111-40 

82.00 


Dues 


12.00 


Magazine drive .... 

A. A. Dance 

Gifts (class, etc.) . . 
Movies 


18.57 
61.64 


Pin Sale 

Amateur Show .... 





$409.25 
Favorable Balance, January 1, 1939 . . 



$409.25 



$61.64 



This means $139.32 less receipts and $176.53 less expenditures 
than last j^ear. If the school committee had not helped by pay 
ing a bill of $62.24, there would have been a deficit. 



—169— 

3. Other Activities 

a. High School: 

TliGugh not part of the health program, it might be logical 
to add after organized athletcis a brief list of other student 
activities. The f olio v^ing organizations have continued to func- 
tion in the upper grades: an agricultural club for boys as a 
regular course, along with a 4~H club for girls; student coun- 
cil; several student assemblies and assemblies with outside 
speakers; the school magazine of good quality; class organiza- 
tions with their customary socials, plays, food sales, and card 
parties; and music clubs. There have been field trips to supple- 
ment science, domestic arts, manual arts, agriculture, and music. 
There were several outside essay contests, as well as the local 
history essay competition, in which Marjorie Nelson won first 
award and George Rifford second. 

In particular, more extended reference should be made to the 
following: The Senior Play, ''Happy-Go-Lucky," given in 
December under the direction of Mr- Greenman, was equally 
as successful as that in 1937. The three trips to the afternoon 
youth concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, also under 
Mr. Greenman's supervision, permitted 22 students on each 
occasion to listen to excellent music. 

The agricultural club has continued to function well. During 
a period of thirty weeks the boys will study and discuss care 
and feeding of poultry and cattle, repair and maintenance of 
farm equipment, farm management and accounting, the green- 
house industry, and bee culture. Twelve outside speakers, 
specialists in various fields, will visit the group. In brief, this 
class of 22 boys, under Mr. Frank Braman, is having a real 
opportunity to find out many valuable facts in farming, without 
any cost to them.selves or the school department. 

All of our activities and school news have received ample pub- 
licity through the columns of the ''Acton News," which has 
generously granted special front page space under a selected 
caption. Such publicity includes also the 4-H club activities and 
other happenings in each elementary school, where organized 
teams have competed even with the seventh and eighth grades. 



;j» -J 



—170— 

IV. Improvement of Instruction 

1. Supervision 

According to the best educational theory, 30% to 40% of a 
school superintendent's time should be devoted to supervision 
of instruction through class room visits, teacher conference: 
and faculty meetings. It has not been possible to visit classes 
sufficiently, but there have been numerous and regular faculty \ 
meetings of a professional nature. On the first Wednesday of 
each month, the superintendent meets the teachers of Grades 
7-12, and, on the first Thursday, the teachers of Grades 1-6. At 1 
these meetings, discussion of routine matters and individual i 
student cases are usually kept out. These are handled by con- 
ferences with individual teachers and by bulletins. On the other 
hand, a consistent series of topics bearing upon current pro- 
blems, selected by the teachers themselves, have been conducted 
under the guidance of a steering committee. Usually two 
teachers lead the discussion at each meeting in a professional 
manner- Bulletins summarize the chief points raised at one ses- 
sion and prepare for the next. Carefully chosen teachers' refer- 
ence library, steadily being augmented, is utilized. The experi- i 
ment appears to be working well, in that faculty meetings are 
far more interesting and profitable. 

2. Scholastic Achievement 

a. Eleynentary Schools : 

By the Metropolitan Achievement Tests given to Grades 1-8 
in May 1938 (similar to tests given in 1934, 1936, 1938), Grades 
1-5 appeared to be lower than standard in mental age, that is. 
lower in general intelligence than the grade level standard. On 
the other hand, only Grades 2, 3, and 4 were below average 
accomplishment in all subjects tested. In particular, reading 
ability was above the standard mean in every grade but Grade 

3. while the average in arithmetic and spelling was generally 
below. History and geography, on the whole, rated satisfac- 
torily. The low^ averages in arithmetic and spelling may be due 
in part to over attention given to reading or to difficult text- 
books. Already, reading, history, geography, and other basic 
textbooks had been standardized for all three schools. However, 
it was felt that easier revised arithmetics of the same text and 



—171— 

more effective spellers should be secured, with special emphasis 
upon drill in these two subjects. This has been done and im- 
provement is expected. 

So far as retarded children are concerned, the Worcester 
Clinic tested 46 doubtful cases. After several days of testing, 
they recommended that one pupil be placed in an institution, 
eight be put in special classes, five repeat the grade, and thirty- 
two continue where they were. It is interesting to note, however, 
that they called especial attention to 15 cases of eye defects, 24 
cases of teeth defect, and 11 cases of throat defects. If we have 
this proportion in 46 examined, we must have several other 
defective cases, as indicated above under health. These defects 
are, without doubt, an important factor in retarding particular 
pupils in their school work. To adjust matters, teachers 
throughout the system have access to confidential lists of in- 
telligence quotients and of eye, ear, and teeth defects, so that 
they may make due allowance in class work. Records are of no 
val/ue if kept in files without being used. 

b. High School: 

In the high school, achievement in scholarship has improved, 
if study habits and honor rolls are trustworthy evidence- Per- 
iods have been reduced in number and lengthened in time to 
provide supervised study. At present, 24 of the 31 periods per 
week are 51 minutes in length. 

The guidance program has been continued and extended 
through questionnaires, individual conferences, outside speakers, 
and visual education. A new Bel! and Howell silent motion pic- 
ture projector was purchased, along with the weekly service in 
educational films provided by Boston University. In addition, 
considerable material has been borrowed from museums near 
Boston. 

The library, under the supervision of Miss Stolte, has been 
steadily improved in organization and use. The student libra- 
1 rians are supervising very effectively. Many additions have 
I been made during the past year from a fund liberally provided. 
At least 40 students use the library daily for reference and 40 
books are drawn out weekly, in addition to books drawn for 
> school use from the town libraries. At present, there are be- 
tween 1,000 to 1,100 books, including 23 reference sets, 21 



—172— 

magazines, and the newspapers. We are still short of the stan- 
dard of 1300 books set by a national survey for high schools of 
this size. 

In May, the school formed a chapter in the National Honor 
Society, which provides emblems for the ranking upper 15 9r 
of the graduating class, and additions have been made to the 
scholarship fund, now amounting to $336.79. Last year, it was 
hoped that this fund could be increased under a trust arrange- 
ment, so that students might soon begin to use the interest for 
entering college. The need for contributions is still urgent, for 
we have many deserving and promising students who cannot 
continue their formal education after high school. As to recent 
graduates from the high school, 17 are attending institutions 
granting AB or BS degrees ; of the Class of 1938, 8 are attending 
higher institutions, 1 a preparatory' school, 4 are post gradu- 
ates, 15 are engaged in gainful occupations, 9 are at home, and 
2 married. 

c. Change of Ciirricuhim Needed : 

In spite of certain encouraging signs noted above, however, 
a large number of students are not book-minded nor particularly 
interested in the present program of studies, which comprises 
college preparatory (55 enrolled), business (45 enrolled), and 
general (42 enrolled.) This situation is not peculiar to Acton. ; 
Our offering is similar to that found in most New England 
rural districts, and the problem is the same. In fact, school 
men everywhere are wondering what the proper solution may 
be to adapt our educational plan in secondary schools to the 
numerous young girls and boys who, a generation ago. would 
have left school for work- We realize that attitude is more im- 
portant than facts ; that individuals differ in abilities, attitudes, 
and interests : that there must be found a way to help education- 
ally as many as possible. Under these circumstance^, we are 
striving hard to fit limited offerings to student use by the most 
interesting methods we can devise, with the object constantly in 
mind of gradually changing the curriculum. In this effort, we 
have for study the numerous experiments tried in various parts 
of the United States, some of which have worked out success- 
fully. 



—173— 

V. Domestic Arts (Girls) 

Domestic arts is offered only to girls in Grades 7-12 ; under 
a consolidated grade system; it might be started earlier. Miss 
Leavitt has suggested a course or two for high school boys, 
similar to courses elsewhere, because men have been compelled 
during the depression to work more at home. The outline of 
work attempted by the girls in Grades 7-12 does not differ from 
last year. The interest remains good and the enrollments satis- 
factory. Each year an attempt is made to render working con- 
ditions more efficient and up-to-date. For example, Grades 7 and 
8 have each been divided into two smaller groups. An electric 
sewing machine wa& added to the equipment, and a fine electric 
refrigerator and improved wiring installed by the school de- 
partment. The manual arts department added shelves for sew- 
ing boxes. In the future, it is hoped that a second modern gas 
range may replace the old one and another electric sewing 
machine may take the place of the remaining ancient treadle 
machines. 

Ill general, domestic arts courses attempt to prepare girls for 
ordinary household work, for healthy living, and for wholesome 
home relations. To further these purposes, certain girls are 
given one period out-of-doors for recreation or indoors for 
special problems in nutrition. 

An important daily project of this department is the manage- 
ment and operation of the noon luncheons. The' following finan- 
cial report for 1938 shows progress : 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1938 . . . .' $58.59 

Total sales for year . 1,934.95 

Expenses $1,963.35 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1939 30.19 



$1,993-54 $1,993.54 

The business for 1938 exceeded that of 1937 by $222.86 and 
permitted a profit for the year for replacements. These re- 
placements included trays and other equipment, after making 
a substantial gift to the athletic association. This does not mean 
that prices are too high nor the quality of the food, cheaper. In 
fact, the noon luncheons have never been more satisfactory and 
might V7ell compare with m.enus in any good high school. 



—174— 

VI. Manual Arts 

Lik domestic arts, manual arts is not taught below Grade 7. 
Three years ago, an attempt was made to introduce the general 
shop in all upper six grades. This idea has been changed at the 
request of the superintendent, so that the fundamental technique 
of woodworking or sloyd is practiced in Grades 7 and 8 and 
general shop in Grades 9-12. But even here the tendency is to 
prepare a boy in household mechanics for ordinary repair and 
handy work, rather than to teach him to perfect himself in the 
fundamentals of woodworking, metal working, electrical work, 
and shop practice. This year, an introductory course has been 
offered to upper grade boys in "motor mechanics, involving 
armature turning, ignition work, valve grinding, bearing work, 
turning, and wiring.'' Boys practice on an engine block and on 
their own cars. To further this work, the donation of a gaso- 
line or electric motor would be appreciated. 

In all this manual arts work, while equipment is fairly ade- 
quate, space is inadequate. Groups must be limited to twelve, 
thereby preventing a few boys from enrolling. Results are not 
yet satisfactory. This fact is to be regretted, because many boys 
in this type of community should develop far in hand work over 
a period of six years. However, certain boys after graduation 
have continued mechanical training in higher institutions or 
have gone into industrial work as a means of livelihood. 

VII. Drawing and Art 

Mr. Frank Braman teaches free hand drawing and elementary 
art in all the grades and mechanical drawing in Grades 10, 11. 
12 in connection with manual arts. Drawing is compulsory 
through Grade 8 and thereafter elective- One and one-half days 
are spent in the first six grades and two and one-half days in 
the upper six. While fewer students elect art than we had hoped, 
two recent graduates now attend art schools and a third is earn- 
ing money to continue art study later. 

In compliance with a wish expressed last year, there has been 
improvement in creative and original expression. More effort, 
also, has been expended on design and color. Several students 
have participated in large group projects in the lower grades I 
as a matter of correlation, and a few in the upper grades have ! 



—175— 

made interesting sketches for murals. Art should be constantly 
fostered for its aesthetic and utilitarian value. 

VIIL Music 

Music is the hand maid of art. Americans are naturally 
musical but need considerable training and direction. One year 
ago, after some discouragement, it was thought that beginning 
in real progress had been made but results did not bear out 
this belief. After Mr. Law's resignation in January, five can- 
didates were tested before the selection of Mr. Moran, a gradu- 
ate of the New England Conservatory, a student at Boston Uni- 
versity, and a teacher of public school experience. Since Mr. 
Moran's coming in April, the outlook in music is much brighter. 
He began his work by concentrating on vocal music and trained 
well large choruses for graduation in June. Since September, 
much time has been devoted to instrumental music in Grades 
7-12. To help matters, the school committee granted an extra 
day at the high school for special training in individual and 
group instrumental work. A survey showed that few students 
continue private lessons more than one year, that several of 
these no longer owned instruments in suitable condition, and 
that many others wanted to begin lessons but were financiialiy 
unable to do so. By special instruction, noted above, and by re- 
sourcefulness in gathering instruments, we already have pro- 
mise of a good orchestra. 

In outlining his vocal instruction, Mr. Moran indicated briefly 
his procedure as follows: 

"The first two years of school is devoted largely to rote sing; 
ing and physical activity leading to the development of the 
rhythmic sense- Syllables are introduced by rote toward the 
end of the second year. This technique is continued in the third 
grade for the first month and a half. Then the approach is 
gradually changed so that the songs are attacked directly 
through the syllables. A large number of songs are covered in 
these grades and two-part music is usually introduced in the 
second semester. The fifth and sixth grades should be com- 
paratively free from requiring help in attacking new songs. 
Two-part songs give way to three-part after the middle of the 
year." 



—176— 

Unfortunately, as is true in other towns, curriculum re- 
quirements restrict vocal music practice to one period per week 
above the sixth grade. We hope to improve this situation. 

IX. Changes in School Personnel 

1. Teachers 

There have been seven changes in teachers, two in connection 
with the special teachers already mentioned, and five in the 
elementary class room schools. Mr. Theodore Ehrhardt, who 
has received SB and Ed.M. degrees from Bridgewater State 
College, follow^ed Mr. Whitcomb at West Acton; Mr. Kal Kan- 
sanniva, a graduate of Fitchburg State College, followed Mr. 
Nickerson at the Center; Miss Charlotte Laird, a graduate of 
Fitchburg State College, succeeded Miss Puhakka at the Center, 
w^hen she resigned to be married ; Miss Cecelia Callanan, a grad- 
uate of Fitchburg State College, was transferred to the South 
School after the resignation of Miss Kinnevan; and Alice Fee- 
han, also a graduate from Fitchburg, became special teacher 
at the West School to fill the vacancy created by Miss Callanan's 
transfer. Special commendation should be made of the work of 
Miss Puhakka (Mrs. George Braman) who served well and 
efficiently at the Center School for seven years. Incidentally, 
our present force of twenty-two regular teachers contains 15 
college graduates with AB, BS, or higher degrees, six of whom 
are in the elementary schools. 

2. Janitors 

Mr. Benjamin Sawyer was elected janitor at the South School 
upon the resignation of Mr. Hastings. Mr. Hastings served long 
*and faithfully, gaining the affection and respect of all the child- 
ren w^ho knew him during his service at the school. At present, 
all the janitors are comparatively young and active men, loyal, 
and helpful. 
Conclusion : 

The enrollment in the Acton Schools, to be sure, is under 500, 
yet there are many interesting problems. In attempting to solve 
these and in conducting the regular routine work, the superin- 
tendent feels grateful for the continued kindness and co-opera- 
tion of the school committee, teachers, and townspeople. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. HALL 



—177— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Waiter F. Hall, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
South Acton, Mass. 
Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as school physician. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed in Novem- 
ber 1938. 

Diphtheria immunization and pre-school clinics were held in 
May at the South, West, and Center schools. 

On November 30, 1938, at the instigation of Doctor Moore of 
the State Department of Health, a conference was held in Con- 
cord with superintendents and school physicians of Acton and 
neighboring towns, taking part in discussing school health pro- 
blems, and procedure for school physicians. It was voted to 
hold these conferences at various times throughout the districts. 

We have been fortunate in not having any epidemics and our 
school population as a whole has been healthy. 

I wish to thank the superintendent, teachers, nurse, and 
townspeople for their co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



—ITS- 
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Walter F. Hall, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report as school nurse for the past 
year. The usual programs for the promotion of health and the 
prevention of illness were continued in the schools. The results 
were encouraging. Absences from school, when due to illness, 
were for the most part caused by colds and related conditions, 
and, with the exception of a few cases of pneumonia, not gener- 
ally serious. Several pupils were operated upon for appendicitis 
during the year. This is a condition which occurs not infre- 
quently in the high school age group. Both parents and young 
people must be taught the essential facts concerning pneumonia 
and appendicitis for their own protection, as in the past they 
have been informed of the dangers of diphtheria and tubercu- 
losis. 

Early in the school j^ear physical examinations were made 
by the school physician including all pupils from Grades 1-12. 
The examination of the entire school population is not carried 
out in all communities. Particular attention was paid to heart 
irregularities, enlarged tonsils, tooth decay, post cervical glands, 
and cases of malnutrition and postural defects. The latter cases 
were placed more properly in the hands of the physical educa- 
tion teacher for helpful training. In addition to this examination 
all pupils are weighed and measured. The statistics on the ex- 
aminations follow: 

Number of cases of heart irregularities 50 

Number of cases of enlarged tonsils 41 

Number of cases of dental decay 194 

Number of cases of post cervical glands 37 

Number of cases of evidence malnutrition 36 

Number of cases of poor posture 12 

Number of cases of skin infection 14 

A notice was sent to parents of pupils with remediable de- 
fects. The response indicates interest on the part of many par- 
ents with regards to the health of their children. 



—179— 

Much has been done and a great deal more can still be done 
for dental health through our school dental clinic. The clinic 
was held at the Center, South, and West Schools, over a three- 
month period. To stimulate interest, toothbrushes were avail- 
able to the elementary school pupils at a very small charge. This 
was possible through the Red Cross- The dental work completed 
was as follows: 

72 Finished cases (all fillings and extractions necessary) 

14 All work requested. 
9 All work possible. 
354 Amalgam fillings. 

13 Porcelain fillings. 
4 Cement fillings. 

86 Extractions of temporary teeth. 

14 Extractions of permanent teeth. 
88 Cleanings. 

The State Department of Health has offered to make a survey 
of our dental needs, taking special grades for study. Recommen- 
dations made by this survey will help us to develop the best 
type clinic. A much needed sterilizer for boiling dental in- 
struments was added to the equipment last/ year. This has done 
much for the efficiency of the clinic. Although much still re- 
mains to be done, we feel that an extremely necessary service 
has been well begun. 

An eye examination was given to all pupils by the teachers 
last September. Pupils whose tests results were poor were re- 
tested and rechecked and notices were sent to the parents of 
pupils whose vision was found to be faulty, and special examina- 
tion was indicated. In the high school, fifty-two were retested 
and notices sent to the parents of twelve. Seven of this group 
wore glasses not available at the time. In the elementary 
schools, eleven pupils were recommended for special examina- 
tions. The teacher can make adjustments for the child with 
poor vision or a hearing difficult when he has knowledge of 
the handicap. 

The 4A audiometer, used for the tests of hearing, was pro- 
vided by the State Department of Health- The tests were 
directed by a technician sent by the department. If the first 
scores were ^not high, the pupils were retested. Failure to make 
a good score might possibly be caused by enlarged tonsils or 



—ISO- 
adenoids, infection of the middle ear, foreign bodies in the ear, 
congestion due to a head cold, fatigue, or nervousness. Many 
of these cases will be treated and hearing may again become 
normal. 

The Middlesex County Hospital offers to pupils of high school 
age, as a part of their anti-tuberculosis program, the opportun- 
ity to have a tuberculin test and X-ray. This test will show any 
contact with tuberculosis, and further examinations are pro- 
vided for when necessary. This program has been carried on 
since 1924, when the state department initiated the Chadwick 
Clinics. Pupils have been acquainted with the causes and pre- | 
vention of tuberculosis through pamphlets which have been dis- 
tributed and movies shown in the school. 

Apart from clinics and examinations, time has been spent 
in the schools for inspections, first aid, and simple dressings, i 
The illness of any child which was not satisfactorily explained 
has been investigated, to aid in detection of a contagious disease. 
We are fortunate to have had very little contagious disease 
during the past year. I would ask parents to be aware of the 
possibility of a communicable disease when children are ill, thus 
avoiding exposure of others. The work of the school nurse for 
the year is as follows : 

Pupil Inspections 1721 ,m 

Simple dressings 509 " 

First Aid 12 

Pupils taken home ill 16 

Pupils taken to clinics 35 

Home Visits 196 

The nurse was present at all examinations by the school 
physician and gave as much time as was possible in assisting the 
school dentist. 

The teachers have at all times been most co-operative in help- 
ing to carry out a successful school health program. I am in- 
debted to you and to the faculty of the elementary schools and 
the high school for your support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



-181— 



Graduates of 1938 



Pauline Gertrude Aldred 
Mabel Beatrice Charter 
Alfred Whitney Cobleigh, Jr. 
Elizabeth Davis 
Anna Clifton Downey 
Edna Frances Downey 
Amelia Exenea Gagnon 
Leonard Albert Godfrey, Jr. 
Audrey Gertrude Grala 

** Irene Viola Granberg 
LeForest Edwin Gray 
^Florence Elizabeth Harriman 
Russell Davis Hayward 
Maddelon Phyllis Heckman 
Virginia Cairns Hodgen 

** Harry Merle Hollowell 

* Dexter Eugene Kelley 
Harold James Knight 
Edith Larsen 
Eleanor Joan Leveroni 

* Honor Students. 



Milton Roger Locke 
Edward Glenn MacDougall 
Kathryn Louise MacDougall 
Roderick Daniel MacDougall 

**Marion deSales McGuire 
*James Asaph Merriam 

**Robert Jones Montague 
Roger Warren Moore 
Marjorie Eleanor Nelson 
Joseph George Perry 

** Cynthia Louise Price 
George Adam Rifford, Jr. 

** Vincent Joseph Sheehan 
*John Irving Smith 
*Ralph Edward Spinney 
Frances Stuart 
Eleanor Lula Tate 
Robert Buchanan Taylor 
Viola Gertrude Thatcher 



** Honor Students and members of National Honor Society. 
Student Essays: 

First honors : Cynthia Price — 'The Cause and Prevention of 
Pneumonia." 

Second honors iVincent Sheehan — ''Is the Constitution Prac- 
tical?" 

Ralph Spinney — "The America I Want." 

Leonard Godfrey — "Does Propaganda Control Public Opin- 
ion?" 



Robert Montague — "Bleeding Democracies." 



—182— 

Awards During Year: m 

Marjorie Nelson, Carlos B. Clark Acton History Award, First 
prize. George Rifford: Carlos B. Clark Acton History 
Award, Second prize. Cynthia Price and James Merriam: 
American Legion Awards for best rank in Scholarship, 
Loyalty, and Achievement (Edwards-Quimby Post.) 

Vincent Sheehan : Washington-Franklin Medal for best record 
in American History (Mass. Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution) and medal on Massachusetts Constitution Ses- 
qui centennial Essay. 



INDEX 

Town Officers 3 

Warrant, Monday, March 6, 1939 9 

Report of Finance Committee 14 

Selectmen's Report . 17 

Welfare 20 

Old Age Assistance 21 

Aid to Dependent Children , 22 

Public Welfare 22 

Town Meeting, (Abstract) , March 14, 1938 23 

State Election, Nov. 8, 1938 34 

Special Town Meeting, (Abstract), 

Vov. 21, 1938 37 

Town Clerk's Report 39 

Births 40 

Marriages 42 

Deaths 45 

Non-resident Burials 47 

Dog Licenses 49 

Jury List (Revised) 1938 53 

Cemetery Commissioners 54 

Police 55 

Inspector of Animals 56 

Dog Officer • • • • • 56 

W.P.A. and Hurricane 57 

Moth Control 58 

Superintendent of Streets 58 

Assessors 59 

Tax Collector 60 

Fire Department . 64 

Forest Warden 64 

Tree Warden 65 

Superintendent of Town Forests 66 

Sponsor, W^P.A. Projects 66 

Chapter 90, Foreman's Report 67 

Work Relief Project, Foreman's Report 68 

Town Foreman's Report 69 

Board of Health 69 

Town Nurse 71 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 72 



Index (Continued) 



Middlesex County Extension 73 

Sealer's Report . 74 

Librarian's Report 75 

Books Added to Public Library 75 

Town Accountant 86 

Balance Sheet, 1938 123 

Treasurer's Rpeort 126 

Elizabeth White Fund 138 

Dedication of Memorial Chapel 139 

Schools : 

Organization 142 

Teachers 144 

School Committee 145 

Comparison of Costs 148 

Budget for 1939 . 149 

Summary of Expenses, 1938 150 

Support of School, (Detailed) ! . . 151 

Superintendent 163 

School Physician 177 

School Nurse 178 

Graduates, 1938 181 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




^"M^s^'om 






FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1939 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




^-AeTe^Ni. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1939 



STOUGHTON PRINTING COMPANY 

Stoughton, Mass. 



— 3— 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex ss 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the transaction 
of town affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit : 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the fourth day of March, 1940, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least 
before the fourth day of March. 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following 
town officers: Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, col- 
lector of taxes, one selectman for three years; one assessor 
for three years; one member of the board of public welfare 
for three years; four constables for one year; one cemetery 
commissioner for three years; two members of the school 



— 4— 

committee for three years; one member of the board of health 
for three years ; one trustee Memorial Library for three years, 
and a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock, noon, and close at 
8 o'clock p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Common- 
wealth to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, as 
aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton, on Monday, 
the eleventh day of March, at 7 :30 o'clock p. m., then and 
there to act on the following articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and deter- 
mine how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire 
department, or vote anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush 
fires and fix a price thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to insure the employees of the town or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town will 



—5— 

/ 

vote to raise and appropriate for the payment of premiums 
on all town officers' bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1940, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a 
public health nurse, and raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the maintenance of same. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 for the Work Relief Fund, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to accept from 
James Edward Kinsley, of Acton, Mass., conveyance to the 
town of the plot of land (known as the Hotel Property) in the 
village of Acton Center, as described in a conveyance by 
Ralph G. Crevier to James Edward Kinsley, by deed dated 
December 2, 1939, duly recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds, the same forever to be used as an addition to the 
Town Common, and subject to the express conditions set forth 
in his offer to said town, dated January 10, 1940, or in any 
way act thereon. To wit: That the frontage on Main Street 
and Concord Road be forever maintained as part of the Town 
Common, and that no structure be erected on this part of the 
plot, other than a suitable marker with the following inscrip- 
tion: "This plot of land presented to the Town of Acton by 
James Edward Kinsley, 1940." The remaining part of the 
plot may be sold by the Town by so voting at any Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by 
law, the townj's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, 
and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, 



— 6— 

as assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 
of the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G (6) 
(a) of the Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $300.00 for the maintenance of Jones 
Community Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
five hundred (500) dollars or any other sum to be used for 
clearing and grading a part of the ground in Mount Hope 
Cemetery damaged by the hurricane or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to repair and put in condition the 
South Acton fire alarm system or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred (100) dollars to install 
and maintain telephone service in the three grade schools for 
one year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to changing the names of certain streets as follows : 

Maple Avenue to Tuttle Street. 

School Street, West Acton, to Gates Road. 

Concord Street (from its present intersection with 

Parker Street to the Maynard line) to Parker Street. 
Concord Street (from Parker Street to the Concord line) 

to Pratt Road. 
Davis Terrace to Dudley Terrace. 

Article 20. To see what action the town shall take under 
the provisions of Chapter 403 of the Acts of 1936 to extend 
the terms workmen, laborers and mechanics to include other 
employees. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to close out the 
appropriation of $1,200 made for a truck for the highway 
department at the annual meeting March 14, 1938, to the 



— 7— 

Excess and Deficiency Account (surplus revenue) or do or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills 
for 1939, or do or act anything thereon. 

General Government $ 10.00 

Highway Department 11.02 

Public Welfare 243.22 



$264.24 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,500 for the building of two addi- 
tional rooms at the rear of the high school to provide dressing 
and shower rooms for use in the physical education program, 
such sum to be expended under the direction of the school 
committee ; or take any action thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,200.00 or any other sum for the 
suppression of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the care of shade trees or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) for the 
redemption of tax titles held by the town. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $230.00 for the use of the treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be 
reimbursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$600.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, 
or act anything thereon. 



— 8— 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time of 
said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the time of 
meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this thirty-first day of 
January, 1940. 



A true copy. Attest: 



Attest : 



JAMES E. KINSLEY 
RALPH W. PIPER 
RAYMOND F. DURKEE 

Selectmen of Acton 



MICHAEL FOLEY 

Constable of Acton 



— 9— 



Town Officers, 1939 



Moderator 
Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

Raymond F. Durkee Term expires 1940 

Ralph W. Piper Term expires 1941 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1942 

Town Clerk 
Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 
William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Carl C. Flint » Term expires 1940 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1941 

Henry L. Haynes Term expires 1942 

Collector of Taxes 
Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 
James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1940 

Raymond L. Hatch Term expires 1941 

Carl E. Backman Term expires 1942 

Constables 

George A. Braman Robert G. Willett 

Michael Foley Norman L. Perkins 



—10— 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Horace F. Tuttle . Term expires 1940 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1941 

Wendell F. Davis Term expires 1942 

School Committee 

Louisa N. Wood Term expires 1940 

Everett N. Montague Term expires 1940 

Evelyn K. Reed Term expires 1941 

Samuel E. Knowlton Term expires 1941 

Avis Howe Term expires 1942 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1942 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

Horace F. Tuttle , Term expires 1940 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1941 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1942 

Board of Health 

0. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1940 

Lillian E. Taylor Term expires 1941 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1942 

Agent of Board of Health 
Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1940 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1941 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1942 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

A. N. Hederstedt Term expires 1940 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1941 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1942 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1940 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1941 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1942 



—11— 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1940 

Charles E. Smith . Term expires 1941 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1942 



Appointments Made by Selectmen — 1939 

Executive Clerk 
Virginia Milbery 

Office : Town Hall. Hours : 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30; 

Board of Public Welfare, Monday evenings at 7:00. 

Finance Committee 
Murray Brown William T. Merriam 

Alfred W. Davis Webster S. Blanchard 

Alden C. Flagg Howard J. Billings 

Superintendent of Streets 
William C. Kazokas 

Town Accountant 
Howard L. Jones Term expires 1941 

Registrars of Voters 

Walter L. O'Neil Term expires 1940 

Arthur Lee Term expires 1941 

William B. Feely Term expires 1942 

Horace F. Tuttle Ex-Officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — James W. Coughlin 
Clerk — Arthur W. Wayne 
Inspector — Arthur F. Davis 



—12— 

Inspector — Paul G. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — George A. Murphy 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — S. E. Knowlton 
Deputy Inspector — Leo F. McCarthy 

Precinct II 
Warden — Clarence R. Bobbins 
Clerk — Grace J. Cullinane 
Inspector — Howard F. Jones 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — Reginald Stoney 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Frank A. Merriam 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph Lemoine 

Precinct III 
Warden — Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Peter Duggan 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Frank McDonald 
Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk — Daniel J. Hurley 
Deputy Inspector — Harry Holt 
Deputy Inspector — John J. Duggan 

Fire Engineeers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer— Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 
Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 
H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 
Arthur Eraser 



—13— 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Clare A. Milbery 

Superintendent of Town Forest 
Albert R. Jenks 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 
Bertram D. Hall Charles E. Smith 

George H. Reed 

Field Drivers 

Michael Foley Norman Perkins 

George A. Braman Robert G. Willett 

Superintendent of Moth Work 
James J. Knight 

Police Officers 
^Michael Foley, Chief 
George A. Braman Norman Perkins 

Robert G. Willett 
* Civil Service — Permanent 

Burial Agent 
Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 
Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 
Eden Cahill 

Public Weighers 

George H. Reed Alfred Davis, Jr. 

William Braman G. Hov^ard Reed 

A. W. Davis W. H. Francis Davis 

F. D. Harrington Thomas Hearon 

M. B. Ferber Fred Burke 

Philip Nev^ell Fred Stone 

Willard Houghton Albert S. Braman 

W. H. Soar Clarence E. Braman 



-14- 



Selectmen's Report 



We submit, herewith, the reports of the various depart- 
ments of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1939, 
also all of the actions under the different articles voted at the 
last annual Town Meeting and the Special Town Meeting. 

The Legislature did not appropriate any money for Chap- 
ter 90, road construction, for 1939 and 1940, therefore this 
board took no action under Articles 16 and 17 as voted at the 
last annual meeting. The Town will not appropriate any 
money for this work in 1940. 

This board traded for a new snov\^ plow and purchased 
another sand spreader to efficiently carry on the work of snow 
removal and sanding of the highways. 

This board recommends an appropriation for Work 
Relief for 1940, also an increased appropriation for street 
lighting in order to install additional street lights. 

We wish to thank the different officers and committees 
of the Town for carrying out their work in the different 
departments of the Town. 

We solicit the cooperation and advice of the citizens to 
improve the operation of Town business. 

JAMES E. KINSLEY 
RALPH W. PIPER 
RAYMOND F. DURKEE 

Selectmen of Acton 



—15— 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town 
Meeting, March 13, 1939 

Art. 1 To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

A motion, "That the salaries voted at this meeting 
and/or designated by the Board of Selectmen by authority 
of this meeting be the full and complete compensation for the 
respective officers in accomplishing the business of the town, 
and that all other sums received by the various officers, in 
pursuance of town business, unless specifically exempted by 
an Act of the General Court or a By-law of the town be 
accounted for and paid into the general funds of the town," 
did not prevail. 

Chose Waldo E. Whitcomb trustee of the Elizabeth White 
Fund for three years. 

Chose Charlotte Conant trustee of the Goodnow Fund 
for three years. 

Chose Clarence Frost trustee of the Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose H. Stuart MacGregor trustee of the West Acton 
Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
thousand dollars per annum and to allow an additional charge 
for expense of postage incurred in the collection of taxes. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Selectmen 
be three hundred dollars per annum and the other members 
two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted : That the salaries of the Assessors be nine hun- 



—16— 

dred dollars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned as 
they may determine. 

A motion that the salaries of the Assessors be four hun- 
dred and fifty dollars per annum, did not prevail. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars per 
annum and of the other members seventy-five dollars each per 
annum and that a member of the Board of Public Welfare 
shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assistance and that the 
expense of administering this assistance, such as necessary 
supplies, salary and traveling expense of said supervisor, 
shall not exceed the amount provided for this purpose by the 
Federal Government. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk, fifteen 
dollars and the other member ten dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen 
dollars for the annual meeting and ten dollars for special 
meetings. • 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Accountant be four 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Voted : To accept the several reports of town officers, 

Voted : That the Selectmen be commended for the stand 
they took on the purchase of the truck voted in 1938. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 



—17— 

mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

No action taken under this article. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will appro- 
priate to defray the necessary and usual expenses of the sev- 
eral departments of the town and determine how the same 
shall be raised. 

Under this article and other articles in the warrant it 
was voted to appropriate and raise by taxation for : 
Highways, General Maintenance: 

Villages $1,150.00 

Chapter 81 8,850.00 

Chapter 90 2,000.00 

Education 47,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,500.00 

Memorial Library, current expenses 1,000.00 

Memorial Library, branch service 300.00 

Memorial Library, books 200.00 

Hydrant Service 3,128.00 

General Government 6,500.00 

Buildings and Grounds 1,500.00 

Cemeteries ($150 from Land Fund) 1,450.00 

Military Aid 150.00 

State Aid 600.00 

Soldiers' Relief 2,500.00 

Police Department 2,500.00 

Board of Health 1,200.00 

Public Health Nurse, Salary 2,000.00 

Public Health Nurse, Expenses 200.00 

Welfare, Temporary Aid 6,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,000.00 

Tree Warden, care of trees 700.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Notes and Bonds 5,500.00 

Interest on notes and bonds 572.50 



—18— 

Interest on Revenue Loans 250.00 

Memorial Day 275,00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 

Gypsy Moth Work 1,200.00 

Liability Insurance 1,000.00 

Treasurer's, Collector's and Clerk's Bonds 253.00 

County Hospital, maintenance 994.23 

Fire Department, hose and equipment 500.00 

Redemption of tax titles 100.00 

Expense of Dog Officer 225.00 

Main Street, Improvement (Art. 16) 3,500.00 

School Street (Art. 17) 1,000.00 

Snow, Removal and Sanding 4,200.00 

Jones' Athletic Field 300.00 

Work Relief (Art. 19) 2,000.00 

Transfer from Machinery Fund to 

Machinery Account 700.00 

Cemeteries, to be raised 1,300.00 

Cemeteries, transfer from Land Fund 150.00 

Reserve Fund from Overlay Surplus Account. . . 1,500.00 

Unpaid Bills, 1938 (Art. 24) 1,263.70 

Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars to be expended under the direc- 
tion of a committee consisting of the Commander of the Isaac 
Davis Post, G. A. R., and the Commander and Finance Officer 
of Edwards-Quimby Post, American Legion. 

Art. 6. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire depart- 
ment or vote anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty- 
eight hundred dollars. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush 
fires and fix a price thereon. 



—19— 

Voted : To appropriate five hundred dollars for fighting 
brush fires and that the price for services and labor be fixed 
at fifty cents per hour for firemen, sixty cents per hour for 
Deputy Forest Warden and seventy-five cents per hour for the 
Forest Warden. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to insure the employees of the town 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of one thou- 
sand dollars. 

Art. 9. To see what amount of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the payment of premiums on all 
town officers' bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate two hundred and fifty- 
three dollars for the payment of premiums on all bonds of 
town officials. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1939 and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the town treasurer, with the approval of 
the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning January 1, 1939 and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse and raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the maintenance of same. 

Voted : To employ a public health nurse to be under the 
direction of the Board of Health and to appropriate two thou- 



—20— 

sand dollars for the salary of said nurse and two hundred 
dollars for expenses. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,200.00 or any other sum for the suppres- 
sion of brown tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of twelve hun- 
dred dollars for moth work. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the care of shade trees or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of seven hun- 
dred dollars for the care of shade trees. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of two hundred dollars for the redemption 
of tax titles held by the town. - 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred dollars for the redemption of tax titles held by the town. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $225 for the use of the treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reim- 
bursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for the improvement of Main Street, 
from the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton, said 
money to be used in conjunction with any money which may 
be allotted by the State or County, or both, for this purpose 
or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Voted : That the town raise and appropriate the sum of 
three thousand five hundred dollars for the continuance of 
the improvement of Main Street, from the Carlisle line to the 
State Road in East Acton, said sum or any portion thereof to 
be used in conjunction with any money which may be allotted 



—21— 

by the State or County, or both, for this purpose. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for the specific repairs and widen- 
ings of School Street, South Acton, said money to be used in 
conjunction with any money which may be allotted by the 
State or County, or both, for this purpose or take any other 
action in relation thereto. 

Voted : That the town raise and appropriate the sum of 
one thousand dollars for the specific repairs and widenings of 
School Street, South Acton, said sum or any portion thereof 
to be used in conjunction with any money which may be al- 
lotted by the State or County, or both, for this purpose. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of three hundred dollars for the mainten- 
ance of Jones Community Field, South Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of three hun- 
dred dollars for the maintenance of Jones Community Field, 
South Acton. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $10,000.00 for the Work Relief Fund or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two thou- 
sand (2000) dollars for a Work Relief Fund. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as 
required by law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, 
maintenance and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis 
Hospital as assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 111 of the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25G 
(6) (a) of the Acts of 1936 or take any action in relation 
thereto. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of nine hundred 
ninety-four and 23/100 dollars, to meet the assessment made 



—22— 

on the town for the purpose mentioned in this article. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money sufficient to rebuild that portion of 
road in West Acton, known as Central Street, beginning at 
its intersection with Massachusetts Avenue, so-called, thence 
northerly to a point formerly rebuilt near the residence of 
Millard J. Handley or take any action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $550.00 or any other sum to purchase 
new fire hose. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase additional equipment for 
fighting brush fires or act anything thereon. 

Acting under Articles 22 and 23 jointly, it was 
Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of five hun- 
dred dollars for the purchase of new hose and equipment for 
the fire department. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills for 
1938 or do or act anything thereon. 

General Government $459.30 

Buildings and Grounds ....... 94.70 

Fire Department 15.00 

Board of Health 85.27 

Town Nurse 26.74 

Highways 19.25 

Public Welfare 549.44 

Branch Library 10.00 

Dog Officer 4.00 



$1,263.70 



Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one thou- 
sand two hundred sixty-three and 70/100 dollars to pay the 
unpaid bills for 1938 specified in the article. 



—23— 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to transfer $700.00 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account and the 
purchase of a hone for the road department or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of seven hundred dollars 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account and to 
purchase a hone for the road department. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1,200.00 to purchase a truck for the 
Street Department or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to appoint a com- 
mittee composed of one veteran and one non-veteran from 
each of the three precincts of the town, to purchase the truck 
for the Street Department or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to accept the lay- 
out as made by the selectmen of a street in South Acton lead- 
ing Northwesterly from Main Street toward the Marlboro 
Branch railroad tracks a distance of approximately 200 feet 
to a point beyond the residence of L. Edward Laird. 

Voted : That the town accept as a town way, the laying 
out by the Selectmen of a street extending northwesterly from 
Main Street in South Acton a distance of approximately 200 
feet over land of Howard J. Billings land others to land now 
or formerly of L. Edward Laird and that said way be named 
Fletcher Court. 



—24— 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Special Town 
Meeting Held December 18, 1939 



Art. 1. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the use of the Welfare Depart- 
ment by borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or 
transfer from available funds. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate fifteen hundred (1500) 
dollars for the use of the Welfare Department by transferring 
said amount from the surplus revenue account. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the use of the Bureau of Old Age 
Assistance by borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 
or transfer from available funds. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate seven hundred (700) 
dollars for the use of the Bureau of Old Age Assistance by 
transferring said amount from the surplus revenue account. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will authorize payment of the 
bills of Dr. 0. L. Clark amounting to fifty-five (55) dollars and 
Lillian F. Taylor amounting to thirteen (13) dollars for spec- 
ial services rendered the Board of Health. 

Voted: To authorize the payment of the bills of Dr. 0. 
L. Clark amounting to $55.00 and the bill of Lillian F. Taylor 
amounting to $13.00 for special services rendered the Board 
of Health. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for Snow Removal by borrowing un- 
der Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer from available 
funds. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of five hun- 
dred (500) dollars for Snow Removal by transferring said 
amount from the surplus revenue account. 



—25- 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 

Whole number recorded 40 

Born in Acton 5 Native parentage 35 

Males 20 Foreign parentage 1 

Females 20 Mixed parentage 4 

Marriages 
Whole number recorded 50 

Residents of Acton .... 51 Residents of other places 49 

Deaths 
Whole number recorded 28 

Residents of Acton .... 27 Residents of other places 1 
Occurring in Acton .... 20 Occurring in other places 8 

Average age in years, 65 plus 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
Town Clerk. 



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—33— 



Deaths Registered in 1939 



Date 


Name 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Dys, 


Mar. 


25 


Allen, Eunice E. 


82 


7 


8 


Nov. 


9 


Alster, John 


76 






Dec. 


21 


Anderson, Martha Munson 


60 


5 


17 


Feb. 


10 


Barteaux, Maynard Wheelock 


60 


8 


1 


Sept. 


25 


Beach, Archie J. 


58 


6 


12 


Jan. 


15 


Curley, Thomas S. 


50 


. . 


• • 


Feb. 


12 


Evans, John Henry 


71 


9 


5 


Jan. 


30 


Green, Frederick W. 


80 


4 


20 


Sept. 


13 


Hammond, Ernest A. 


69 


4 


5 


Feb. 


6 


Howe, Madeleine 


58 


4 


22 


May 


9 


Johnson, August 


54 


• • 


20 


Jan. 


14 


Kilmartin, William T. 


62 


6 


7 


Aug. 


14 


Liese, Cora Louise 


48 


1 


20 


Dec. 


4 


Lothrop, Ellen Chapin 


89 


2 


22 


Dec. 


20 


McGovern, Mary Ann (Gallan) 


50 


6 


• • 


May 


28 


Nelson, John A. 


83 


3 


1 


May 


20 


Nickerson, Alice T. (Munroe) 


74 


6 


16 


July 


4 


Parker, Lucy Noyes 


79 


3 


25 


Apr. 


13 


Pederson, John 


65 


. . 


21 


Nov. 


22 


Prescott, Minnie Florence 


79 


8 


. . 


Dec. 


3 


Reid, Robert A., Jr. 


57 


6 


17 


Feb. 


22 


Roche, Bridget F. (McSheehy) 


79 


7 


23 


June 


12 


Shaw, Candace R. (Shore) 


53 


1 


24 


Mar. 


10 


Swift, Edwin Thomas 


65 


4 


25 


Sept. 


5 


Tripp, Horatio W. 


90 


1 


28 


Feb. 


23 


Turner, Harriet M. 


72 


6 


29 


Aug. 


2 


Victoria, Manuel C. 


70 


• • 


. . 






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-36— 



List of Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1939 



Allen, H. V $2.00 Caldwell, Margaret . . . 2.00 

Allen, W. Stuart 2.00 Carey, Lester 5.00 

Alley, Mrs. Ruth 2.00 Carlson, Christian . . . 5.00 

Anderson, Hilda 5.00 Carvelho, Manuel .... 2.00 

Avery, Lee 2.00 Chaffin, Nancy S 2.00 

Bacher, Helen 2.00 Charles, Will A 2.00 

Baker, James W 2.00 Charter, William 2.00 

Bancroft, Clesson A. . . 10.00 Christofferson, Allen . 2.00 

Barry, David A 2.00 Christofferson, Edwin . 2.00 

Beach, Flora A 2.00 Clapp, Geraldine 2.00 

Bean, Mrs. Lucy 5.00 Clark, 0. L 2.00 

Bean, Priscilla 5.00 Clifford, Florence H. . 2.00 

Bell, George 2.00 Cloutier, Joseph 2.00 

Benere, Antonia 2.00 Collins, Francis 5.00 

Best, Helen R 5.00 Conant, Charlotte 2.00 

Billings, Howard J. . . . 2.00 Condon, Katherine M. 2.00 

Blanchard, Hazel G. . . 2.00 Connolly, James H. . . . 2.00 

Boatman, Dewey E. . . 2.00 Conquest, Arlene and 

Bowen, Robert M 4.00 Gladys 2.00 

Bradbury, Rolfe 2.00 Cornwall, Paul C 2.00 

Bradley, John J 5.00 Costello, Timothy 2.00 

Bradley, Leo 4.00 Coughlin, Mary 2.00 

Braman, Dorothy .... 5.00 Creeley, Genevieve J. . . 2.00 

Braman, Frank S. . . . 2.00 Crosby, W. C 5.00 

Braman, George A. . . 2.00 Cullinane, C. C 2.00 

Brill, Fred E 2.00 Cunningham, Harold J. 2.00 

Brown, Arthur P 2.00 Curtis, Clinton S 4.00 

Buckley, John P 5.00 Dakin, Mrs. Emma M. 2.00 

Bundy, Lloyd 5.00 Davis, Charles E 7.00 

Butler, Mary K 2.00 Davis, Edith (Pine 

Byers, John B 2.00 Ledge Kennel) 25.00 

Byron, Thomas 2.00 Davis, Henry A. .... 2.00 

Cahill, William ...... 2.00 Davis, Warren A. & Son 5.00 

Caldwell, Hazel 2.00 Davis, Warren J 5.00 



—37— 



Davis, Wendell F. . . 


. 2.00 


Day, George ....... 


. 2.00 


Day, Harold E 


. 2.00 


DeSouza, Joseph .... 


. 2.00 


Diggs, Daniel 


. 5.00 


Donnelly, Dorothy . . 


. 2.00 


Downey, Chester M. . 


. 5.00 


Downey, Mary E. ... 


. 2.00 


Duggan, John J 


2.00 


Durkee, Raymond F. 


2.00 


Durkee, Sidney P. . . . 


2.00 


Edney, Charles F 


2.00 


Espie, James E. . . . . . 


2.00 


Farley, Charles J. . . . 


15.00 


Farquhar, Stuart . . . . 


2.00 


Fisher, Charles W. . . 


2.00 


Flagg, Alden C, Jr. . . 


2.00 


Flint, Carl 


2.00 


Flint, Margery S 


5.00 


Forbes, Edward L. . . . 


2.00 


Eraser, Arthur 




(Kennel) ........ 


50.00 


Frazier, Robert A. . . . 


2.00 


Freeman, George . . . 


2.00 


Freeman, Harold 


2.00 


Freeman, William H. . 


2.00 


French, James H. . . . 


2.00 


Fullonton, Llewellyn . 


2.00 


Gagnon, Ida 


7.00 


Gallagher, Margaret . . 


2.00 


Gallant, Mildred 


2.00 


Gallant, Raymond . . . . 


2.00 


Gatchell, Herman H. . . 


7.00 


Gibbs, Harry F. . . . . . 


5.00 


Godfrey, Carl R. . . . . . 


2.00 


Goodearl, Robert 


2.00 


Goodrich, Howard . . . 


2.00 


Goucher, Barbara . . , . 


2.00 



Goward, Hannah C. . . 5.00 

Gray, Charles E 2.00 

Haas, Henry C 2.00 

Hall, Arthur L 5.00 

Hall, Robert C 2.00 

Hall, Walter F . 2.00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Hart, Nelson H 2.00 

Hatch, Raymond L. . . . 2.00 

Hayes, F. C 2.00 

Hayes, Michael G 4.00 

Haynes, Henry L 2.00 

Heuss, Frederick H. . . 2.00 

Hill, George 2.00 

Holden, Frank H. .... 2.00 

Holden, Willis L. .... 2.00 

Holland, Hope C 2.00 

Holland, Neville R. . . 2.00 

Hollowell, Norman E. . 5.00 

Hopkins, Frederic .... 4.00 

Howard, Clarence R. . 2.00 

Howard, Vivian D. . . . 2.00 

Howe, Oscar H 2.00 

Hubbard, David M. . . 5.00 

Ineson, Benjamin J. . . 2.00 

Jalonen, Arthur 4.00 

Jenks, Albert R 4.00 

Jensen, Albert . 2.00 

Jensen, Peter . 2.00 

Johnson, Mary 2.00 

Jones, Howard L. .... 4.00 

Jones, Karl R 2.00 

Jules, Alfred B 2.00 

Kazokas, Cypras 2.00 

Kazokas, William C. . . 5.00 

Kelley, Chester E 2.00 

Kilmartin, Flora G. . . . 7.00 

Kimball, Elnathan . . . 6.00 



—38— 



King, William . . . 
Kulberg, Hiarry 0. 
Laffin, Ormal S. R. 
Laffin, Sidney 0. . . 
Lane, Patricia R. . 
LaRoche, Arthur . . 
Liebfried, George F. 
Liebfried, Walter . 
Liese, Blanche .... 

Liese, Louise 

Litchard, Lucy B. . 
Livermore, Pearl R 
Livermore, Roland 
Lockwood, Ralph H. 
Lothrop, Mary .... 
Love, Gordon G. . . 
Lowden, Richard . . 
MacGregor, H. Stuart 
MacKinnon, F. Roy 
Mahoney, James . 
Manter, Charles D. 
Marsh, Albert W 
Marshall, W. L., Jr. 
Mason, Roger . . 
Massie, W. A. . 
Mauro, Frank . 
Maynes, Everett M 
McCarthy, Leo . 
Mead, Albertie . 
Mekkelson, Soren 
Mel, Eleanor . . . 
Milbery, Virginia 
Miller, Orson K. 
Mills, Myra Zeta 
Montague, Everett N. 
Moore, Mildred Pope 
Murgatroyd, James . 
Murray, John 



2.00 Nealey, Mrs. Edward . 2.00 

5.00 Nichols, Orla 2.00 

5.00 Oliver, Hazel W. ..... 2.00 

5.00 Parks, Milton G 2.00 

2.00 Parsons, Elsie F 2.00 

2.00 Parsons, Mrs. Norman 7.00 

5.00 Pederson, John 6.00 

5.00 Pendergast, Edward L. 2.00 

2.00 Penney, D. F 2.00 

5.00 Penney, Mrs. George . 5.00 

10.00 Penney, Mary 5.00 

2.00 Penney, Raymond 2.00 

10.00 Perkins, A. Hazeltine . 2.00 

2.00 Perkins, Mrs. Edgar A. 2.00 

5.00 Perkins, LaForrest . . . 2.00 

2.00 Perry, Tony 2.00 

2.00 Peterson, Edwin 2.00 

2.00 Peterson, Ruth 2.00 

2.00 Peterson, William S. . . 2.00 

2.00 Pierce, Isabel F 2.00 

2.00 Powers, Clyde R 4.00 

2.00 Pratt, Herbert T. . . . 2.00 

4.00 Putnam, F. Wendell . . 2.00 

4.00 Rahberg, Francis 2.00 

2.00 Raymond, George J. . . 2.00 

2.00 Reed, George H 2.00 

2.00 Reed, G. Howard .... 5.00 

2.00 Reed, Otis 2.00 

2.00 Rhodes, Robert S. F. . . 2.00 

2.00 Rifford, Jeanette L . . . 2.00 

2.00 Rimback, Frederick . . . 2.00 

2.00 Robbins, Mildred H. . . 5.00 

2.00 Roche, Frank B 5.00 

2.00 Roche, Norman 2.00 

2.00 Roe, George 2.00 

4.00 Rugg, George 2.00 

7.00 Sawyer, Benjamin . . . 2.00 

2.00 Scanlon, Ruth H 2.00 



—39— 

Schofield, Clifford A. . 2.00 Tolman, Wilbur J 5.00 

Scribner, Harry V. . . . 2.00 Tompkins, Elizabeth . . 5.00 

Shapley, Eva C 2.00 Towler, Mrs. Mary . . . 2.00 

Sharek, Lucretia 5.00 Towne, Roger P 2.00 

Sheridan, Eleanor . . . 2.00 Tracy, Alfred H 2.00 

Simeone, Frank 7.00 Tuttle, George F 2.00 

Simeone, Modesto 2.00 Tuttle, Osgood 5.00 

Smith, Ralph I 2.00 Veasie, Stanley R. . . . 2.00 

Soar, William Henry . . 2.00 Vose, Charles E 2.00 

Spinney, Marion ..... 2.00 Wait, Albert F , . 2.00 

Starck, Cecil .... 2.00 Waite, Frederick A. . . 7.00 

Stevens, John N 2.00 Waluk, John 2.00 

Stoney, Reginald 2.00 Wardle, John P 2.00 

Stuart, Leslie E 2.00 Wayne, Burton H. . . . 2.00 

Sweeney, Daniel 2.00 Wells, Carrie F 2.00 

Sweet, Charles Craig . 2.00 Whitcomb, Roy S. 2.00 

Taylor, Charles P. . . . 2.00 White, Eugene H 5.00 

Taylor, Lillian E 2.00 White, Robert 2.00 

Taylor, Simon D. .... 2.00 Willett, Fred W 2.00 

Taylor, Spencer H. . . . 2.00 Wise, Glenna 2.00 

Teele, Mrs. Henry 2.00 Wood, Oliver D. ..... 2.00 

Tibbetts, Earl L 2.00 Young, Roderick T. . . 7.00 

Todd, Ethel L. ...... 13.00 

234 licenses at $2.00 $468.00 

60 licenses at 5.00 300.00 

1 license at 25.00 25.00 

1 license at 50.00 50.00 

843.00 



Deduct fees 296 licenses at 20 cents 59.20 



Paid to Town Treasurer $783.80 

NOTICE 

All licenses expire March 31 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the owners 
or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 



—40- 



The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of time of year ownership is acquired. 

No tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



Jury List Revised — 1939 



W. Stuart Allen 
Ray L. Harris 
Frank W. Putnam, Jr. 
Murray Brown 



Precinct 1 

Wilmot E. Taylor 
Roy S. Whitcomb 
Robert C. Hall 
George E. Murphy 



W. Burton Harvey 



Reginald Stoney 
Daniel W. Sheehan 
John Anderson 
Carl E. Anderson 



Precinct 2 

Frank Penney 
V/illiam Driscoll 
Charles Capelle 
Hugh C. Hodgen 
Alfred G. Gilbert 



Leland H. Campbell 
John E. Beach 
Arthur Lee 
William Davis 



Precinct 3 

Waldo E. Whitcomb 
Havelock J. Schnair 
Edward J. Bursaw 
Porter G. Jenks 
Walter E. Byron 



—41— 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 
For the Year 1939 



A member of our board, Mr. Fred W. Green, died on the 
thirtieth day of January in his 81st year. 

He was an active member of the board and also Superin- 
tendent of Cemeteries until his death. 

We desire to place on record our testimony to his long 
and faithful service and his interest in the care and improve- 
ment of our cemeteries. 

iMr. Harry E. Holt was chosen to fill the unexpired term 
of Mr. Green. 

Mr. Fred S. Kennedy was appointed Superintendent of 
Mt. Hope, and Mr. Elwin H. Hollowell Superintendent of 
Woodlawn. Mr. Kennedy was also appointed Superintendent 
of Burials. 

Beginning April 1st the board adopted a new policy in 
regard to burials and care of lots, which provided that the 
charge for burials, care of lots and all private work should 
be made in the name of the town or cemetery department, 
and all money received therefrom should be paid into the town 
treasury. 

Since April 1 there has been paid into the treasury on 
account of cemeteries $474.75 and also paid into the Cemetery 
Land Fund on account of lots sold $158 and lumber sold $150. 

In order that this money turned into the treasury may be 
made available for the care of cemeteries we have asked for 
an increase in our appropriation to $1900. 

Amount to be raised $1,600.00 

Transfer from Land Fund .... 300.00 

At Mt. Hope there is an area of ground on which a 



—42— 

growth of young pines was uprooted by the hurricane, which 
remains to be cleaned up. 

We recommend that a limited area, adjoining the part 
already laid out, be cleared and improved. 

We have approved plans for improving the southerly 
entrance from Central Street at Mt. Hope. 

To finance these projects we recommend a special appro- 
priation of $500. 

This miatter will come before the town under an article 
inserted in the warrant for the annual meeting. 

At Woodlawn we plan to grade and clear the ground 
where the pine timber has been removed in the old part, and 
continue the work of landscaping the new part by planting 
trees and building a wall along Concord Road. 

An itemized account of the expenditures for care of 
cemeteries will be found in the report of the Town Accountant. 

We have prepared a schedule of receipts and expendi- 
tures on account of each lot in perpetual care, in books kept 
for that purpose, which may be examined by persons inter- 
ested. 

We ask the cooperation of all who are interested in the 
care and beautification of our cemeteries. 

HARRY E. HOLT, 
WENDELL F. DAVIS, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



—43— 

W. p. A. Work Relief 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report on W. P. A. projects which 
I supervised during the year ending December 31, 1939. 

FIRE HAZARD PROJECT 

Approximately six hundred men worked on the fire hazard 
project, cutting, burning and ricking pine slash throughout 
the woodlands in the town. All wood roads were reopened. 

This work has been completed except fot the burning of 
about four thousand ricks. It was impossible to burn the ricks 
because of the dry weather. A project to take care of this 
work is expected to start soon. 

SHADE TREE PROJECT 

There were twelve men working on this project, trim- 
ming, removing trees, hauling wood to the welfare pit and 
hauling brush to the town dump. Approximately four hun- 
dred trees were trimmed and sixty-seven trees removed. 

This work was done in the following sections : Arlington 
Street, Central Street, Church Street, Massachusetts Avenue, 
School Street, Summer Street, Willow Street and Windsor 
Avenue, West Acton. Also a section of Main Street, Acton 
Center, was done. 

MOTH CONTROL PROJECT 

There have been nineteen men working on this project, 
creosoting gypsy moth egg clusters. For the protection of 
the shade trees, this work has been done for a distance of 
three hundred feet back from the highways. 

At the present time the work has been done in some of 
the most badly infested sections of the town, namely. Brook 
Street, Esterbrook Road, North Main Street and Pope Road. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Sponsor's Foreman. 



—44- 



Report of Superintendent of Streets 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Highway 
Department for the year 1939. 

The objective of the Highway Department this year has 
been an attempt to cure some of the chronic ills of certain of 
its roads by widening, regrading or drainage. This will cut 
down on some of the annual patching expense and make more 
of the allotment available for other work. 

The regular maintenance program entailed patching, 
scraping, brush cutting, repairing and painting guard fence, 
cleaning drainage and surface treating with asphalt many 
miles of roads. Massachusetts Avenue and sections of Cen- 
tral, Main and Parker streets were surface treated with 
peastone, making skid resistant surfaces. 

New drainage, consisting of 320 feet of 12 inch pipe and 
two catch basins, was installed on Powder Mill Road to replace 
a plank covered ditch. Three catch basins were built on 
Arlington Street. A new bridge was built on Stow Street to 
replace an old stone structure which had broken through, and 
a catch basin and 24 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed at the 
intersection of Robbins Street. A new bridge was built on 
Conant Street replacing an old stone one, the abutments of 
which had partially collapsed. Thirty-six feet of 12 inch pipe 
was laid on Nagog Hill Road to make a lateral drain. Curb 
inlets were installed on School Street to increase openings of 
catch basins and prevent stoppage of drains by leaves and hay 
in event of sudden heavy rainfall. 

School Street was scarified and regraded with new gravel 
and asphalt for 350 feet. Robbins Street had some ledge and 
dirt excavated to widen a curve. New gravel was placed 20 



—45— 

feet wide for 1050 feet. Stow Street was scarified and regraded 
with new gravel and asphalt for 1100 feet. Fletcher Court was 
scarified and regraded with gravel and asphalt treated. Fort 
Pond Road was widened with gravel for 300 feet. Nagog 
Hill Road was widened with new gravel and asphalt for 1000 
feet. Hammond Street was widened by excavating ledge and 
dirt, and gravel was placed for 550 feet. Central Street was 
scarified and regraded with new gravel and asphalt for 500 
feet. Conant Street had a curve widened by relocation of 
stone wall, taking land from Mrs. Catherine McLaughlin. 
Ledge and dirt were excavated for 400 feet. 

Town line signs and posts were installed at Carlisle line 
on Carlisle Road, Littleton line on Fort Pond Road, Maynard 
line on Concord Street and Maynard line on Main Street. 

An inventory of tools and equipment was taken twice this 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1939. 

An appropriation of $700 was made for this work last 
year. This money was used for emergency work, such as 
removing broken and dangerous limbs from trees, bolting and 
removing trees. 

At present the trees are in very bad shape. If the trees 
do not receive the proper care this year, a great many more 



—46— 

will be lost. The elm trees should also be inspected for Dutch 
Elm disease. More trees should be planted. 

I therefore recommend the sum of $1500 be appropriated 
for the removing, trimming, bolting and replacing of trees — 
also for the scouting for Dutch Elm disease. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden. 



Report of Superintendent of Moth Control Work 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1939 

The appropriation of $1,200 was ma4e for this work last 
year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $325. The labor 
and running expense of the sprayer and truck was about $390. 
This included one spray throughout the town, also a second 
spray in the badly infested sections. 

The balance of the appropriation was used for creosoting 
gypsy moth egg clusters along the highways and for other 
necessary work as directed by the State. 

An appropriation of $1,200 is recommended for mxOth 
control, which will include a spray throughout the town, and a 
second spray of the badly infested areas. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent. 



—47- 



Assessors' Report — 1939 



Tax assessed as follows : 

Buildings, exclusive of land . . . $2,502,350.00 

Land . 659,100.00 

Personal 409,910.00 

$3,571,360.00 

Valuation January 1, 1938 3,598.015.00 

Decrease in valuation 26,655.00 

Kate of taxation, $28.00 

Real Estate $88,520.60 

Personal Estate 11,477.48 

Polls 1,832.00 

$101,830.08 

Amount of Money Raised: 

State Tax $10,440.00 

County Tax 4,985.04 

State Parks Tax 174.09 

1938 Underestimates — 

County State State Parks Tax 
8.27 5220.00 10.78 5,239.05 

Auditing Municipal Accounts . . 14.11 

Town Grant 76,912.30 

Overlay 4,065.49 

$101,830.08 

Added Assessment: 

Real Estate . $4,400.00 $4,400.00 

Tax: 

Real Estate $123.20 

Polls 8.00 

$131.20 

Excise : 

Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1,212 

Total Val. of Motor Vehicles . . $270,340.00 



—48— 

Rate of Taxation, $35.90 

Total Excise Tax $7,789.23 

ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
HENRY L. HAYNES, 
CARL C. FLINT, 

Board of Assessors. 



Report of Trustees of Goodnow Fund For the Year 
Ending December 31, 1939 



INVESTMENTS 

Warren Institution for Savings $1,465.54 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

RECEIPTS 

Warren Institution for Savings 29.46 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank 22.50 

City Institution for Savings 20.00 

PAYMENTS 
Harlan E. Tuttle, treasurer of the 

Evangelical Church in Acton .... $51.96 

Town of Acton for care of lot in 

Woodlawn Cemetery 20.00 



$3,465.54 



71.96 



$71.96 



CHARLOTTE GONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



—49- 



Report of the Work of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service in Acton for the Year 1939 



The following is a report of the work of the iMiddlesex 
County Extension Service in the town of Acton during the 
year 1939: 

Acton farmers have taken an increased interest in Exten- 
sion Service projects. Porter G. Jenks is a member of the 
County Dairy Committee and the Executive Committee of the 
Herd Health Association. The herds of David F. Penny and 
Porter Jenks are in the Dairy Herd Improvement Association. 
Mr. Charles H. Liebfried, Robert I. Smith and Jorgen Larsen 
are growing Ladino clover, a new legume for this area. Grass 
silage was put up by Harriman and Prentice, David Penny 
and Porter Jenks. A Herd Health Demonstration meeting 
was held at the Jenks' farm in midsummer. Assistance was 
given farmers in planning for improved pastures and better 
quality roughage. Information Was made available on milk 
marketing and individual farmers were helped with their 
problems in the market. A spray service was maintained for 
the fruit growers within the town and some assistance was 
rendered in the marketing of apples. The Middlesex County 
Poultrj^ Association held regular monthly meetings in the 
Women's Club building in Acton Center. About twenty poul- 
trymen in Acton were visited. These visits concerned such 
things as farm accounting, obtaining credit, poultry diseases 
and general poultry farm organization. Circular material and 
meeting notices were sent to all those who keep much poultry. 

Mrs. Elwin Hollowell is chairman of the town committee 
in charge of the women's work in Acton which is done through 
the Extension Service. Mrs. Hollowell is assisted by Mrs. 
Warren Davis. Other committee members are Mrs. Albert 
Durkee, Mrs. Claren Frost, Mrs. Arthur Freese, Mrs. Benja- 
min Ineson and Mrs. William Sexton. The homemakers of 



—50— 

Acton have received the extension projects most enthusiasti- 
cally. During the year they have attended a series of meetings 
devoted to the consumer buying of food and clothing. Besides 
the consumer program, they took up the refinishing of furni- 
ture, food preservation and clothing clinics and remodelling 
of garments. 

Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club v^ork was carried on during the 
year under the chairmanship of Mr. W. W. Hall, superin- 
tendent of schools, with the following serving as members of 
the town committee : Ruth Berglind, Cecelia Callanan, Grace 
Callanan, Mrs. Marjorie Flint, Eva Smart, Miriam Fletcher, 
Christine Leavitt, Rebecca Bartlett, Mrs. Warren Hartwell 
and Mrs. Walter Ballard. Club work was carried on through 
the schools with home furnishing work held at South, West 
and Center grade schools, and at the Junior High. Outstand- 
ing work was done by members of the South club under Miss 
Cecelia Callanan, Betty Davis' work having been sent to State 
Girls' Day at Amherst. Spring exhibits were held in conjunc- 
tion with annual school exhibits. Miss Leavitt was succeeded 
in September by Rebecca Bartlett. Other new clubs organized 
in October were a food group led by Mrs. Warren Hartwell 
and Mrs. Walter Ballard, and a sewing club led by Eva Smart 
and Miriam Fletcher. 



Report of Sponsor's Agent 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

During the year, work was done on the following W. P. A. 
projects: Fire Hazard, Shade Tree and Moth Control. 

The expenditures on these projects for the year were : 

Federal Funds $104,472.96 

Sponsor's Funds 1,401.05 

Total expenditures $105,874.01 

Respectfully submitted, 

VIRGINIA MILBERY, 

Sponsor's Agent. 



-Si- 



Report of the Sealer of Weights and Measures 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The report of the Sealer of Weights and Measures is here- 
with submitted for the year 1939. 

During the year 444 weighing and measuring devices 
were sealed, 12 condemned and 12 not sealed. 

A 100 gallon test tank, mounted on a trailer, for the 
purpose of testing tank truck meter systems, was loaned by 
the State Department of Standards, greatly facilitating the 
testing of meters for accuracy and efficiency. 

An inspector from the Department of Standards also 
tested two platform scales for weighing trucks with their 
loads, one as a master scale for the town and the other after 
repairs and adjustments for accuracy. This required a state 
owned truck equipped with a capacity of 27 tons. 

I wish to thank the owners of equipment tested for the 
fine cooperation shown and their keen desire that all devices 
be correct at all times. 

Total Sealing Fees collected $79.64 

Paid Town Treasurer . $79.64 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARE A. MILBERY, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



-52— 



Police Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Acton : 

I herewith submit my 13th Annual Report for the year 
ending December 31, 1939, for your consideration. 

DEPARTMENT ROSTER 

Chief 
MICHAEL FOLEY 

Reserve Officers 
George A. Braman, Norman L. Perkins, Robert G. Willett 

Special Police 

Louis F. Leveroni, Benjamin H. Sawyer, Orma L. Clark, M. D., 

Alexander L. Frazier, Ralph W. Piper, Raymond F. 

Durkee, James E. Kinsley 

Miscellaneous Duties: 

Telephone calls received 646 

Telephone calls made 211 

Persons coming to office 235 

Radio calls received 28 

Called by lights at Squares 7 

Complaints received and investigated 192 

Assisted in investigations for other Departments .... 6 

Emergency messages delivered 11 

Assisted in search for escaped prisoners 2 

Burglar Alarms answered (all false) 7 

Calls received for labor trouble 1 

Homes checked in absence of owners at their request . 12 

Street lights reported out 3 

Fire alarms answered 23 

Traffic at funerals, auctions, parades, etc 22 

Called out sand trucks to sand streets 3 

Reported bad places in streets to the Supt 5 



—53— 

Obstructions removed from highway 1 

Policed Town Meetings 2 

Policed Caucus 1 

Signal lights found broken at R. R. Crossings 1 

Signal lights reported out of order at R. R. Crossings . 1 

Persons reported missing and located . 4 

Children reported lost in woods and located 2 

Suspicious persons reported, picked up and questioned 5 

People assisted out of Town 4 

Prowlers reported 4 

Persons reported accidentally shot 2 

Air rifles taken from boys under 15 years of age 3 

Fights on street broken up 3 

Persons assisted when accidentally locked out of 

their homes 2 

Intoxicated persons sent off of street 1 

Acts of vandals reported 4 

Protection given during collection of money. 2 

Glass reported in street 1 

Live Wires in street reported 1 

Stray dogs reported 4 

Lost dogs reported 4 

Persons reported bitten by dogs 2 

Revolver permits issued 11 

Result of check on tmoccupied houses, Public Buildings, etc., 
during patrol after midnight: 

Windows found open at High School 2 

Doors found open at High School 2 

Doors found unlocked at High School 1 

Lights left on at High School 3 

Lights left on at South School 1 

Doors found open in unoccupied houses 1 

Lights checked on in unoccupied houses 1 

Breaks reported: 

Stores, Garages, etc 7 

High School 1 



—54— 

South School 1 

Homes reported broken into 2 

Larceny cases reported 14 

Reported stolen in breaks. 

Store break— Merchandise, Total value $1,000.00 

Garage break — Flashlights, batteries, cash, etc. 15.00 

Garage break — Chevrolet truck 900.00 

Store break — Cash 15.60 

School break — Stop-watch and cash 6.00 

House break — Blankets, sheets, etc 15.00 

House break — Small tools and radio 20.00 

Larceny of following articles reported: 

350 gallons of gasoline and three drums 55.50 

7 gallons of motor oil 7.00 

3 v^atches 40.00 

2 radios 30.00 

1 bicycle 5,00 

1 tricycle .75 

6 forty-gallon milk cans 6.00 

7 pigs 21.00 

40 chickens 30.00 

Property recovered, including abandoned cars: 

1 1937 Oldsmobile Sedan Value $400.00 

2 1939 Oldsmobile Sedans '' 1,600.00 

1 1939 Chevrolet truck " 900.00 

1 1939 Ford Sedan " 500.00 

1 1932 Buick Sedan '' 100.00 

1 1934 Ford truck " 150.00 

1 radio " 10.00 

1 watch " 10.00 

1 set of registration plates " 2.00 

1 tricycle " .75 

1 bicycle " 5.00 

150 gallons of gasoline and 3 drums " 10.50 

1 electric razor " 10.00 



—55— 

Article stolen in store breaks: flashlights, 
cigarette cases, etc., stolen in 1938 and 

recovered in 1939 " 3.50 

Restitution $120.80 

Arrests made for following offenses: 

Drunkenness 18 

Traffic violations 9 

Operating under the influence 8 

Operating negligently 1 

Disturbing the peace 2 

Assault and battery 2 

Operating without a license 2 

Larceny 2 

Breaking and Entering and larceny 3 

Speeding 1 

Non-Support 3 

Vagrancy 1 

Abandonment 1 

Passing a car with view obstructed 1 

Non-payment of fine 1 

Neglected children 2 

Runaway boys picked up and returned home 8 

Feeble minded persons picked up and returned home 1 

Committed to State Hospital 1 

Motor Vehicle Accident Report; cars checked, etc.: 

Accidents reported 51 

Occupants reported injured 27 

Pedestrians injured 2 

Injured when bicycle hit by auto 1 

Injured persons assisted 4 

Licenses suspended or revoked 27 

Operators reported to Registrar for violations 4 

Persons summoned to Court 6 

Persons summoned for other departments 39 

Operators warned for motor violations 67 

Cars checked after midnight 13 



—56— 

Motorists assisted after midnight 7 

Cars ordered towed off of highways 6 

Cars brought into town and destroyed by fire 1 

Dogs reported killed by motor vehicles . 6 

Dogs reported injured by m.otor vehicles 2 

Letters of recommendation for the reissuing of 

licenses, etc = . 10 

A Comparison of Motor Vehicle Accidents, 1938-1939: 

A comparison of the motor vehicle accident record of 1938 
and 1939 show that while there was an increase of 7, in the 
number of accidents reported, the number of persons injured 
dropped to 30, which is 5 less than were injured in 1938. We 
also went through the year without a single fatal accident, com- 
pared with two deaths in 1938. 

Approximate mileage covered during patrol and investiga- 
tions, trips to other Cities and Towns : 
Mileage covered 25,000 miles 

Trips to Waltham 5 

Stow 1 

Maynard 14 

Littleton 6 

Lancaster 1 

Harvard 1 

Concord and West Concord 15 

Cambridge 3 

Belmont 1 

Boxboro 3 

Boston 4 

Ayer 2 

West Acton (outside of regular patrol) 17 

North Acton " '' " " 10 

East Acton " " " " 7 

Acton Center " " " " 4 

Recommendations for Higl^way Safety: 

1. Due to complaints and many reports of fast driving 
through the three villages, I would recommend that a speed 



—57— 

limit of 25 miles per hour be adopted in the thickly settled 
areas. While we were prohibited from posting our highways 
against speeding in the past, it is now possible to do so and 
''Button" type signs reading ''Not Over 25 M. P. H." can now 
be obtained at about three dollars each. I believe that if the 
necessary number of signs are installed, it will help to prevent 
accidents and possible loss of life. 

2. That traffic lines be painted at curves on the follow- 
ing streets: Central Street, at Richardson Corner and at the 
Cemetery; Concord Road at Hosmer Street; School Street at 
Piper Corner (2 curves) ; Main Street at Crosby Corner and 
at Hayward Road. Also that the Squares at South and West 
Acton be painted. This work should be done as early as possi- 
ble each year. 

3. The disregard of operators to obey Article 5, Sec. 1-D, 
of the Traffic Rules and Orders, on Main Street, South Acton, 
when stopping at the Post Office has been responsible for sev- 
eral slight accidents at this point. These operators park with 
the two left wheels to the curb, then pull out from the curb 
directly across the Main Street. This Section states that both 
wheels on the right side of the car must be parked within 12 
inches of the curb. I would recommend that two signs be in- 
stalled near the Post Office before taking action against these 
operators. 

4. That School Street, West Acton, be made a "Stop" 
street at Massachusetts Avenue. 

5. The danger of school children being injured near the 
school yards is aways paramount and to reduce this danger as 
much as possible I recommend that "School Zone" signs be in- 
stalled in the area near the three grade schools. 

A word to the parents: 

The riding of bicycles at night without lights, while a very 
dangerous practice is also a direct violation of the law. Dur- 
ing the past year the number of children riding bicycles on 
the streets has more than doubled in number and very few 



—58— 

of these bicycles are equipped with lights that can be seen, 
front and rear. Parents know that their children are out at 
night with these bicycles and are therefore directly to blame. 
This practice must be stopped and I am asking all parents to 
co-operate so that court action will not be necessary to force 
these children to light their bicycles when riding at night. 

Remarks : 

In closing this report, I want to bring to the attention of 
the Citizens of Acton, the necessity of an increase in the Police 
Appropriation, so that they may be given the protection to 
which they are entitled. 

Only a very small percentage of the people realize that 
out of the $2,100.00 allowed the Chief as salary and trans- 
portation, he must furnish a car, gas, oil, accessories, etc., to 
be used in the protection of a Town with a population of near- 
ly 3,000 people and an assessed value of over $3,000,000; or 
that he is on call or actual patrol twenty-four hours a day, 
every day in the year, with the exception of about five hours 
a week. During the year he covers more than 25,000 miles pa- 
troling the Town and during investigations. These investiga- 
tions carry him to many other Towns and Cities which often 
incur expenses such as meals, etc., for which no allowance is 
made. 

Any interested citizen can look in the Police report each 
year and find the number of persons arrested, the number of 
accidents reported, or the number of crimes committed, but it 
is impossible to even estimate the number of crimes, arrests 
and accidents prevented by this patrol. The efficiency of a 
Police Department should not be judged by the number of ar- 
rests but it should be expected to do all that is possible to give 
protection and prevent crime within the Town. 

Now, if you citizens will take a few minutes and figure 
out the cost of running a car for 25,000 miles, even at the low 
cost of three cents per mile, then add to this the trade-in cost 
of a car, which is $250 to $300, and then subtract the total 
from the amount allowed for salary and transportation and 



—59— 

you will find that the salary you are paying your Chief is low- 
er than the salary of any patrolman in the State. 

I have checked the records which show that although there 
has been a total of 308 motor vehicle accidents reported, in 
which 270 persons were injured and 8 persons lost their lives, 
and resulted in property damage of thousands of dollars dur- 
ing the past six years, the meager allowance for the protection 
of life and property has been reduced $200, over that allowed 
in 1936. 

In view of the above facts, I would suggest that the ap- 
propriation this year be increased to $3,200. This would allow 
for an increase of $400 in transportation and also allow for a 
part-time officer to work one day a week and give the regular 
officer one day off a week. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank all the Citizens of Acton 
who have co-operated with me in the past year, and to those 
few who have spread malicious lies about me or who have tried 
to instigate ill feeling toward me, I extend my sympathy. To 
those efficient officers of this department, the State police, and 
the local telephone operators, I express my sincere thanks, and 
commend them for their fine work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



-60— 



Librarian's Report, 1939 



Accessions — Number of volumes in Library Jan. 1, 1939, 
21,124. Increase by purchase, 394. Increase by gift, 33. Total 
increase, 427. Withdrawn from circulation, 324. Total num- 
ber of volumes in the Library Jan. 1, 1940 — 21,227. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was open, 101. 
Number of volumes circulated, 14,751. 
Largest daily circulation, 254, Feb. 25. 
Smallest daily circulation, 12, Sept. 16. 
Daily average circulation, 145. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold, and paid 
to Town Treasurer, $41.03. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Gov't, 2; State of Mass., 8; Anon, 6; Harold 
Freeman, 4; Maj. Charles S. Coulter, 1; Rev. A. J. Torsleff, 1; 
Ernest H. Washburn, 1 ; Mrs. Frank Peters, 1 ; a graduate of 
Yale, 1 ; Associates of E. A. Filene, 1 ; Emma Doane Galger, 1 ; 
R. L. McDonald, 1 ; H. V. Smith, 1 ; Mail and Express Pub. Co., 
1 ; Jewish Opinion Pub. Co., 2 ; Smithsonian Institution, 1. 
Total, 33. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 
Librarian. 



NON-FICTION 

Abbott, J.— Changing New York 917.3A131c 

Allen, A. A.— The Golden Plover and Other Birds 59A425g 

Alpheus, A. — Were You Born Under a Lucky Star. .52A456w 
Andrews, C. M. — The Colonial Period in Am. History, 

Vol. 4 973.2A565CO 

Anon— Here's New England 917.3A100h 

Bain, R.— The Clans and Tartans of Scotland 941B162c 



—61— 

Beals, C. — The Coming Struggle for Latin America. 918B366c 

Beaty, J. Y.— The Baby Whale Sharp Ears 59B369b 

Bernheimer, C. L. — Rainbow Bridge 917.3B527r 

Brown, W. A.— The Church in America 28B881c 

Budge, E. A. — The Rosetta Stone in the British 

Museum 930B927r 

Butler, N. M.— Across the Busy Years, Vol. 1 922B987b 

Butler, S. D.— War Is a Racket 17B987w 

Canby, H. S.— Thoreau 922T488ca 

Carmer, C— The Hudson 917.3C287h 

Carnochan, F. G.— Out of Africa 916.6C291o 

Chamberlain, S. — Lexington and Concord 917.3C44311 

Chamberlain, S. — New England Doorways 72C443n 

Cheley, F. H.— Little Camp Fires 17C5161 

Churchill, W. S.— Step by Step, 1936-1939 940.3C563s 

Chuse, A. — Costume Design 39C559c 

Clark, J. J. — The Slide Rule and Logarithmic Tables, 51C593s 
Copeland, R. S.— Dr. Copeland's Home Medical Book, 61C782d 

Crawford, K. P.— The Pressure Boys 32C899p 

D'Aulaire, L and E. — East of the Sun and West of 

the Moon 39D239e 

DeCordora, R. J.— The Wit and Humor of the 70's. .81D296w 

Eliot, G. F.— The Ramparts We Watch 35E42r 

Engelbrecht, A. C. and others — How to Combat Anti- 
Semitism in America 30E57h 

Fay, B.— Revolution and Free Masonry, 1680-1800. . .36F282r 

Ferber, E. — A Peculiar Treasure 922F346f 

Filene, E. A.— Speaking of Change, 1860-1937 33F481s 

Fitch, L. E.— Attractive Parties for Children 79F545a 

Floherty, J. J.-^Make Way for the Mail 38F629m 

Forbes, R. — Forbidden Road - Kabul to 

Samarkand 915.4F694f 

Foster, S.— The Songs of Stephen Foster 78F757s 

Franck, H. A. — The Lure of Alaska 917.3F8221 

Frohman, D. — Encore 920F928f 

Frothingham, P. R. — Edward Everett 922E93f 

Galger, L. H. — Life's Mysteries 81G1551 



—62— 

Greever, G. and Jones, E. S. — Century Handbook of 

Writing 42G816c 

Grover, E. 0.— Old Testament Stories 22G883o 

Gumpert, M.— Dunant - the Story of the Red Gross. 928D897g 

Gunther, J. — Inside Asia 915G977i 

Hallibarton, R. — Seven League Boots 910H188s 

Hammond, B. — The Federal Reserve System 33H225f 

Hardwig, J. B. — Sources of Pollution, Merrimac 

River Valley 61H263s 

Harrison, G. R. — Atoms in Action 53H323a 

Hine, C. G.— The Story of Martha's Vinyard 9745H662s 

Hodgson, F. T. — Light and Heavy Timber Framing . . 69H6811 

Holmes, J. H.— Through Gentile Eyes 17H751t 

Hooper, M.— Life Along the Connecticut River. . .917.3H7871 

Hottes, A. C— The Book of Annuals 63H834b 

James, N. — Petticoat Vagabond 910J28p 

Johnson, J. W. — Heating - Ventilating, etc 69 J67h 

Johnson, J. W. — Plumbing - Drainage, etc 69J67p 

Jones, M. B.— Vermont in the Making, 1750-1777. . . 974.3 J78r 

Jordanoff, A.— Flying and How to Do It 62J821f 

Kains, M. G.— Five Acres 63K13f 

Kinsay, A. C. — New Introduction to Biology 57K56n 

Lashelle, D.— The River Niagara 917.3L343r 

Leech, H. and Carroll, J. C. — Armour and His Times . 922A7271 
Leonard, S. A. (Ed.) — The Atlantic Book of Modern 

Plays 80L581a 

Lewis, 0.— The Big Four 921L675b 

Lippincott, I.— Sold Out 33L765s 

Lockrey, A. J. — Plastics 73L813p 

McConnell, B. M.— Mexico At the Bar of Public 

Opinion 917.2M129m 

McGuire, P.— Australia 914.4M148a 

McKie, D. — Antoine Lavoisier .925L414m 

Mann, W. J.— Little Walks on Enchanted Ground. .917.3M2821 

Manly and Powell — Better Business Letters 65M279b 

Mason, B. S.— Woodcraft 79M398w 

Mason, A. T.— The Brandeis Way 33M398b 

Medsger, 0. P.— Edible Wild Plants 58M492e 



—63— 

Mitchell, E. V.— Maine Summer .917.3M681m 

Moley, R.— After Seven Years 32M719a 

Nesbit, L. M.— Hell-hole of Creation 916.7N458h 

Parker, R. A. —A Yankee Saint 922N955p 

Partridge, B. — Country Lawyer 922P275p 

Patterson, H. L. H.— Enjoy the Bible's Beauty 22P318e 

Phelps, W. L.— Autobiography With Letters 922P541p 

Putney, W. K.— Teamwork in Colonial Days 973.2P988t 

Raeth, G. A.— Home Furniture Making 67R134h 

Rebell, F.— Escape to Sea 910R291e 

Reck, F. M. — Romance of American Transportation. 38R298r 

Rhys, G.— A Celtic Anthology 80R468c 

Ridgway, W. H.— Draw Up a Chair 20R544d 

Robinson, V. (Ed.) — The Modern Home Physician. .61R665m 

Rogers, W.— Will Rogers,' Wit and Wisdom. 922R7311r 

Rosenbach, A. S. W.— A Book Hunter's Holiday 02R813b 

Rothery, A.— Finland, the New Nation 914.9R846f 

Russell, B.— Power 17R961p 

Russell, 0. D.— The House of Mitsui .929R679r 

Salzman, L. F. — England in Tudor Times 942S186e 

Schmid, B. — Interviewing Animals 59S348i 

Seely, C. S. — Russia and the Approaching 

Armageddon 914.7S452r 

Seitz, D. C. — Joseph Pulitzer 922P981s 

Sharpe, R. W.— A Laboratory Manual of Biology 57S5321 

Shaw, B.— Nine Plays 82S534n 

Sinclair, G. — Khyber Carravan .915.4S616k 

Sitwell, S. — Roumanian Journey 914.9S623r 

Smith, H. V. — Engine! Engine! 62S649e 

Smith, M.— The Art of Caracturing 74S655a 

Smith, W. M.— Profitable Bible Study 22S663p 

Sollitt, K. W. — Preaching From Pictures 24S688p 

Spahr, W. E.— The Fallacies of Prof. Irving 

Fisher's 100% Money 33S732f 

Thomas, L. — The Untold Story of Exploration 910T458u 

Thomas, L. and Barton, R. — In New Brunswick We'll 

Find It 917.1T458i 

Tilman, H. W.— Snow on the Equator .916.7T574s 



—64— 

Van Coevering, J. — Real Boys and Girls Go Birding . . 59V223r 

Verrill, A. H. — Our Indians 970V555o 

Wain, N.— Reaching For the Stars 914W217r 

Warner, L. — The Craft of the Japanese Sculptor .... 73W282c 

Warren, E. — Important American Poets 81W287i 

White, L. D. and Smith, T. V.— Politics and Public 

Service 35W585p 

Winkler, J. K. — The Dupont Dynasty 921W775d 

Winthrop, A.— Are You a Stockholder? 33W791a 

Wolcott, L— The Yankee Cook Book 64W849y 

Woodbury, D. 0.— The Glass Giant of Palomar 52W884g 

Woolacott, A. P. — Mackenzie and His Voyageurs.917.1W913m 

Yerkes, R. M.— The Dancing Mouse 59Y47d 

Yutang, L.— My Country and My People 915.1Y94m 

FICTION 

Aldrich, B. S.— Song of Years A3652s 

Asch, S. — The Nazarene A812n 

Baldwin, F. — Career by Proxy .BlSlc 

Baldwin, F.— The High Road B181hi 

Baldwin, F.— White Magic B181wj 

Bassett, S. W.— A Son of the Sea B319so 

Bechdolt, F. R.— The Tree of Death B391t 

Bennet, R. A. — Guns on the Rio Grande B469gu 

Bennet, R. A.— Horse Thief Hole . B469h 

Bennet, R. A. — Hot Lead B469ho 

Bonnamy, F. — Death on a Dude Ranch B7162d 

Bower, B. M.— A Starry Night B786st 

Bradford, R. — John Henry B799J 

Brand, M.— Gunman's Gold B817gu 

Brand, M.— Hunted Riders B817hu 

Brand, M.— Marbleface B817ma 

Brand, M.— Trouble Trail . B817tr 

Brand, M. — Rustlers of Beacon Creek .B817ru 

Brown, B.— Wedding Ring B8777w 

Buck, P.— The Exile B9221ex 

Buck, P.— The Patriot B9221p 

Bush, C— The Case of the Chinese Gong B978c 



—65— 

Bush, C— Eight O'clock Alibi B978e 

Cain, J. M. — The Postman Always Rings Twice C1881p 

Case, R. 0.— Big Timber » C337b 

Chalmers, S. — The Whispering Ghost C438w 

Chambers, R.— The Tree of Heaven C444t 

Chambers, W. — Dead Men Leave No Finger Prints .... C445d 

Chambers, W. — ^Murder For a Wanton C445m 

Christie, A. — Easy to Kill ... C5551ea 

Christie, M. — Woman in Love C5552w 

Clemens, S. L. — Short Stories C625s 

Cloete, S.— Watch For the Dawn C643w 

Cole, G. D. H. — Mrs. Warrender's Profession C6891m 

Colver, A.— Listen For the Voices C72711 

Corliss, A. — Daughter to Diana C799d 

Corliss, A.— Let Us Be Faithful C799I 

Dickson, C. — The Bowstring Murder D554b 

Douglas, L. C. — Disputed Passage D734d 

Douglas, L. C.-^Doctor Hudson's Secret Journal D734do 

Downes, A. M.— So Stands the Rock D748s 

Duffield, A.— Gay Fiesta D857g 

Ferguson, B. S.— Gilded Dust F3522gi 

Field, R.— All This and Heaven, Too F4551a 

Frost, F.— The Bamboo Whistle .F939b 

Frost, F.— Spy Meets Spy F939s 

Gath, D.— Breakfast Fortune . G244b 

Gray, Z.— Knights of the Range G842k 

Hauck, L. P. — Dear Deborah H368d 

Hauck, L. P. — Juliet Inc H368J 

Hawkins, D. — In Memory of Murder H3931i 

Henry, H.— Lady With a Past H5221 

Holt, H.— The Sinister Shadow H7582s 

Holton, E. A.— Wait For the Tide H758w 

Homes, G.—The Doctor Died at Dusk H767d 

Homes, G.—The Man Who Didn't Exist H767m 

Howes, R. — Night of the Garter Murder H8571n 

Hoyt, N.— Career Man H869ca 

Hoyt, N. — Three Cornered Love H869t 

Hughes, R.— Stately Timber H894s 



—66— 

Hull, H.— Frost Flower H913f 

Jennings, J. — Next to Valour J54n 

Kelland, C. B.— Arizona K293a 

Kelland, C. B.— Skin Deep K293sk 

Keeler, H. S. — The Mystery of the Fiddling Cracksman . K26m 

Keeler, H. S.— Riddle of the Travelling Skull K26r 

Kent, L. A. — Paul Revere Square K371p 

Kerr, S.— Stay Out of My Life K41s 

Lambert, R. — Lines to a Lady L2221 

Lambert, R.— Right to the Heart L222r 

Lambert, R.— They Who Have L222t 

Lawrence, J. — A Good Home With Nice People L421g 

LeMay, A.— The Smoky Years L549s 

LeMay, A. — White Range L549w 

Lincoln, J. C. and F. — The Ownley Inn L7372ow 

Loring, E. — Across the Years L873ac 

Loring, E.— High of Heart L873hi 

Lutz (Hill, G. L.)— The Seventh Hour L975se 

McCord, J. — Dotted-line Honeymoon M131do 

McCord, J.— The Return of Joan M133r 

MacDonald, W. C.— Law of the Forty-fives M13541 

MacDonald, W. C.— Riders of the Whistling Skull M1354r 

MacDonald, W. C— Rustlers' Paradise M1354ru 

MacDonald, W. C.— Six-gun Melody M1354s 

MacDonald, W. C.— Sleepy Horse Range M1354sl 

Marquand, J.— Wickf ord Point M357w 

Marsh, G.— Sled Trails and White Waters M3651sl 

Marshall, E. — The Doctor of Lonesome River M3675do 

Marshall, E. — Sam Campbell, Gentleman M3675sa 

Marshall, E.— The White Brigand M3675w 

Mason, F. Van W.— Three Harbours M3983t 

Merrick, M.— Headline Lady M568h 

Miller, H. T.— Next to My Heart M648n 

Moore, A. — Gunsmoke Clarion M8212g 

Mowery, W. B.— The Black Automatic M9362b 

Ogden, G. W. — Stockyards' Cowboy 034su 

Oppenheim, E. P. — Advice Limited 062ad 

Oppenheim, E. P.— Ask Miss Mott 062as 



—67— 

Oppenheim, E. P. — The Gallows of Chance 062gb 

Oppenheim, E. P. — The Spymaster 062ss 

Page, R. — Flame of Forgotten Guns P1331f 

Provost, A. L.— The Golden Girl P969g 

Rath, v.— Death At Dayton's Folly . R2342d 

Rawlings, M. K.— The Yearling R259y 

Robertson, F. C.— The Trouble Grabber R649t 

Roe, V. E.— Black Belle Rides the Uplands R699b 

Roe, V. E.— Flame of the Border R699f 

Roe, V. E.— Wild Hearts R699w 

Sabatini, R. — The Sword of Islam SllSsw 

Sangster, M. E.— Surgical Call S225s 

Sayers, D. L. — Strong Poison S274s 

Scott, R. T. M.— Ann's Crime S4282a 

Scott, R. T. M.— The Black Magician S4282b 

Scott, R. T. M.— Secret Service Smith S4282s 

Sims, M.— The World With a Fence S614w 

Snow, C. H. — Guns Along the Border . , S674g 

Starrett, V.— The Great Hotel Murder S796g 

Stebbins, L. P. — Peacock Place .SSllp 

Steinbeck, J.— Of Mice and Men S8191o 

Stiles, P. — Borrowed Lover S856b 

Stiles, P.— Lovers Must Live S8561 

Stong, P.— The Long Lane S8771 

Street, M. D.— Summer's End S915s 

Tarrant, C. A.— The Cat Climbs T192c 

Teilhet, D. L.— Bright Distinction T264b 

Van Dyke, J. — Passenger to Peking V2481p 

Walpole, H.— Vanessa W218r 

Webb, B.— Love's Choice W3651 

Wees, F. S.— Lost House W3941 

Wells, C— The Beautiful Derelict . W453be 

Wells, C— The Broken O W453bs 

Wells, C— The Clue of the Eyelash W453cl 

White, W. P.— Hidden Trails W5892h 

White, W. P.— Paradise Bend W5892p 

Wilhelm, G.— We, Too, Are Drifting W678w 

Williams, B. A.— Thread of Scarlet W721th 



—68— 

Wilsie, H. M.— Of Human Hearts W7411i 

Wodehouse, P. G.— Brinkley Manor W838br 

Wodehouse, P. G.— The Luck of the Bodkins W838ifr 

Wodehouse, P. G.— Thank You, Jeeves W838th 

Young, G.— Day's of '49 Y72d 

Young, G. — The Vengence of Hurricane Williams Y72r 

JUVENILE 

Adams, E. L. — War Wings JA2111wa 

Adams, E. L. — Wings of the Navy JA2111w 

Allee, M. H. — Runaway Linda JA422r 

Ambrose, B. A. — Coppa Hamba JA496c 

Angelo, v.— Golden Gate JA584g 

Baker, E. A. and C. D. — Reading for Children, 

3 vols JB1692r 

Baker, E. M.— The Shadow of Half -moon Pass JB1684s 

Baker, N. B.— Inca Gold JB1683i 

Bannon, L. — Manuela's Birthday JB219m 

Barbour, R. H.— Heading North JB239he 

Bartlett, A. C.— 4th Cowboy JB2891f 

Baum, L. F.— The Wizard of Oz JB347w 

Blake, G.— The Mystery of the Silver Chain JB636m 

Boyd, P. M.— .Mike JB789m 

Bracker, C. E.— Chester JB797c 

Bragg, M. C— The Little Engine That Could JB8131 

Brier, H. M. — Skycruiser JB853s 

Brodersen, L. — The Green One JB8641g 

Burglon, N.— Lost Island JB9561 

Cameron, M.— El Pueblo JC182e 

Carroll, R. and L.— Flight of the Silver Bird JC3193f 

Chapin, H. — The Adventures of Johnny Appleseed. . . . JC463a 

Coatsworth, E.— Five Bushel Farm JC652f 

Cooke, A. 0. — A Day in a Shipyard JC7721d 

Cooke, A. 0. — A Day in An Ironworks JC7721da 

Cooke, A. 0. — A Day With Leatherworkers JC7721db 

Cooke, A. 0.— A Visit to a Woolen Mill JC7721v 

Cooke, A. 0.— A Visit to a Cotton Mill JC7721vi 

Cooke, A. 0.— A Visit to a Coal Mine JC7721vj 



—69— 

Cornelius, L. — Plays For Girls and Boys JC813p 

Crownfield, G.— Cristina of Old New York. JC953c 

Gory, D.— Hawk Eye JC833h 

Cory, D.— Lone Star JC8331o 

Cory, D.— Haven Wing JC833ra 

Cory, D.— Red Feather JC833r 

Cory, D.— Star Maiden JC833s 

Daugherty, J. — Daniel Boone . . . JD2381d 

D'Aulaire, I. and E.— Abraham Lincoln JD2394a 

Davis, L. R.—Hobby Horse Hill JD262h 

DeAngeli, M.— Skippjack School JD283s 

Deihl, E. G.— Holiday-time Stories JD324h 

Dixon, F. W. — Footprints Under the Window JD621f 

Dixon, F. W. — A Figure in Hiding JD621fi 

Dixon, F. W.— The Great Airport Mystery. . JD621g 

Dixon, F. W.— The Hidden Harbor Mystery JD621hi 

Dixon, F. W.— The House on the Cliffs . JD621ho 

Dixon, F. W. — The Missing Chums JD621m 

Dixon, F. W.— The Mark on the Door . JD621ma 

Dixon, F. W. — The Mystery of Cabin Island JD621my 

Dixon, F. W.— The Secret of the Caves JD621sf 

Dixon, F. W.— The Tower Treasure. JD621t 

Dixon, F. W.— While the Clock Ticked. JD621w 

Dunaway, A. B. — Joystone Manor ............... . JD8971J 

Dyer and Brady — Merrill Third Reader JD9961m 

Eaton, W. P.— Boy Scouts in Death Valley JE14bu 

Firman and Maltby— The Winston Readers, 2 vols. . . . JF524w 

Fleming, W. — The Pigmy's Arrow JF598p 

Ford, C. A.— The Little Girl Who Waved JF6991 

Fyieman, R.— The Katy Kruse Play Book JF997k 

Gaggin, E. R. — An Ear for Uncle Emil JG134e 

Garthwaite, J. — Skipper Jack . JG244s 

Goldsmith, M.— Old Mother Earth and Her Children. . JG624o 
Gordon, D. — Dorothy Gordon's Treasure Bag of 

Game Songs • . . JG6622d 

Hendrick, E. P.— The 7th Scout JH4981s 

Heyward, DuB. — The Country Bunny JH6221c 

Hickey, T. F. W.— Bulldog Sheila JH628b 



—70— 

Hilles, H. T.— A Mile of Freedom JH652m 

Hodel, E.— This Way to the Circus JH687t 

Hooper, J. — The Circus Boat JH786c 

Hoyt, v.— Song Dog JH869so 

Huntington, H. E. — Let's Go Outdoors JH9511 

James, W. — The Adventures of Luisa in Mexico JJ291a 

Johnson, M. S. and H. L.— The Story of Rickey JJ681s 

Keene, C. — By the Light of the Study Lamp JK26by 

Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 
Keene 



C— The Circle of Footprints JK26c 

C— The Clue in the Cobweb JK26cl 

C— The Clue in the Dairy JK26cm 

C— The Clue of the Tapping Heels JK26cs 

C— The Clue of the Broken Locket JK26ct 

C— In the Shadow of the Tower JK26i 

C— The Message in the Hollow Oak JK26me 

C. — The Mystery of the Ivory Charm JK26my 

C. — Nancy's Mysterious Letter JK26n 

C. — The Password to Larkspur Lane . JK26p 

C. — Secret of Redgate Farm JK26se 

C. — Secret at the Hermitage JK26sf 

C. — Secret at Lone Tree Cottage JK26sg 

C. — Secret at Shadow Ranch JK26sh 

C. — A Three-cornered Mystery JK26t 

C— The Whispering Statue JK26w 

Kelland, C. B.— Mark Tidd in the Backwoods. .... . JK291me 

Kelly, E. P. and Hoffman, C— A Girl Who Would 

Be Queen JK294g 

Kerigan, F. — June's Quest JK39j 

Knatchbull and Hugesson — The Princess With the 

Pea-green Nose , . JK671p 

Knox, E. M.— Swift Flies the Falcon JK742s 

Kummer, F. A. — Leif Erikson, the Lucky JK961 

Lederer, C. — The Eagle's Quest JL473e 

Lewis, L — Jubilee JL674J 

Lewis, W. D.— Pioneer Trails Book JL679p 

Lewis, W. D.— Scouting Through, Book 5 JL677s 

Long, M. T.— Skipper Dee Skee JL8491s 

Lovell — Gray Bird, a Little Plains Indian JL899g 



—71— 

Lovell — Leaping Trout, a Little Iroquois Boy JL8991 

Lovell — Winona, a Little Indian of the Prairies JL899w 

Lowe, V. R. — The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc JL913b 

Lyons, K. — The Vagabond Scouts JL991v 

Machetang, F. — Panuck, Eskimo Sled Dog JM149p 

Mackinstry, E.— The Fairy Alphabet JM1581f 

McKown, G. and Gleeson, F. S. — All the Days 

Were Antonia^s JM1592a 

Major, W. M. (Ed.)— Patriotic Stories JM2341p 

Mallette, G. E.— No Vacancies JM253n 

Massey, M. — The Adventures of a Boy Magician JM416a 

Medary, M.— Joan and the Three Deer JM479 j 

Miller, 0. B.— Heroes, Outlaws and Funny Fellows. . JM6493h 

Moon, G.— Solita JMBlSso 

Nolan, J. C.— Hobnailed Boots JN788h 

Paine, R. D. — First Down, Kentucky . . JP146fi 

Parton, E. — Runaway Prentice JP274r 

Purnell, T.— The Merry Frogs JP985m 

Reid, L.— Miss Carlotta JR356m 

Riley, J. W.— The Raggedy Man JR573r 

Robinson, M. L. — Runner of the Mountain Tops J9A262r 

Sari— The White Goat JS243w 

Schmidt, S. L.— The Secret of Silver Peak . JS354s 

Seivwright, J. — Castle Secrets . JS462c 

Skidmore, H. — River Rising . . ..... . JS6281r 

Slifer and Crittenden — The Picture Quiz Book 

for Juniors .*....... JS633p 

Spencer, C. — Three Sisters JS754t 

Sperry, A. — Lost Lagoon, a Pacific Adventure JS7511o 

Spyri, J. — Heidi Grows Up JS772he 

Stoddard, W. 0. — The Talking Leaves JS869t 

Stone, A. W. — Goin-on-nine JS8772g 

Streatfield, N. — Circus Shoes . JS914c 

Striker, F. — The Lone Ranger JS9161 

Striker, F. — The Lone Ranger and the Gold Robbery. . JS9161o 
Striker, F. — The Lone Ranger and the 

Mystery Ranch JS9161p 

Tallant, E.— The Girl Who Was Marge JT147g 



—72— 

Teichner, M. — Knitting Grasshopper JT262k 

Theiss, L. E.— Wings Over the Andes JT376wi 

Theiss, L. E.— Wings Over the Pacific JT376wk 

Tompkins, W. M. — Two Sailors and Their Voyage 

Around Cape Horn JT662t 

Van Doren, M. — A Pony Named Nubbins JV2462p 

Van Vrooman, M. — Ju-Ju and His Friends JV284J 

Varble, R. M.— Julia Ann JV287J 

Watters, G. and Courtis, S. A. — A Picture Dictionary . JW344p 

Wike, M. B. — Snowbirds and Crows JW663s 

Williamson, M. — John and Bettyj's History Visit JW731J 

Wriston, H. T. — Camping Down at Highgate JW955c 

REFERENCE 

Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts, 1938. 
Copy of the Roster of Isaac Davis Post, G. A. R. 
Journal of the House of Representatives of Mass., 1938. 
Journal of the Senate of Mass., 1938. 
Manual for the General Court of Mass., 1939-40. 
Proceedings Encampment of the G. A. R., 1939. 
Proceedings Veterans of Foreign Wars, 1938. 
Proceedings Encampment of Mass. U. S. W. V., 1938. 
Proceedings Encampment of Mass. G. A. R., 1938. 
Proceedings American Legion, 1938. 
Report of the Smithsonian Institute, 1938. 



—73— 



Report of Inspector of Animals 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for 
the year 1939 : 

Cows 381 

Young Cattle 76 

Bulls 22 

Oxen 2 

Swine 907 

Goats 14 

Sheep 14 

Dogs Quarantined 6 

Rabies: None. 

Barns Inspected 66 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



Elizabeth White Fund 



The Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund have signed 
orders to the Treasurer of the Town of Acton, amounting to 
three hundred seventy-five dollars ($375.00) for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1939. 

This money has been given to worthy citizens of Acton 
after careful investigation and consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CLARA SAWYER, 

Trustees of the Eizabeth White Fund. 



—74— 



Report of the Dog Officer 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I submit herewith my report, as Dog Officer, covering 
work done for the year 1939 : 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law . 56 
Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance 

with law 11 

Total number of dogs handled 67 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 27 

Warnings to delinquent dog owners to get licenses . . 121 

Appropriation $225.00 

56 dogs at $3.00 for six days' board 168.00 

56 dogs at $1.00 for disposal 56.00 

Total for board and disposal $224.00 

Gentlemen : 

I, therefore, recommend that the appropriation for the 
year 1940 be the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 
Dog Officer. 



—75- 



Report of the Town Nurse 



The Board of Health 
Acton, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report as public health nurse for 
year ending Dec. 31, 1939. Nursing service was as follows : 

Bedside nursing 1,624 

Welfare calls 297 

Pre-natal calls 146 

Post-natal calls 189 

Child welfare calls 238 

Social service calls 19 

With the exception of several cases of measles in the South 
area and scarlet fever in the West section, we have had no 
severe community illness. These cases were principally among 
children of school age. Colds have been very prevalent in low- 
er grades. 

It is hoped that the Clinic for diphtheria prevention will 
be held again this Spring. At the last Clinic 132 doses of Tox- 
oid were given. This program of immunization is for pre- 
school as well as school children. A Schick test was made be- 
fore Toxoid was given. 

At the Middlesex County Sanatorium 21 cases were ex- 
amined and 4 cases were re-examined. Every patient examined 
had an x-ray taken of the chest. If this showed disease, the 
patient was examined, diagnosed, and report sent to the Doc- 
tor. This service is offered to the community without charge 
in an effort to detect tuberculosis by an early examination. 

I wish to thank those who have made contributions to the 
nursing service, of clothing and other materials. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. GREELEY, R. N. 



—76— 



Report of the Board of Health 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The Board of Health of Acton herewith submits the fol- 
lowing report for the year ending December 31, 1939. 

The duties of this board are increasing constantly. It has 
been necessary to meet each month, the second Tuesday of each 
month being the time set for the transacting of business per- 
taining to the good health of the town. There also have been 
two special meetings called during the year. 

This town has been free from a serious run of communi- 
cable diseases during the past year, only a few isolated cases 
having been reported, and the general health and health con- 
ditions of the town are good, as is the commonwealth as a 
Vv^hole, as brought out in a report recently received and which 
was issued by Dr. Jakmauh of the State Department of Health. 

As usual, the heavy expenses of the board during the past 
year have been in the maintenance of the Town Dump. Our 
agent suggests that the citizens of the town who have occasion 
to use the dump could assist us greatly by using care when 
dumping rubbish, etc., by dumping as far back as possible 
and being sure to dump over the edge, thereby saving the ex- 
pense of rehandling and clearing the surface. 

At the diphtheria immunization clinic, carried on in the 
schools in charge of the school physician. Dr. E. A. May ell, 
two of the members of our board assisted, Dr. 0. L. Clark and 
Mrs. Lillian Taylor. Bills for their services were presented to 
the Board of Selectmen but were rejected through the strict 
interpretation of the law and could not be paid except by vote 
of the town. Therefore, an article to cover these bills was en- 
tered in the warrant for a recent special town meeting and 
according to law, in order for the members of this board to 
receive pay for services it will be necessary to place an article 
in a warrant for a town meeting to cover such services when 



—11^ 

rendered. 

The amount of money collected by the nurse and agent 
of the board and turned in to the town treasurer this year is 
$306.25. This sum should be credited to the appropriation of 
this department as in the treasurer's report it goes into a gen- 
eral fund and does not show as being returned against our 
appropriation. 

The state and county also reimburses the town for money 
expended for vaccine and in certain other cases, which return 
goes into the general fund and does not appear as a credit 
against our appropriation. Therefore, the maintenance of the 
board is much less than would appear from the accounting of 
the appropriation for the Town Nurse and Board of Health. 

Burial permits issued 20 

Residents who died in other towns .... 8 
Total deaths recorded 28 

Record of contagious diseases, January 1, 1939 - January 
1, 1940: 

Dog-bite 6 

Scarlet Fever 6 

Diphtheria 1 

Measles 9 

Syphilis 2 



24 
Deaths: none 
Your Board requests the continued support of the people 
in their endeavor to carry on the necessary work for the best 
interests of the town as a whole. 

We would recommend the appropriation of $1,200.00 next 
year, the same as last, to carry on the necessary work of the 
Board. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Dr. 0. L. CLARK, Chairman, 
LOWELL H. CRAM, Sec-Clerk, 
LILLIAN TAYLOR 
ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, Agent. 



—78- 



Report of Tax Collector 



1937 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $9,836.84 

Interest 706.68 



$10,543.52 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $10,094.56 

Abated 393.30 

Tax Titles 55.66 

$10,543.52 

1938 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $34,410.01 

Interest 689.09 



$35,099.10 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $23,107.11 

Abated 114.20 

Tax Titles 102.95 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 11,774.84 

$35,099.10 

1939 TOWN TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $88,643.80 

Interest Collected 38.19 

$88,681.99 



—79— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $56,536.63 

Abated 1,839.88 

Tax Titles 588.70 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 29,716.78 

$88,681.99 

1939 PERSONAL TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $11,477.48 

Interest ....... .^ , 2.91 

$11,480.39 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $9,711.41 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 1,768.98 

$11,480.39 

1937 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $152.00 

Interest 10.31 

Cost 20.65 

$182.96 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $150.96 

Abated 32.00 

$182.96 

1938 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $256.00 

Interest 2.89 



—so- 
Cost 17.85 



$276.74 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $138.74 

Abated 22.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 116.00 



$276.74 
1939 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Gommitted $1,840.00 

Cost 33.25 



$1,873.25 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,393.25 

Abated 164.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 316.00 

$1,873.25 

1936 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 
Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $96.90 

$96.90 

Cr. 
Abated $96.90 

1937 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $1,059.65 

Interest 78.75 

$1,138.40 



—81— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $849.54 

Abated . 106.21 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 182.65 



$1,138.40 

1938 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1939 $404.31 

Interest 3.14 



$407.45 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $339.71 

Abated 55.49 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 . 12.25 



$407.45 

1939 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $7,789.23 

Interest 1.38 

$7,790.61 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $6,608.44 

Abated 181.24 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 1,000.93 

$7,790.61 



—82— 

SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
JANUARY 1, 1940 

Total Debits 

1937 Town Tax $10,543.52 

1938 Town Tax 35,099.10 

1939 Town Tax , , 88,681.99 

1939 Personal Tax 11,480.39 

1936 Excise Tax 96.90 

1937 Excise Tax 1,138.40 

1938 Excise Tax 407.45 

1939 Excise Tax 7,790.61 

1937 Poll Tax 182.96 

1938 Poll Tax 276.74 

1939 Poll Tax 1,873.25 

$157,571.31 

Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $108,930.35 

Abated '. 3,005.22 

Tax Titles 747.31 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1940 44,888.43 



$157,571.31 



CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes. 



Superintendent of Town Forests 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Town Forests in Massachusetts and the United States are 
increasing in size and numbers rapidly because of the sound- 
ness of the idea and the realization on the part of the people 
that we must take steps now to start putting our future forest 
policy on a firm basis. Forest products are being put to an in- 



—83— 

creasing number of uses. We in Acton should start to increase 
the size of our Town Forest and to take better care of what 
we now have. 

The first move is for your board to place its management 
in the hands of a Town Forest Committee as provided in G. L., 
C. P21. 

We will welcome bequests or gifts of land which can be 
added to our Town Forest to be used for park, recreational, 
bird-life santuaries and forestry purposes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, 

Superintendent of Town Forests. 
January, 1940. 



Forest Warden's Report 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Your Forest Warden submits the report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1939. 

Total number of fires responded to 30 

Out of Town calls 2 

Total labor cost of extinguishing . $403.41 

Total property lost in dollars and cents. . . . $540.00 

The Forest Fire truck and equipment are in good con- 
dition. 

As we were able to buy 1,100 feet of new forest fire hose 
this year, I think that this will carry us through the coming 
year. We were very lucky in having a small amount of fires 
and now that the W. P. A. have done a great deal in cleaning 
up the damage done by the storm, I feel that we are almost 
back to normal conditions and that our greatest worries are 
over. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



-84- 



Fire Department 



January 26, 1940. 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1939. 

The total number of alarms responded to by the entire 
department are as follows : 

Buildings, 3; Automobile, 1; Chimney, 17; False, None; 
Emergency, None ; Out of Town, 2 ; Oil Heaters, 2 ; Misc., 2. 
Total Labor cost of extinguishing . . $91.10 

Property Loss $1,500.00 

The Fire Department equipment is in good condition, and 
due to the fact that we had very few fires, and what we did 
have being very small, enabled us to buy quite a lot of new 
hose and equipment, therefore I feel it will not be necessary 
to raise additional money for hose this coming year. 

I very strongly recommend preparing for the coming dial 
Telephone System. By that I mean that the South and Center 
alarm system would be very inadequate when the dial tele- 
phone goes into effect. I feel that money should be appro- 
priated this year to take care of the existing condition in 
South Acton, that being the most serious. 

By correcting South Acton this year and Acton Center 
next year, I feel it would be much easier than trying to do it 
all at one time. With this done we will have all three stations 
prepared when the telephone is changed to dial system, and 
then some arrangement can be made with the Telephone Com- 
pany to send in the alarms. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



Welfare Department Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Board of Public Welfare is 
hereby submitted. 

This year we are deviating from the usual form in re- 
porting the activities of this department and we submit it in 
the form of statistics, which we feel will give the citizens of 
Acton a clearer insight as to the kind and amounts of relief. 
Although conditions, as they pertain to General Relief or 
Temporary Aid, improved somewhat during the year, thereby 
reducing this expense noticeably, we are still far from any 
general recovery and we must plan accordingly. 

Temporary Aid is as the name signifies. The cost of this 
type of aid is governed entirely by employment conditions, 
excepting in those cases which are unemployable. Aid to 
Dependent Children and Old Age Assistance come under 
Social Security and are participated in by both the Federal 
Government and the Commonwealth. Budgets are submitted 
to the State six months in advance, and in order that we may 
participate in the money given out by the Federal Govern- 
ment as Federal Grants, it is compulsory that a sufficient 
amount of money be appropriated to cover anticipated re- 
quirements at least for that period of time. 

Starting as of January 1, 1940, the Federal Government 
has increased the amount of their participation to fifty per 
cent (50%) on amounts not exceeding $40 per month under 
Old Age Assistance, and fifty per cent (50%) instead of one- 
third of amounts expended under Aid to Dependent Children 
up to specified amounts, which are governed by the number of 
children in the family. This, however, will not materially 
affect our budget requirements for the coming year. 

During December, 1939, arrangements were completed 



-86- 



with the Federal Surplus Commodities Division, whereby per- 
sons, who are eligible, can go to the Federal Surplus Commod- 
ities warehouse at Marlboro and obtain such articles of cloth- 
ing and food as are available. 



Temporary Aid 

Case Load : Cases 

December 31, 1938 17 

December 31, 1939 17 

CASES AIDED, 1939 

Acton Settled 24 

Other Settlements — Unsettled 12 

Acton Settled — In other places 12 



Total Aid 

Employables 

Unemployables 

Acton cases — out of town . 

Unsettled 

Out of Town Settled 

Approximate Cost to Acton 

Food 

Fuel and Light 

Clothing 

Medical 

Hospitalization 

Cash 

Rent 

Miscellaneous 



48 

$3,757.40 
2,675.40 
1,335.69 

$1,358.60 
684.88 



$2,534.14 

642.58 

64.83 

246.85 

87.00 

1,670.50 

1,148.27 

38.63 



Individuals 
72 
56 

77 
53 
55 



185 
$7,768.49 



$7,768.49 



2,043.48 
$5,725.01 



Case Load 
December 31, 1938 



$6,432.80 

Old Age Assistance 

Cases 



Cases 
78 



—87— 

Added during year 16 

Closed during year 16 

December 31, 1939 78 

Acton cases in other towns 12 

Out of Town and Unsettled Cases in Acton 16 

Appropriations $14,700.00 

Federal Grants 12,623.00 



$27,323.00 

Cash Disbursements . $26,635.13 

Acton Cases in Other Towns 383.63 



$27,018.76 



Aid to Dependent Children 

Case Load Case Cases Individuals 

December 31, 1938 5 15 

Added during year 1 

Closed during year 1 

December 31, 1939 5 15 

Cash Disbursements $3,118.35 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
RAYMOND L. HATCH, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



Department of Public Welfare 

Appropriations recommended for 1940 : 

Old Age Assistance $15,500.00 

Temporary Aid 7,500.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,200.00 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



—88— 



Report of Finance Committee 



Your Committee on Finance respectfully submits the 
following recommendations for the ensuing year: 



Highways : 

Village . . . 
Chapter 81 
Chapter 90 



$1,450.00 
8,550.00 
2,000.00 



Schools 

Street Lighting 

Memorial Library, current expenses including 

branch service 

Memorial Library, books 

Hydrant Service 

General Government 

Buildings and Grounds 

Cemeteries 

Military Aid 

State Aid 

Soldiers' Relief 

Police Department 

Board of Health 

Welfare, Temporary Aid 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance 

Snow Removal 

Tree Warden, Article 25 

Unclassified 

Notes and Bonds 

Interest on Bonds and Notes 

Interest on Revenue Loans 

Memorial Day, Article 5 

Fire Department, Article 6 

Forest Fires 



$12,000.00 

47,000.00 

3,750.00 

1,300.00 

200.00 

3,403.00 

7,200.00 

1,500.00 

1,900.00 

800.00 

240.00 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 

1,200.00 

7,500.00 

2,200.00 

15,500.00 

700.00 
400.00 

5,500.00 
300.00 
200.00 
275.00 

2,800.00 
500.00 



—so- 
Gypsy Moth Work, Article 24 » 1,200.00 

Liability Insurance, Article 8 1,000.00 

Premium on Town Officers' Bonds, Article 9 . . . . 300.00 

Public Health Nurse, salary. Article 11 2,000.00 

Public Health Nurse, expenses. Article 11 200.00 

County Hospital, maintenance. Article 14 1,085.00 

Redemption Tax Titles, Article 26 100.00 

Jones Community Field, South Acton, Article 15 300.00 

Expenses of Dog Officer, Article 27 230.00 

Work Relief, Article 12 5,000.00 

Article 16, Recommend the appropriation of $500.00 for this 
work. 

Article 17, Recommend the appropriation of $700.00 for new 
whistle and necessary equipment for fire alarm at South 
Acton fire house. Balance of program be completed next 
year. 

Article 18, Recommend if Town approves of this article that 
expense be paid from school budget. 

Article 22, Recommend appropriating $264.24 to pay these 
bills. 

Article 23, Recommend a committee of three be appointed by 
the Moderator to act with School Committee and report 
at next Town meeting. 

Article 28, Recommend the transfer from Machinery fund 
the sum of $600.00 to Machinery account. 
Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,900.00 for Cem- 
eteries, $1,600.00 to be raised and $300.00 transferred 
from Cemetery Land Fund. 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,500.00 from 
Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 

Precinct 1. Murray Brown, Alden C. Flagg 
Precinct 2. Howard J. Billings, William T. Merriam 
Precinct 3. Webster S. Blanchard, Alfred W. Davis 

Finance Committee 



—90— 

' Treasurer's Report 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1939. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1939 $29,184.99 

Receipts for 1939 : 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Highways $15,708.23 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 13,043.73 

Aid Dependent Children, Federal . . 712.50 

Old Age Assistance 9,175.41 

Income Tax 9,540.00 

Highways, Chap. 232 7,877.01 

Temporary Aid 30.75 

Aid Dependent Children 109.66 

Reimbursement, Loss on Taxes .... 581.58 

Tuition, Children 632.62 

Training Schools 261.92 

Income Tax, Chap. 362 99.96 

Business Corporation Tax 7,109.14 

Veteransf Exemption 51.75 

State Aid 415.00 

Military Aid 45.00 

Transportation — Temporary Aid . . 1,207.02 

Welfare 837.91 

$67,439.19 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Highways . $2,966.33 

Dog Refund 681.09 

Highways (Main St.) 1,372,24 

Highways (School St.) 269.70 

Dog Officer (reimbursement) .... 200.00 

$5,489.36 



—91— 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee, 
Collector of Taxes : 

Town Taxes, 1937 ... $10,094.56 

Excise Taxes, 1937 849.54 

Poll Taxes, 1937 150.96 

Town Taxes, 1938 23,107.11 

Excise Taxes, 1938 339.71 

Poll Taxes, 1938 138.74 

Town Taxes, 1939 .... . 66,248.04 

Excise Taxes, 1939 6,608.44 

Poll Taxes, 1939 1,393.25 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Tames J. Mahoney, License $125.00 

iVarren Davis, License 125.00 

Lockwood, Inc., License 125.00 

Harold Robblee, License 125.00 

Alfred Casassa, License 125.00 

McNiff Inc., License 125.00 

Rodolph Clouette, License 200.00 

Roy MacKinnon, License 200.00 

Selectmen, Licenses 60.00 

Wendall Davis, Snow Plow 4.50 

Board of Health, Milk Permits ... 29.00 
Board of Health, Alcohol Permit . . 2.00 
Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines . . . 41.03 
Horace F. Tuttle, Dog Licenses .... 785.60 
Horace F. Tuttle, Lots Sold Wood- 
lawn . 145.00 

Town of Maynard, Welfare 499.64 

Board of Health, Garbage Permits. 17.00 

Board of Health, Swine Permit . . . 1.00 

Director of Standards, Licenses . . . 40.00 

Concord District Court, Fines 88.46 

Edward Stanley, Tax Title 328.60 

Edward Stanley, Interest 57.71 

Board of Health, Nurse Services . . . 263.25 



$108,930.35 



—92— 

Boston & Maine R.R., Snow Removal 3.00 

Fred Kennedy, Lumber Sold 10.00 

Fred Kennedy, Rent Low. Device . 57.00 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 319.00 

0. D. Wood, Rent of Hall 37.75 

Estate Charles Polep, Tax Title . . 549.73 

Estate Charles Polep, Interest .... 158.10 

Town of Acton, Machinery Account 513.65 

Grace J. Cullinane, Tax Title 423.07 

Grace J. Cullinane, Interest 19.08 

Soldier's Relief, Reimbursement . . . 70.00 

0. D. Wood, Dances 175.00 

Merchants' National Bank, Loan . . 25,000.00 

Merchants' National Bank, Loan . . 15,000.00 

Town of Arlington, Old Age Asst. 60.00 

Town of Maynard, Old Age Asst. . 14.83 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition 1,995.69 

Town of Westford, Tuition 218.02 

City of Maiden, Old Age Asst 60.00 

Town of Stow, Old Age Asst 60.00 

Arthur Raymond, Tax Title 455.73 

Arthur Raymond, Interest 59.14 

John L. and Manuel Bloomxberg, Tax 

Title 921.99 

John L. and Manuel Bloomberg, Int. 8.60 
Eliz. B. Richardson and Heirs, Tax 

Title 51.30 

Eliz. B. Richardson and Heirs, Int. . 17.09 

0. D. Wood, Sheehan Reunion 7.00 

Fred Kennedy, Lots Sold Mt. Hope . 13.00 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations 47.75 

Work Relief Fund, Sale of Iron .... .50 

Town of Orange, Welfare 72.34 

Town of Concord, Land Tax 25.12 

Clare Milbery, Sealer Weights 79.64 

Acton Grange, No. 259, Rent Hall . . 42.25 

Laffin's Garage, Machinery Account • 2.50 

Town of Concord, Welfare 185.18 



—OS- 
Julian De Cordova, Library 1.00 

Frank and Sumner Teele, Tax Title 1,347.24 

Frank and Sumner Teele, Interest . 230.93 

Horace F. Tuttle, Lumber Sold . . . 140.00 

Fred Kennedy, Care of Lots 51.00 

Board of Health, Ice Cream License 5.00 

Chief of Police, Revolver Permits . 5.50 

Town of Winchester, Welfare ..... 35.00 

City of Leominster, Old Age Asst, . 31.63 

Lauri Saisa, Damages 14.15 

Transfer, Wilde Memorial Library . 285.69 

Transfer,Cemetery Fund 1,615.47 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer Fd. 1,999.12 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund ....... 25.00 

Transfer, Cemetery Surplus 225.27 

Carrie M. Durkee, Cert. Fees 9.00 

Cancelled Checks 78.85 

$56,345.69 

Total Cash Receipts $238,204.59 

Cash Balance January 1, 1939 29,184.99 

Sum Total for 1939 $267,389.58 

Payments in 1939 : 

Selectmen's Orders $219,198.70 

State Taxes 10,610.22 

$229,808.92 



Cash Balance December 31, 1939 . . . $37,580.66 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 
Departmental Equipment Loan, Note 149, Due 

Aug. 1, 1940 $1,500.00 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 156, Due June 

26, 1940 25,000.00 

High School Bonds, Due 1940 to 1945 9,000.00 



—94— 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 
Balance January 1, 1939 : 

Principal Fund $82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 182.63 

$82,421.58 

Received Interest: 

North Middlesex Savings $75.00 

Franklin Inst. Savings 75.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings . 62.50 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 89.05 

Athol Savings 75.00 

Arlington Five Cent Savings 90.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings 75.00 

Leominster Savings 75.00 

Worcester North Savings 100.00 

Cambridge Savings 87.50 

Hudson Savings 125.00 

Marlboro Savings , 123.75 

Waltham Savings 100.00 

East Cambridge Savings 75.00 

Andover Savings 100.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings ... 112.50 

Home Savings 60.00 

Lexington Savings 100.00 

Farmers and Mechanics Savings . . 112.50 

Winchendon Savings 150.00 

Medford Savings 75.00 

Wildey Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . 25.17 

$2,052.97 



$84,474.55 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Andover Savings $4,000.00 

Arlington Savings 4,000.00 

Athol Savings 3,000.00 



-9^' 



D- 



Boston Five Cent Savings . 2,000.00 

Cambridge Savings 3,500.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 5,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 3,000.00 

Farmers and Mechanics Savings ... 5,000.00 

Franklin Inst. Savings 3,000.00 

Home Savings 3,000.00 

Hudson Savings 5,000.00 

Leominster Savings 3,000.00 

Lexington Savings 4,000.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 4,500.00 

Medford Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,238.95 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . 236.48 

North Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,000.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings . 3,000.00 

Waltham Savings 4,000.00 

Wildey Savings 2,500.00 

Winchendon Savings 5,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 4,000.00 

Transfer to Town Account 



$82,475.43 
1,999.12 



CEMETERY FUNDS 
Balance January 1, 1939 : 
Principal Fund $40,487.21 



Unexpended Balance 



Received for Perpetual Care: 
Fred P. Brooks, Lot, Woodlawn . . 
James A. Brown, Lot, Woodlawn 
Mrs. Forest Bean, Lot, Woodlawn 
Raliegh Beach, Lot, Mt. Hope . . . 

J. B. Lane, Lot, Woodlawn 

Ada I. Marshall, Lot, Woodlawn 



4,228.98 



$50.00 
100.00 
150.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



$84,474.55 



$44,716.19 



$600.00 



—96— 

Received Interest : 

North Middlesex Savings . $161.36 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 95.57 

Athol Savings , 26.26 

Worcester North Savings 25.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 37.50 

Assabet Inst. Savings 7.50 

Hudson Savings 60.00 

Marlboro Savings 60.50 

East Cambridge Savings 50.00 

Maynard Trust Co 64.50 

Worcester North Savings 25.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 44.00 

Suffolk Savings 30.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 33.75 

Gharlestown Five Cent Savings .... 6.25 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 33.75 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 6.13 

Home Savings 20.00 

West and South Water Bonds 66.00 

Central Savings 20.00 

Goodnow Fund 20.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (Income) . . . 38.36 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . 91.58 

Assabet Inst. Savings 17.49 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Assabet Inst. Savings $1,564.15 

Athol Savings 1,050.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Central Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 1,500.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 250.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 300.00 



$1,080.50 
$46,396.69 



-97— 



Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 1,500.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Home Savings 1,000.00 

Hudson Savings 2,400.00 

Marlboro Savings 2,500.00 

Maynard Trust Co 3,228.96 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Income) . 2,684.11 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,475.00 

North Middlesex Inst. Savings .... 6,454.00 

Suffolk Savings 3,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,200.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 1,375.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 300.00 

West and South Water Bonds 1,500.00 

Transfer to Town Account 



$44,781.22 
1,615.47 



$46,396.69 



Note: West and South Water Bond, 
redeemed funds deposited in 
the Marlboro Savings Bank. 
($300.00) 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Balance January 1, 1939 : 

Principal Fund $25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 823.39 

Received Interest : 

Athol Savings $50.00 

Amherst Savings 55.00 

Worcester North Savings 25.00 

North Middlesex Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 55.00 

Lawrence Savings 50.00 



$25,823.39 



—98— 

Worcester Five Cent Savings ..... 50.00 

Marlboro Savings 55.00 

Waltham Savings 50.00 

East Cambridge Savings 50.00 

Andover Savings 50.00 

Charlestov/n Five Cent Savings . . . 45.00 

Lowell Savings 40.00 

Hudson Savings (Income) 16.64 

North Middlesex Savings (Income) 9.23 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Amherst Savings $2,000.00 

Andover Savings 2,000.00 

Athol Savings 2,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 2,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Hudson Savings (Income) 640.00 

Lawrence Savings 2,000.00 

Lowell Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 2,000.00 

Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings , 2,000.00 

Waltham Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings (Income) 459.26 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 1,000.00 



$650.87 



$26,474.26 



$26,099.26 

Paid Trusteed Orders for 1939 375.00 



$26,474.26 



WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1939 : 

Principal Fund $9,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 534.83 



—99— 

Susan Augusta & Luther Conant Fd. 1,000.00 

Hiram Hapgood Fund 200.00 

Luke Tuttle Fund 200.00 

John W. Heald Fund 893.34 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 2,238.31 

Minnie Davis Fund 336.50 



Received Interest: 

West Shore R. R. Bond $40.00 

Massachusetts Savings 20.00 

City Inst. Savings 20.00 

Cambridge Savings . 8.40 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 27.50 

Warren Inst. Savings 40.00 

Home Savings 20.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings ... 67.50 

Cambridge Savings (Hosmer) .... 56.31 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Heald) . . 22.46 

Maynard Trust Co. (Income) 19.86 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Cambridge Savings $2,294.62 

Cambridge Savings 336.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 3,000.00 

City Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Home Savings . 1,000.00 

Massachusetts Savings 1,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 915.80 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Maynard Trust Co 400.00 

Maynard Trust Co. (Income) 512.40 



$14,402.98 



$342.03 
$14,745.01 



—100— 
West Shore R. R. Bond 1,000.00 



$14,459.32 

Transfer to Town Account 285.69 



$14,745.01 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1939 : 

Principal Fund $12,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 293.20 

Received Interest: 

North Middlesex Savings $50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 55.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 37.50 

Marlboro Savings 82.50 

Hudson Savings 25.00 

Lexington Savings 50.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (Income) . . . 7.25 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Hudson Savings $1,000.00 

Lexington Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (Income) . . . 255.45 



$12,293.20 



$307.25 



$12,600.45 



$12,255.45 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1939 .... 345.00 



$12,600.45 



—101— 

LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1939 : 
To Balance $1,498.55 

Received Interest: 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . $2.49 

Qharlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 6.45 

Massachusetts Savings . 20.16 

Warren Inst. Savings 1.99 

31.09 



$1,529.64 



Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . $112.94 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings . . . 292.01 

Massachusetts Savings 998.73 

Warren Inst. Savings 100.96 

$1,504.64 

Transfer to Town Account 25.00 

$1,529.64 

CEMETERY SURPLUS 
Balance January 1, 1939 : 
To Balance $1,173.52 

Received Interest: 
Assabet Inst. Savings $30.15 30.15 

$1,203.67 

Balance December 31, 1939 : 

Assabet Inst. Savings $978.40 

Transfer to Town Account 225.27 

$1,203.67 



—102— 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1939: 
To Balance $581.87 

Received Interest: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings $14.62 14.62 



$596.49 

Balance December 31, 1939 
Middlesex Inst. Savings $596.49 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1939 : 

Principal Fund $1,415.00 

Unexpended Balance 62.34 

$1,477.34 

Received to Fund : 

Company Salaries $230.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (Interest) 37.63 

267.63 

$1,744.97 

Balance December 31, 1939: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings $1,744.97 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



—103— 



Report of the Town Accountant 



January 30, 1940 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report covering the financial 
transactions of the town for the year ended December 31, 
1939. I am submitting again this year a comparative balance 
sheet and you will notice a considerable improvement in the 
financial condition of the town over the previous year, viz : 

Cash on hand increased $8,395.67. Revenue loans de- 
creased — amount, $10,000.00. Overlay Surplus increased 
$1,092.36. Surplus Revenue increased $6,032.94. A large 
part of the increase of the Surplus Revenue was on account 
of the redemption of tax titles. Amount received the past 
year was $4,077.66; amount added to Tax Titles was $747.31, 
leaving a balance of $3,330.35 to Surplus Account. The fixed 
debt is now $10,500, a decrease of $5,500 over the preceding 
year. The town will have to raise $5,500 this year, which will 
bring the account down to $5,000 that Will mature $1,000 
yearly from 1941-45. 

I feel that the citizens will be pleased with the financial 
condition of the town as set forth by the balance sheet. 

AUDITING 
I have audited the books of the tax collector and verified 
the cash on hand and in the bank. Notices were mailed to 
delinquents during the past year. I have audited the books 
of the treasurer, reconciled the bank balance, checked and 
verified the several trust funds in his custody. I have verified 
the funds in the custody of the trustees. • 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



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—110— 

Cash Receipts and Departmental Expenditures 

RECEIPTS 

Treasurer's Receipts $238,204.59 

(See Treasurer's itemized report) 
Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1939 29,184.99 



Expenditures 
General Government 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

James E. Kinsley, Chairman, salary $250.00 

Ralph W. Piper, salary 200.00 

Raymond F. Durkee, salary 200.00 

Virginia Milbery, Clerk 636.00 

Virginia Milbery, postage 39.00 

Virginia Milbery, P. 0. box rent, 

stationery 1.35 

Sanderson's, stationery 4.55 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., licenses, sta- 
tionery 8.24 

Jas. E. Kinsley, expenses attending 

meetings 29.51 

Assn. of Town Finance Committees 

Membership 10.00 

Memorial Press, Town Reports .... 300.80 
Middlesex County Selectmen's Assn. 

Memberships 6.00 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Carrie M. Durkee, salary $1,000.00 

Carrie M. Durkee, postage 105.60 

Carrie M. Durkee, telephone 1.90 

Carrie M. Durkee, tax title exp. . . 16.46 
Carrie M. Durkee, carfare to Cam- 
bridge, recording deeds ........ 4.60 



$267,389.58 



$1,685.45 



-111- 



Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 23.66 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 41.40 

Robinson Seal Co., forms 9.27 



ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT 

Albert P. Durkee, salary $300.00 

Henry L. Haynes, salary 300.00 

Carl C. Flint, salary 250.00 

Lloyd W. Priest, salary 66.67 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books, forms 72.84 
Geo. R. Barnstead & Son, tax cards 1.00 
L. L. Applin, transfer cards, exam- 
ining records 20.54 

Henry L. Haynes, attend'g meetings 20.00 

Carl C. Flint, attending meetings . . 20.00 

Albert P. Durkee, attend'g meetings 15.00 



TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT 

William Henrj^ Soar, salary $500.00 

William Henry Soar, postage .... 139.17 

William Henry Soar, telephone ... 11.80 

William Henry Soar. cert, notes . . 4.00 

William Henry Soar, tax title exp. 3.50 

William Henry Soar, stationery . . 6.40 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books .... 12.59 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 15.68 

Greenwood Typewriter Exchange, 

cleaning and adjusting 7.50 

Maynard Trust Co., rent Safe De- 
posit Box 5.50 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Howard L. Jones, salary $400.00 

Howard L. Jones^ postage 12.00 

Howard L. Jones, carfare to Boston 1.10 



$1,202.89 



$1,066.05 



$706.14 



—112— 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books, sta- 
tionery ' 18.88 

Murphy & Snyder, notices 4.25 

$436.23 

TOWN CLERK 

Horace F. Tuttle, salary $200.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording vital 

statistics 71.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, telephone 16.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, postage 18.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes, letter- 
heads 7.69 

Hobbs &. Warren, Inc., loose-leaf 

holders 4.21 

$316.90 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Clare A. Milbery, salary $200.00 

Clare A. Milbery, attending confer- 
ence 8.00 

Clare A. Milbery, postage, telephone, 

measure 1.24 

Municipal Supply Co., tags, book, 

seals 11.15 

Acton Motor Co., transportation . . . 2.00 

$222.39 

PUBLIC WELFARE 
Carl E. Backman, chairman, salary $125.00 

Raymond L. Hatch 75.00 

Mary M. Laffin 75.00 

$275.00 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Dr. 0. L. Clark, chairman, salary . $25.00 

Dr. 0. L. Clark, postage, telephone 1.50 

Lillian F. Taylor, salary 10.00 

Lowell H. Cram, salary 15.00 

$51.50 



—US- 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF AGENT 

Waldo J. Flint, salary $50.00 

Waldo J. Flint, travel expense .... 15.36 
Mass. Soldiers' Relief Assn., mem- 
bership 2.00 

CATTLE INSPECTOR 
E. E. Allsopp, salary 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 

Clare A. Milbery, listing $88.20 

Horace F. Tuttle, Clerk, Registrar of 

Voters 25.00 

Arthur W. Lee, registrar 20.00 

Arthur W. Lee, listing 21.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, registrar 20.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, listing 57.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, recount 2.00 

George E. Murphy, officer . 3.00 

Peter Duggan, officer 3.00 

Havelock Schnair, officer 3.00 

Frank McDonald, officer 3.00 

Fannie E. Davis, officer 3.00 

Clare Milbery, officer 3.00 

Clarence Robbins, officer 3.00 

Thomas Murray, officer 3.00 

Sophie Walsh 3.00 

Samuel Knowlton, officer 3.00 

James A. Wayne, officer 3.00 

Paul Coughlin, officer 3.00 

James Coughlin, officer 3.00 

Wilmot E. Taylor, officer 3.00 

Wm. B. Feeley, registrar 20.00 

Wm. B. Feeley, listing 11.40 

Albert P. Durkee, moderator 15.00 

Michael Foley, posting warrants . . 10.00 

Thomas Groom & Co., Inc., forms . . 10.50 



$67.36 



$125.00 



—114- 



Robinson Seal Co., cards, binders 
L. C. Hastings, placing booths . 
William Lawrence, placing booths 
0. D. Wood, placing booths .... 
West Acton Women's Club, rent 
Murphy & Snyder, printing . . . 
News-Enterprise Co., advertising 
News-Enterprise Co., street books 



42.28 
1.25 
1.00 
1.75 

15.00 

63.91 
3.00 

90.00 



$560.29 



Total General Government 



$6,715.20 



BONDS 
Maryland Casualty Co., Dep. Col- 
lector bond $10.00 

C. A. Durkee Ins. Agency, collector, 
treasurer clerks' bonds 243.00 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Oliver D. Wood, janitor $196.65 

Oliver D. Wood, labor on grounds . 28.50 

Oliver D. Wood, repairs 4.40 

Oliver D. Wood, care of clock .... 52.00 

Oliver D. Wood, wood 33.00 

Oliver D. Wood, paid for chair seats 6.05 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal . 90.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 85.51 

Boston Edison Co 166.41 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., oil 218.66 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 22.12 

East Acton Garage, gas, oil 11.20 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber supplies 63.57 

A. W. Davis Co., supplies 11.30 

Simon D. Taylor, supplies 4.01 

A. C. Gravlin, wood 19.00 

Charles Farris, labor on grounds . . 61.50 

D. E. Boatman, supplies 2.55 



$253.00 



—US- 
Frank E. Fiske, labor ............ 23.00 

Allen Ghair Corp, chair parts 2.81 

Ernest A. Knipple, repairing settees, 

glazing windows 93.12 

Parker Hardware Co., hardware . . .86 

Christian Jensen, patching ceiling . 4.00 

Wilho Anderson, teaming ashes .... 2.00 

B. A. King, electrical repairs 8.10 

Irving S. Dunn, teaming ashes .... 2.00 

George H. Reed, fertilizer — seed . . 23.13 

Frank Braman, truck 15.00 

West & South Water Supply District 12.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas .83 

Samuel Knowlton, painting Acton 

Fire House 76.00 

Malcolm Fullonton, painting South 

Fire House 67.25 

David Clayton, labor 4.00 

George Morse, truck 5.00 

Acton Motor Co., welding 1.50 

Hayward & Fullonton, sharpening 

mower 7.10 

Pay roll, labor $32, truck $10 42.00 

Wilson Lumber Co., pipe 3.63 

William Cahill, rolling grounds .... 4.00 

George Noyes Est., loam 1.00 

A. L. Freese, repairs 2.85 

Walter Taylor, care lot at E. Acton . 10.00 

Commonwealth of Mass., boiler insp. 10.00 
E. R. Sanborn, repairing West Fire 

House , 13.28 

W. A. Freeman Co., labor on boiler . 10.15 

Wilho Anderson, repairing boiler . . 4.13 

So. Acton Woolen Co., boiler tube . . 4.75 

Arthur Wayne, labor on grounds . . 65.75 

Arthur Wayne, gas .75 

Mathias Andreasen, rep. chimney . . 9.15 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe fittings 5.06 



-116- 



N. H. Tenney, radiator valves, labor 4.90 

Fred S. Kennedy, care of Common 

at West Acton 7.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Michael Foley, salary and trans. . . . $2,100.00 

Robert Willett, services 46.50 

George Braman, services 84.19 

Benjamin Sawyer, services 19.50 

Louis Leveroni, services 18.00 

Norman Perkins, services 20.63 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 63.34 

Ralph Rogers, services 6.50 

M. Linsky & Bros., uniform and cap 44.25 

Town Shop, ledger 1.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, stationery, 

supplies 2.15 

Acton Pharmacy, batteries 4.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes, letter 

and billheads 18.03 

Jacob Stoler, notary service 12.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Pay Rolls, annual $460.00 

Pay Rolls, fires , 131.50 

William Lawrence, janitor 120.00 

Iver Peterson, janitor 120.00 

Lyle Reynolds, janitor 120.00 

J. G. Flynn, towel service 12.00 

George H. Reed, coal 208.46 

George H. Reed, rope 1.85 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal . 118.97 

Morse Oil Co., gas, freezone 14.89 

West & South Water Supply 36.00 

John Pederson, gas 5.20 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 92.29 



$1,623.03 j 



$2,440.09 



—117— 

Boston Edison Co 182.49 

Gorham Fire Equipment Co., hose, 

equipment 578.50 

A. W. Davis Co., coal, supplies .... 111.74 
Belmont Supply Co., boots, gloves, 

etc 33.51 

Justin A. McCarthy Co., nozzle, sup- 
plies 60.41 

Jean Garceau, v^ork on water cans . 5.55 

Town Shop, gloves 3.15 

Dorothy Davis, cards, envelopes ... 20.50 
Samuel Knowlton, rubber matting . 3.75 
Louis W. Bills, changing box, repair- 
ing wires 14.00 

S. D. Taylor, supplies .23 

Seagrave Corporation 1.80 

William King, tissue «... 2.25 

Arno Perkins, wood 4.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, gloves 1.00 

W. J. Gallagher, polish .50 

Hayward & Fullonton, labor, sup- 
plies on whistles 24.15 

Earl F. Hayward, inspection systems 

on whistles 8.25 

A. C. Gravlin, wood . 4.00 

R. S. Baker, gas 1.25 

So. Acton Woolen Co., gas 1.49 

Bursaw Gas & Coil Co., oil 1.95 

J. S. Moore, supplies 1.40 

Wendell Putnam., Jr., ladder, crow 

bar 10.85 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., paint, brush . . 3.74 

Clarence Bobbins, teaming ashes . . 6.00 

James H. Connolly, gloves 2.28 

M. Fullonton & Geo. Hayward, re- 
pairing ladders 12.00 

American LaFrance Foamite Corp., 

chimfix, gun, liquid 20.77 



—118— 

Acton Motor Co., gas, oil 32.11 

Batteries 43.40 

Inspections 4.60 

Labor, parts .... 36.75 

Polish .85 



FOREST FIRES 

Pay Rolls $450.15 

John Pederson, gas, oil, spark plugs 4.93 
Fitzhenry — Guptill Co,, parts for 

pump 15.58 

Acton Motor Co., welding, insp 11.00 

F. W. Putnam, Jr., supplies 25.50 



MOTH DEPARTMENT 

James J. Knight, labor $232.50 

James J. Knight, truck 96.88 

James J. Knight, twine, oil, tel., 

bolts, etc 3.55 

David Clayton, labor 60.75 

Hugh Hodgen, labor 48.75 

George Morse, labor 65.25 

Harold Knight, labor 112.75 

J. Hurley, labor 113.50 

J. Bradley, labor 113.50 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 39.74 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 2.00 



$2,680.38 



$507.16 



NEW HOSE 
Justin A. McCarthy Co., hose, span- 
ners $496.35 

HYDRANTS 

West & South Water Supply District $2,875.00 
Town of Concord 253.00 

$3,128.00 



—119— 

Montgomery Hardware Co., lead . . . 288.73 
Acton Motor Co., labor, charging 

battery 2.50 

Fitzhenry — Guptill Co., parts 2.25 

George W. Logan, D. & D 15.00 

James J. Knight, attending meeting 2.30 



TREE 


WARDEN 




James J. Knight, labor . . . 




$159.00 


James J. Knight, truck . . . 




66.25 


James J. Knight, attending meeting 


2.30 


Hugh Hodgen, labor 




102.75 


Hugh Hodgen, truck ...... 




47.63 


Harold Knight, labor 




84.75 


George Morse, labor 




3.75 


George Morse, truck 




5.00 


J. Hurley, labor 




108.25 


David Clayton, labor 




44.00 


George Butler, labor 




41.50 


H. E. Day, sharpening .... 




6.55 


E. P. Gates, tree irons 




21.50 


Morse Oil Co., gas, grease . 




2.25 


J. S. Moore, wedges, brushes. 


, pails . 


1.90 


Parker Hardware Co., extension bit 


2.25 



HEALTH 

Ernest E. Allsop, labor at dump . . $195.25 
Ernest E. Allsop, inspections and 

investigations 21.60 

Ernest E. Allsop, quarantining . . . 10.50 

Team 8.00 

Permits 12.25 

Burying dead ani- 
mals, etc. . . 6.50 
Tel, and postage 1.30 
Joseph Perry, labor at dump 305.00 



$1,199.95 



$699.63 



—120— 

William Munn, inspecting hogs . . . 2.60 
Gorham Fire Equip. Co., new shaft 

for pump 8.75 

Acton Motor Co., gas, lab. on motor 10.00 

Dr. E. A. Mayell, prof, services .... 63.00 

Central Garage, labor on pump .... 1.50 

Strong's Market, supplies .76 

E. R. Sanborn, labor 24.00 

George H. Reed, shovel 1.50 

E. P. Gates, irons 1.50 

Dr. Paul Gates, prof, services 25.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 33.70 

E. R. Squibb & Sons, vaccine 7.00 

Acton Pipe Co., labor on pump .... 5.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., licenses .... .90 
Dr. 0. L. Clark, prof, services and 

inspections 68.00 

Lillian F. Taylor, prof, services ... 13.00 



TOWN NURSE 

Genevieve J. Greeley, services and 

transportation $2,000.00 

Acton Pharmacy, supplies 50.87 

Thomas W. Reed Co., supplies 11.75 



HIGHWAYS 

Village 

Acton Granite Co., stone and inlets $84.22 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 17.66 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 32.74 

J. S. Moore, paint, brushes 36.65 

A. W. Davis Co., paint 10.20 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., kerosene ... .50 

Edna Downey, sand 1.40 

Morse Oil Co., gas .50 



$826.61 



$2,062.62 



—121— 

E. P. Gates, drilling 1.00 

Town Shop, cambric .30 

R. H. Newell Co., stripping sand pit 40.25 

Hedge & Matthers Co., brooms .... 2.45 

Margaret Spinney, gravel 11.40 

Cypras Kazokas, bags 1.40 

Acton Motor Co., cutting pipe .... 1.00 

State Prison, frames and grates . . . 25.65 

Kelley Coal Co., brick 11.50 

Parker Hardware, bolts, etc 6.73 

Conant Machine Co., steel, welding 7.58 

M. I. Houghton Co., sawing 1.00 

Arthur Fraser, gravel .10 

Traffic & Road Equipment Co., steel 

brooms 12.00 

$306.23 

Labor 

Albert H. Perkins, Supt $9.00 

William Kazokas, Supt. 118.00 

Henry Stone 41.00 

George Rugg 21.00 

William Kelley 43.75 

James Johnston 35.00 

David Clayton . 19.00 

Thomas Murray 18.00 

James Bradley 20.00 

Joseph Lemoine 8.00 

Edward McGuire 32.00 

Herbert Owen 6.00 

Jahner Jarvi 30.00 

Alex Duby 24.00 

William Charter 33.60 

Emile Noterman, Jr 13.00 

George Downey 4.00 

David Tuttle 4.00 

William Bradley 16.00 



—122— 
Arthur Hurley . 2.00 



$497.35 

Trucks and Equipment 

E. A. Anderson $12.00 

Wilho Anderson 29.50 

George Morse 66.38 

Levi Perkins 22.00 

Clarence Bobbins 22.00 

Hosea Gould 32.00 

Carrie Kingsley 57.00 

Albert Gravlin 22.00 

Arthur Jalonen 12.00 

Ralph Jones 22.00 

George Reed 12.00 

Leonard Smith, shovel 33.75 



$342.63 $1,146.21 



Chapter 81 

Margaret Spinney, gravel $185.20 

Edna Downey, sand 64.20 

Standard Oil of Nevv^ York, asphalt 4,486.26 

State Prison, grates and frames . . . 69.83 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, cement 99.46 

Arthur Eraser, gravel 9.80 

Kelley Sales Corp., brick 12.00 

Ormal Laffin, gravel 6.00 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone .... 490.21 
No. Middlesex Washed Sand & 

Gravel Co 12.71 

George H. Reed, cement . 24.50 

Ida Gagnon, gravel .30 

Am. Cy. & Chemical Co., caps ..... 3.75 

Nev^ England Metal Culvert Co. ... 41.34 

Acton Pipe Co 2.20 

Berger Metal Culvert Co 388.08 



—123— 



R. J. Rodday Co., pea gravel 
State Prison Colony, posts . . 



42.00 
101.70 



Labor 

Albert H. Perkins, Supt 

William Kazokas, Supt 

Henry Stone • . . . 

Alexander Duby . 

James Johnston 

George Rugg 

William Kelley 

Lester Stiles . . . 

Alex Morrison . . . 

Robert Willett 

David Clayton , 

George Richardson, Jr. . 

Thomas Murray 

James Bradley 

Edward McGuire . 

George Charter 

Joseph Lemoine 

George Anderson 

David Tuttle 

George Larrabee 

Herbert Owen 

J. Hurley 

Emile Noterman, Jr 

Will Charter 

Louise Leveroni 

George Downey 

William Bradley 

J. Jarvi 

George Butler 



$6,039.54 



$200.25 

1,040.00 

534.75 

79.75 

506.00 

508.00 

469.50 

69.50 

35.50 

89.00 

77.00 

81.75 

22.00 

309.00 

374.50 

8.00 

140.25 

3.00 

85.50 

70.05 

220.25 

92.50 

237.75 

116.25 

1.25 

106.25 

97.50 

23.75 

36.50 



$5,635.30 



—124— 

Trucks and Equipment 

Hosea Gould $522.51 

George Morse 493.25 

A. Jalonen 573.39 

Clarence Robbins 531.76 

Wilho Anderson 590.89 

Carrie Kinsley 496.76 

Levi Perkins 499.63 

Ralph Jones 482.63 

Albert Gravelin 480.50 

Jesse Briggs 45.63 

George Reed 69.75 

A. W. Davis Co 15.75 

Leonard Smith 39.75 

Leonard Smith, compressor 60.50 

Leonard Smith, shovel 678.75 

Town of Acton, equipment 444.15 



$6,025.60 $17,700.44 



Chapter 90, Maintenance 

Kelley Sales Corp., brick $26.00 

George H. Reed, cement 21.00 

Margaret Spinney, gravel .20 

Edna Downey, sand 56.40 

Standard Oil of New York, asphalt . 2,111.43 

State Prison, grates and frames . . . 37.05 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., cement 7.55 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone 89.10 

New England Concrete Pipe Corp., 

sewer pipe 141.12 



$2,489.85 



Labor 

William Kazokas, Supt $295.00 

James Bradley 127.00 

J. Hurley ..... 143.75 



—125— 

Emile Noterman, Jr 125.25 

Henry Stone 141.25 

Robert Willett , 96.50 

David Clayton 115.50 

James Johnston 153.00 

William Kelley 141.50 

Edward McGuire 142.00 

George Rugg 84.50 

George Richardson, Jr 60.00 

Herbert Owen 56.75 

Will Charter 41.80 

Alexander Duby 42.50 

William Bradley 43.25 

J, Jarvi 40.00 



$1,849.55 

Trucks and Equipment 

Wilho Anderson . . , $233.26 

A. C. Gravlin 132.51 

George Morse 138.13 

Hosea Gould 133.13 

A. Jalonen 176.25 

Ralph Jones 177.50 

Carrie Kinsley 112.75 

Clarence Robbins 176.00 

Levi Perkins 105.63 

Jesse Briggs 7.50 

Leonard Smith, compressor 38.50 

Leonard Smith, shovel 161.25 

Town of Acton, equipment 69.50 



$1,661.91 $6,001.31 



Machmery Account 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas, oil $124.53 

George H. Reed, tools 9.30 

Acton Motor Co., repairs 12.15 



■126- 



E. P. Gates, hone 87.75 

E. P. Gates, repairs 57.60 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 36.85 

E. W. Systrom Co., blade . .... 36.00 

Parker Hardware Co., tools 8.17 

Conant Machine & Steel Co., repairs, 

parts . 2.86 

C. C. Cullinane, express 1.10 

Hedge & Matthews, root cutter . . . 52.50 

Hedge & Matthews, tools and parts 86.88 

Railway Express, express .67 

Buffalo Springfield Roller Co., parts 15.15 

Pierce's Express .50 

Oberg's, boots 8.00 

Dyer Sales & Machinery Co., wicks 1.92 

Edward Cheney, drills 1.00 

Security Fence Co., chains and bar, 

bolts 9.64 



SNOW REMOVAL 

Ploughing 

John Pederson $793.00 

Levi W. Perkins 304.50 

A. W. Davis . 300.00 

George H. Reed 202.50 

Edwin Christofferson 358.14 



$1,958.14 



$552.57 



Sanding and Cleaning Villages (Putting up and Removing 

Snoiu Fences) 

Labor . $1,317.75 

Trucks 957.65 

Edna Downey, sand 69.60 

Road Builders Supply Co 50.96 



$2,395.96 



—127— 

Sundry Items 

George H. Reed, shovels, labor $6.00 

A. W. Davis, installing plough .... 12.00 

A. W. Davis, paint ,shovels 7.95 

J. S. Moore, shovels 1.80 

E, P. Gates, v^ork on ploughs 4.50 

Robert Willett, work and parts on 

sand spreaders 30.35 

Wm, P. Proctor Co., enamel 1.22 

E. W. Systrom Co., new plough .... 190.00 
Anderson Engineering Co., plough 

edge 10.00 

C. C. Cullinane, express . .70 

Conant Machine & Steel Co., bolts, 

labor 7.85 

Hosea Gould, belt for spreader 3.00 

Lewis E. Tracy Co., belt and chain . 4.51 

William Kazokas, belt 5.91 

Levi Perkins, installing plow 15.00 

George H. Reed, sander 45.00 



$345.79 $4,699.89 

STREET LIGHTING 
Boston Edison Co $3,506.35 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Temporary Aid $6,267.25 

City of Boston 547.87 

Town of Boxborough 6.88 

Town of Westford 302.48 

Town of Hudson 39.30 

Town of Maynard 201.05 

' City of Leominster 105.58 

City of Waltham 7.25 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., blanks 3.31 

$7,480.97 



■128- 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 
Orders of the Board of Pub. Welfare $3,136.43 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 
Orders of the Supervisor of Old Age 

Assistance $26,635.13 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT 

Carl E. Backman, salary, travel, ex- 
pense, telephone $446.22 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., bills 16.44 

$462.66 

Soldiers' Benefits 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF 

Orders of the Soldiers' Relief Agent $2,334,50 

MILITARY AID 
Paid $410.00 

STATE AID 
Paid . $420.00 

EDUCATION 

Orders of the School Committee . . $47,071.61 

(See itemized report) 

LIBRARY MAINTENANCE 

Arthur F. Davis, librarian $151.50 

Arthur F. Davis, rebinding books . 45.25 

Arthur F. Davis, v^riting cards . . . 11.91 

Arthur F. Davis, cataloging 10.00 

Arthur F. Davis, postage 1.22 

Mrs. 0. D. Wood, asst. librarian .... 101.00 

Ralph Rogers, janitor 151.50 

Ralph Rogers, lights and repairs . . 2.00 

Boston Edison Co. . 42.38 

News — Enterprise Co., labels 10.25 



—129— 

Chester B. Robbins, insurance 49.71 

West & South Water Supply District 12.00 

Parker Hardware Co .40 

Charles Farris, labor 1.00 

Simon D. Taylor, supplies .88 

Remington Rand Co., daters, ink, pad 2.80 

Boston Cons. Gas Co 256.62 



LIBRARY BOOKS 

H. R. Huntting Co $118.69 

Jean Karr Co 31.14 

Junior Literary Guild 55.50 

DeWolfe Fiske Co. 90.08 

Wm. A. Wilde Co 17.84 

New England News Co 47.53 

Follett Book Co 29.20 

Savings Bank Life Ins. Council .... 1.95 

George H. B. Turner 2.00 

Harold A. Sandstrom 3.00 

Union Library Assn 21.11 

Encyclopedia Brittanica 1.45 

News - Enterprise Co 1.50 

Herman Goldberger Agency 45.70 

Julian de Cordova 3.00 

Ernest H. Washburn 16.00 



BRANCH LIBRARY 

Ida Costello, librarian $95.00 

Ida Costello, transporting books ... 11.00 

Ida Costello, attending fires 2.55 

Boston Edison Co 22.10 

Maynard & Acton Oil Co 14.10 

Nashoba Oil Co 4.24 

Ralph Anderson, librarian 104.00 

Ralph Anderson, transport'g books . 4.00 
Ralph Anderson, fixing oil burner, 



$850.42 



$485.69 



—ISO- 



cleaning curtains, oiling floors 



6.05 



$263.04 



CEMETERIES 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor $490.32 

Fred S. Kennedy, horse 6.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, postage, telephone 7.20 

Fred W. Green, labor 28.77 

Fred W. Green, horse 4.00 

Duncan Kennedy, labor 293.25 

Elwin H. Hollowell, labor 215.95 

Elwin H. Hollowell, tools 3.00 

Elwin H. Hollowell, postage 4.50 

Howard Jones, labor 164.00 

H. H. Hollowell, labor 12.00 

Charles F. Farris, labor 4.00 

W. Coolidge, labor 3.20 

Joseph Gallant, labor 6.00 

Boston Edison Co 5.88 

West & South Water Supply 45.75 

George H. Reed, tools, cement, fer- 
tilizer 59.45 

Thomas J. Grey Co., seed 15.20 

A. W. Davis Co., paint, cement, 

trucking 17.22 

Sudbury Nurseries 8.90 

Holmerden Co., weed killer 52.95 

James J. Knight, spraying 19.85 

Albert Jenks, spraying 2.85 

Laffin's Express 1.40 

Chester Robbins, insurance 56.25 

Spaulding Moss Co., blueprints .... 2.80 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 5.25 

George Cahoon, sharpening mowers 7.00 

Levi W. Perkins, stone 3.00 

John Pederson, loan, express 4.50 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe, fittings, labor . 15.61 

Albert Batley & Son, flowers .... 31.12 



—131— 

F. W. Bulette, team . 15.00 

Avery & Murphy, labor on mower . . 1.40 

Holland's Garage, gas 1.70 

E. P. Gates, repairing mowers .... 15.00 
Horace F. Tuttle, selling 10 lots, 

writing, recording deeds 10.00 

Compiling account of money received 

and expended on account of the 

several lots under perpetual care . 15.00 



SUSAN HOSMER FUND 

Fred W. Green, labor $3.75 

Fred S. Kennedy 46.00 

Duncan Kennedy 45.00 

Elwin Hollowell 330.00 

Howard Jones 268.50 

Greenough Bros., Inc., removing 

stumps, filling holes 512.13 

Greenough Bros., Inc., 186 yds. loam 

spread 251.50 

Levi W. Perkins, manure 200.00 

Hosea Gould, loading and hauling 

loam 100.50 

Eraser Kennels, loam 60.00 

Thomas G. Gray, seed, scythe 72.00 

A. W. Davis Co., fuses .25 

George H. Reed, cement 3.75 

E. L. Willard, humus 10.00 

Laffin's Express .75 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe fittings, labor . 15.03 

Frank Bulette, team 29.00 

John Pederson, express 2.00 

Sidney N. Schurcliiff, prof, services 48.96 

PERPETUAL CARE 

Fred W. Green, labor $25.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 306.26 



$1,655.27 



$1,999.12 



—132— 



Duncan Kennedy, labor . 259.75 

Elwin H. Hollowell, labor 420.00 

Howard Jones, labor . 329.00 

Harry Hollowell, labor 4.00 

W. Coolidge, labor 3.20 

Charles Farris, labor 8.00 

George H. Reed, fertilizer 120.06 

Herman Parker, care of lot 8.00 

Bartlett & Dow Co., sprinklers .... 33.50 

Albert Batley & Son, flowers 78.70 

Acton Monumental Co., cleaning 

stones 20.00 

BLANCHARD FUND 
Fred S. Kennedy 

CEMETERY SURPLUS 

Thomas Groom & Co., Inc., 2 record 
books 

HURRICANE DAMAGE 

Fred S. Kennedy $15.72 

Duncan Kennedy 6.00 

Howard Jones 3.00 

WORK RELIEF 

H. E. Day, sharpening saws $13.05 

E. P. Gates, tree irons 8.25 

James Higgins & Son, creosote .... 29.16 

Athol Motor Express, express 3.10 

Treas. U. S. A. music project 18.00 

James J. Knight, express, pole .... 1.20 

Samuel Cabot, healing paint 7.06 

Eraser Kennels, gravel 44.40 

Acton Pharmacy, drinking cups .... 1.50 
James E. Kinsley, carfare, attending 

meeting .86 



$1,615.47 



$25.00 



$20.00 



$24.72 



—IBS- 
Frost Insecticide Co., brushes, saws, 

poles 28.74 

A. W. Davis Co., poles, saw blades . . 6.60 

News - Enterprise Co., easement 

forms 3.25 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., brushes .98 

PAY ROLLS 

Labor $647.90 

Trucks 587.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 

Dorothy Davis, cards $1.75 

South Acton News Co., refreshments 31.30 

Town Shop, flags 20.25 

Lovell Bus Lines, busses 30.00 

Newton Post No. 48, Am. Legion 

Band 100.00 

Gerald H. Finan, plants, wreaths . . 56.70 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., paint, brushes . 3.10 



$1,401.05 



$243.10 



LIABILITY INSURANCE 
Theron Lowden, premium $913.95 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Howard A. Wilson, legal services . . $225.00 

John J. Donahue, legal services .... 30.00 

News - Enterprise Co., adv 4.48 

Flora Kilmartin, curtain damaged . . 1.00 
Horace F. Tuttle, surveying, writing 

releases 15.00 

So. Acton Dept. Store, flags 16.90 

C. A. Durkee Ins. Agency, Treas- 
urer's bond acct. trust funds .... 35.00 

$327.38 



—134— 

JONES COMiMUNITY FIELD 

Chester M. Savatelle, tractor $55.00 

Central Welding Co., roller frame . . 7.40 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 12.06 

George H. Reed, poultry netting . . . 15.60 

Ralph Jones, loam 6.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, spikes . 10.37 

Morse Oil Co., gas 16.40 

Eden Cahill, labor 96.25 

Eden Cahill, brads, loops .75 

William Cahill, labor 29.25 

Jesse Reynolds, labor 1.50 

John Bradley 16.00 



REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES 

Wm. Henry Soar, expenses to Cam- 
bridge Registry of Deeds and 

Boston Land Court $7.50 

Howard Wilson, prof, services .... 74.30 



$266.58 



$81.80 



DOG OFFICER 
Eraser Kennels $224.00 

NOTES AND BONDS 
Merchants' National Bank High 

School Bonds $4,000.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, Fire Equip. Notes . 1,500.00 

$5,500.00 



INTEREST ON NOTES AND BONDS 
Merchants' National Bank, High 

School Bonds $520.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, Fire Equip. Notes 52.50 

$572.50 



—IBS- 
INTEREST ON REVENUE LOANS 
Merchants' National Bank $143.75 

COUNTY HOSPITAL ASSESSMENT 

County Treasurer $994.23 

1938 BILLS 

GENERAL GOVERN|MENT 

Horace F. Tuttle, salary, recording 
vital statistics, postage, telehpone, 
clerk to registrar of voters $360.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage, tel., note 
fees 22.30 

Daniel Sheehan, registrar of voters 
and recount 22.00 

Estate of Charles A. Durkee, balance 
for collecting 1932-1933, 1934- 
1935 excise taxes 43.87 

E. E. Allsopp, balance salary as cat- 
tle inspector 30.00 

$478.17 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., oil $10.25 

0. D. Wood, janitor 19.25 

0. D. Wood, care of clock and flag . 57.00 

0. D. Wood, labor on grounds .... 7.00 

A. W. Davis Co., v^ax 1.20 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Pay roll $8.00 

J. G. Flynn, towel service 1.00 

Louis W. Bills, rep. fire alarm box . . 6.00 



$94.70 



$15.00 



—136— 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. E. Allsop, labor at dump $70.00 

E. E. Allsop, burial, milk, alcohol 

permits, recording diseases 11.85 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 3.42 



$85.27 



TOWN NURSE 
Acton Pharmacy, supplies $26.74 

HIGHWAYS 

Margaret Spinney, gravel $2.60 

State Prison, frame and cover 16.65 



$19.25 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

Town of Westford $160.96 

Town of Maynard 61.79 

City of Leominster 29.95 

Temporary Aid 294.74 



BRANCH LIBRARY 
Ida Costello, librarian $10.00 



$547.44 

f 

I 



DOG OFFICER 
Fraser Kennels 4.00 

NO APPROPRIATION ITEMS 

Revenue Loans 

Merchants National Bank $50,000.00 

Agency : 

State Tax $10,440.00 

State Auditing 14.11 

State Parks 156.11 

County Tax . 4,985.04 

County Dog Licenses 782.00 

$16,377.26 



—137— 

Refunds 

Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tailings Account , . . , 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance Dec. 31, 1939 . . , 



$64.00 
277.43 


$341.43 
12.50 






$229,808.92 
$37,580.66 


, 


$267,389.58 







STATEMENT OF RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 

Military Aid $320.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 600.00 

General Government 215.20 

Building and Grounds 123.03 

Forest Fires 7.16 

Education 150.00 

Chapter 90, Highways 1.31 

Chapter 81, Highways .44 

Street Lighting 10.00 

1938 Bills 18.87 

$1,446.01 
Unexpended 53.99 

$1,500.00 

STATEMENT OF MACHINERY FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1939 $1,152.48 

Received from Town of Acton .... 513.65 

Received from Laffin's Garage .... 2.50 

$1,668.63 

Transferred to Machinery Acct. . . $700.00 

Balance December 21, 1939 968.63 

$1,668.63 



—IBS- 
STATEMENT OF CEMETERY LAND FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1939 $156.00 

Received from sale of lots 158.00 

Received from sale of lumber .... 150.00 
Unexpended balance Hurricane dam- 
age appropriation .35 

$464.35 

Transferred to Cemetery Account . . $150.00 

Balance December 31, 1939 314.35 

$464.35 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Department 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 




•^^^^®M^ 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1939 



—147- 



Organization 

School Committee 

Mr. Everett Montague, Chairman Term expires 1940 

Mrs. Leland Howe Term expires 1942 

Mr. Samuel Knowlton Term expires 1941 

Mr. Richard Lowden Term expires 1942 

Mrs. Otis Reed Term expires 1941 

Mrs. Oliver Wood Term expires 1940 

Meetings of the School Committee 

Regular meetings of the school committee shall be held 
the first Tuesday of each month in the high school at 7 :30 p.m. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 
Walter F. Hall 

South Acton, Mass. . .Office — High School Building. Tel. 110 

School Physician Dr. Ernest A. Mayell, Acton 

School Nurse Mrs. Genevieve Greeley, West Acton 

Attendance Officer Leonard Godfrey, West Acton 

School Calendar 
January 2, 1940 — All schools reopened. 
February 16, 1940 — All schools close. 
February 26, 1940 — All schools reopen. 
April 12, 1940 — All schools close. 
April 22, 1940 — All schools reopen. 
June 7, 1940 — Grades 1 to 6, inclusive, close. 
June 14, 1940 — Graduation. 
June 21, 1940 — High school closes. 
September 4, 1940 — High school reopens. 
September 9, 1940 — Grades 1-6, inclusive, reopen. 
November 27, 1940 — All schools close at noon. 
December 2, 1940 — All schools reopen. 
December 20, 1940 — All schools close. 
January 2, 1941 — All schools reopen. 



—148— 

Legal Holidays 

January 1, February 22, April 19, May 30, July 4, first 
Monday of September, October 12, November 11, Thanksgiv- 
ing Day, Christmas Day (the day following, when any of those 
mentioned occur on Sunday.) Arbor Day falls on the last 
Saturday in April and is not a legal holiday. Flag Day falls 
on June 14, and is not a legal holiday; it should be observed 
by proper exercises by any school in session on that day. 

NO vSCHOOL SIGNAL— Time 7:15 A. M. (all schools) 
Acton Center, West Acton, and South Acton 2-2-2-2 blasts 

SPECIAL SIGNAL— Time 11:45 A. M. (Grades 1-6) 

All Precincts 2-2-2-2 blasts 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until 
they are 5 years 8 months of age on or before September 1, 
except in the case of those children 5 years 6 months of age 
on September 1 whose mental age and physical condition are 
satisfactory. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first 
two weeks of school. All children entering for the first time 
must present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 514 hours in the ele- 
mentary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with sufficient 
recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to pupils 
except by the principals or persons delegated by the principals. 

3. School Busses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils must 
meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct them- 
selves properly. 



—149— 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They must 
present a written excuse signed by parent or guardian for 
each absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a 
longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws : Chapter 71, Section 55 ; Chapter 76, Section 15 

''A child from a household where a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious 
or contagious disease, or from a household exposed to con- 
tagion from any such disease in another household, shall not 
attend any public school during such illness or exposure until 
the teacher of the school has been furnished with a certificate 
from the local board of health, school physician or from the 
attending physician, stating that danger of conveying such 
disease by such child has passed." 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them 
by the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any 
form of school property. 

8. Fire Drill 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the 
elementary schools and at least once a month in the high school. 



—ISO- 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
As of January 1, 1940 



Center School 



Kal Kansanniva, Prin. 

B. S. E. 
Ruth Berglind 
Charlotte, Laird, B. S. 


f 
E. 


App. 
1938 

1935 
1938 


South School 






Julia McCarthy, Prin. 
Helen Appleby 
Cecelia Callanan, B. S. 
Florence Merriam 


E. 


1906 
1936 
1938 
1927 



Graduate of Home Address 

Fitchburg State College Maynard 



Lesley Normal School 
Fitchburg State College 



Fitchburg Normal 
Lesley Normal School 
Fitchburg State College 
Fitchburg Normal 



South Acton 
South Acton 



South Acton 
Concord 
West Acton 
South Acton 



West School 

Theodore Ehrhardt, Prin., 

B. S., Ed. M. 
Grace Callanan, B. S. E. 
Alice Feehan, B. S. E. 

High School 

Walter F. Hall, Prin., A.B., 

A. M., Ed. M. 
Richard, Greenman 

Asst. Prin., A. B., Ed. M. 
Rebecca Bartlett, B. S. E. 
Elinor Brown, B. S., A. M. 
Margaret Boornazian 
Robert Dolan, A. B., Ed. M. 
Walter Holt, B. S., M. A. 
Henry Hopkinson, L. L. B. 
Marjorie Jones, B. S. 
John Mitchell, B. S. E. 
Eleanor Thompson, B. S. E. 
Marion Towne, A. B. 

Supervisors 

Frank Braman, Drawing 
Arlene Hanson, Phys. Ed., 

B. S. E. 

John Moran, Music 



1938 Bridgewater State Coll. Fairhaven 



1935 
1938 



1935 

1935 

1939 
1939 
1939 
1930 
1928 
1930 
1931 
1939 
1939 
1921 



Fitchburg State College 
Fitchburg State College 



Harvard University 

Harvard University 

Framingham State Coll. 
Mass. State College 
Burdett College 
Clark University 
Dartmouth College 
Northeastern Law 
Simmons College 
Fitchburg State College 
Salem State College 
Smith College 



New School of Design 
B. U. Sargent School 

N. E. Conservatory 



V/est Acton 
South Acton 



South Acton 

Concord 

Worcester 

Leicester 

Methuen 

Marlboro 

East Acton 

West Acton 

South Acton 

Worcester 

Webster 

Concord 



Acton 
South Acton"* 

Newton 



—151— 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Voters of Acton : 

The school committee herewith presents its report for the 
year 1939, together with the report of the superintendent, 
which has been accepted by the committee. 

The duties of the school committee for the past year have 
included maintenance of buildings, transportation of pupils, 
and careful consideration of all school policies. 

Maintenance of Buildings 

Interior conditions were greatly improved in all village 
schools by freshening the walls with light buff paint. In addi- 
tion, the West School was painted two coats outside. Several 
lights were installed in dark stairways and electric base plugs 
were placed for the work of the dental clinic. 

Some concrete work was done at the South School around 
the outside wall and basement entrance. The blinds on the 
Center School v/ere in such poor condition that they were re- 
moved. They have not been replaced because the expense ex- 
ceeded our budget. 

All outside window sashes, frames, and sills were painted 
at the high school. An outside exit from the auditorium was 
replaced as it was rotted by the weather and damaged by per- 
sons seeking to break into the building. 

Recommendations for 1940 

For the coming year, we recommend the following : 

1. That the South and Center Schools be painted if pos- 
sible. 

2. That the quoins and windows of the Center School be 
repaired, as they are in bad condition. 

3. That a new fence be built adjacent to the Sheehan 
property in the rear of the South School, as the old 
one is in danger of falling down. 



—152— 

4. That the right front lawn of the South School be re- 
graded because of unsightly holes left by the removal 
of hurricane-felled trees, and that the driveway be 
filled with gravel to eliminate a very muddy condition. 

5. That the gutters on the front porch and stairway 
treads be replaced where worn and that the supports 
of the fire-escape be reinforced at the South School. 

6. That new gutters and downspouts be installed on the 
rear of the West School. 

7. That the parking area at the rear of the high school 
be further improved by filling, grading, and draining, 
and that outside lights be installed to illuminate the 
area. 

We further recommend that the Mechanical and Manual 
Training Department for boys be enlarged this year. This de- 
partment is being rapidly developed, and it is of great value 
in training our boys for practical trades. At present the avail- 
able space is crowded, and it is easy and desirable to expand 
into the adjacent boys' locker and dressing room. To replace 
the locker room, it is proposed that we build a new room over 
the present boiler room. 

We also recommend that more space be provided for use 
by the girls in their physical education course. At present, 
about thirty-five girls at one time are confined to the use of 
a single narrow toilet room containing only two showers. When 
visiting teams are compelled to share these facilities, condi- 
tions are exceedingly unsatisfactory. To remedy this, it is 
proposed that we build a one-story room for showers and 
lockers on the east rear area adjoining the present girls' dress- 
ing room. 

The matter of installing telephones in the village schools 
has been referred to frequently. It would be a quick way to 
secure a physician in case of serious accident or illness among 
the pupils. It would also greatly aid the superintendent and 
principals in the administration of school affairs. The com- 



—153— 

mittee favors the installation of telephones in these schools, 
but has not had the funds to fulfill the desire. This matter is 
also proposed in a separate article by citizens of the town. 

Transportation 

The contract for the transportation of pupils by busses 
for three years was advertised in June and five bids were sub- 
mitted as follows : 

James Kinsley $5300 per year 

A. W. Davis 5250 per year 

Ormal S. Laff in 5000 per year 

Jesse Briggs 5000 per year 

Russell Hartwell 4800 per year 

The contract was awarded to Ormal S. Laffin for three 
years at $5,000 per year. Mr. Laffin has furnished three busses 
with seating capacities for forty-six pupils each, and has ful- 
filled all other requirements of the committee. Each bus is in- 
sured for public liability up to $100,000, and the contractor 
has furnished a guaranty of service bond. The premium for 
the bond is $112.50, $75.00, and $37.50 for three consecutive 
years, to be paid from our appropriation. The bus service has 
been very satisfactory to date and has been extended in var- 
ious parts of the Town. 

The janitor service in all schools has been well maintained. 
The janitors have been highly co-operative with the committee 
in making minor repairs and preserving the appearance of 
the buildings and grounds. 

The committee requests the same appropriation as for the 
preceding year, namely, $47,000, and expresses its desire to 
make use of any savings effected in a single department to 
improve the general school administration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT N. MONTAGUE, 

Chairman. 



—154— 

COMPARISON OF COSTS FOR OPERATING 

ACTON SCHOOLS 

Mass. School Fund 1939 1938 1937 1936 

Part I 4,030.00 4,066.00 3,990.00 3,886.00 

State Wards 869.58 796.38 866.03 531.72 

4,899.58 4,862.38 4,856.03 4,417.72 



Out-of-town Tuition *2,0'72.83 2,498.19 2,335.58 2,188.66 

6,972.41 7,360.57 7,191.61 6,606.38 
Expended from Approp. 47,071.61 47,098.63 45,994.58 45,998.26 

Net Cost to Town 40,099.20 39,738.06 38,802.97 39,391.88 

Appropriation 47,000.00 47,100.00 46,000.00 46,000.00 

Special Appropriation 3,000.00 1,425.22 

Transferred from 

Reserve Fund 150.00 

47,150.00 

*Approximate amount. Any discrepancy betwen this amount and that in 
treasurer's report is due to the fact that only money received for tuition 
for the year 1938 is included here. 



BUDGET PROPOSED FOR 1940 



Item 1939 1940 

2. Supt. of Schools and General 

Expenses $2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 

3. Supervisors 1,700.00 1,700.00 | 

4. Principals ' 

High 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Elementary 3,600.00 3,800.00 

5. Teachers 

High 15,400.00 15,400.00 

Elementary 7,500.00 7,500.00 

6. Textbooks 700.00 700.00 

7. Stationery and Misc. Supplies.. 1,200.00 1,200.00 j 

8. Wages of Janitors 3,500.00 3,550.00 ^ 

9. Fuel 1,800.00 1,800.00 , 

10. Janitors' Supplies and Power. . . 850.00 850.00 1 

11. Repairs 1,400.00 1,150.00^ 



1 



■155— 



12. Libraries 

13. Health 

14. Transportation 

15. Sundries 

16 & 17. Vocational Education 



50.00 


50.00 


250.00 


300.00 


5,500.00 


5,075.00 


50.00 


75.00 


.00 


350.00 



$47,000.00 $47,000.00 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR SUPPORT FOR 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1939 



General Control 
Salary of Superintendent and General Expenses . $2,499.03 

Expenses of Instruction 

Salaries of Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals : 

Supervisors $1,795.00 

Principal of High School 1,000.08 

Principals of Elem. Schools 3,480.00 

High School Teachers 15,221.80 

Elementary Teachers 7,038.50 



$28,535.38 



High School Textbooks 353.36 

Elementary Textbooks 393.83 

High School Stationery and Supplies. 975.04 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies. 453.17 



$2,175.40 



Expenses of Operation 
High School : 

Wages of Janitor 1,350.00 

Fuel 713.02 

Miscellaneous 640.70 



$2,703.72 



—156— 

Elementary : 

South West Center Total 
Wages of 

Janitor . . $ 722.00 $ 722.00 $ 640.00 $2,084.00 

Fuel 344.88 248.45 253.47 846.80 

Miscellaneous 143.33 105.64 81.62 330.59 

$1,210.21 $1,076.09 $ 975.09 $3,261.39 
Total Expenses of Operation $5,965.11 

Maintenance and Repairs 
High School $523.01 

Elementary South West Center Total 

$286.40 $598.36 $304.57 $1,189.33 

Total Maintenance and Repairs $1,712.34 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health $205.43 

Libraries 45.81 

Transportation 5,427.50 

Vocational Education 414.91 

Miscellaneous 90.70 

$6,184.35 

Total Expended $47,071.61 

Unexpended Balance 78.39 

$47,150.00 

Appropriation $47,000.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund 150.00 



PAID FOR SUPPORT FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1939 

General Control 
Superintendent, Salary and Travelling Expenses. $2,149.92 
Secretary 118.18 



—157— 

Office Expenses : 

Bostitch Boston, Inc., stapler 2.65 

E. Faulkner Conant, census 35.00 

Enterprise Press Inc., 

advertisements 1.50 

Leonard Godfrey, attendance officer 40.00 

Frank Johnson, elem. record cards. 4.15 

Walter Hall, essay prizes ......... 8.00 

M. Linsky & Bros. Inc., 

police badge, etc . 7.25 

Murphy & Snyder, temp, charts, 

registration, report cards, 

financial statements 59.80 

National Educators Society, 

index system 14.25 

Elizabeth Reed, office work 2.55 

Remington Rand Inc., office cards . 1.40 
So. Acton Post Office, envelopes, 

stamps 39.44 

Wright & Potter Printing Co., 

account blanks 11.34 

Yav/man & Erbe, file folders 3.60 

— $230.93 

Total General Control , $2,499.03 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisor's Salary, Drawing 562.50 

Supervisor's Salary, Music 682.50 

Supervisor's Salary, Physical Education 550.00 

$1,795.00 

Principal's Salary, High School $1,000.08 

High School Teachers' Salaries : 

Rebecca Bartlett $400.00 

Kathryn Billman 675.00 

Margaret Boornazian 1,500.00 

Elinor Brown 420.00 

Robert Dolan 1,520.00 



—158— 

George Braman 630.00 

Richard Greenman 1,700.00 

Walter Holt 1,800.00 

Henry Hopkinson 1,700.00 

Marjorie Jones 1,181.80 

Christine Leavitt 630.00 

John Mitchell 400.00 

Mary Stolte 780.00 

Marion Towne 1,450.00 

Eleanor Thompson 400.00 

Elizabeth Clahane, substitute 20.00 

Marion Holt, substitute 10.00 

Louise Price, substitute 5.00 

Principals' Salaries, Elementary: 

Theodore Ehrhardt $1,040.00 

Kal Kansanniva 1,040.00 

Julia McCarthy 1,400.00 

Elementary Teachers' Salaries : 

Helen Appleby 850.00 

Ruth Berglind 950.00 

Cecelia Callanan 850.00 

Grace Callanan 950.00 

Elise Dickerman 720.00 

Kathleen Feehan . 635.00 

Charlotte Laird 820.00 

Florence Merriam 1,245.00 

Gertrude Braman, substitute 4.50 

Jennie Gleason, substitute 5.00 

Florence Nelson, substitute 9.00 



High School Textbooks 

Allyn and Bacon $55.69 

American Book Company 56.06 

Edward E. Babb & Co. Inc 7.81 



$15,221.80 



$3,480.00 



$7,038.50 I 



—159— 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 2.66 

Dura Binding Co 29.05 

Ginn & Company 45.94 

Harper & Bros 2.85 

D. C. Heath & Company 11.03 

International Textbook Co 26.80 

The Macmillan Company 114.42 

South-western Publishing Co. ....... 1.05 



Elementary Textbooks 

American Book Company $3.72 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc 31.06 

Bobbs-Merrill Company 10.97 

D. C. Heath & Company 7.06 

Dura Binding Company 29.05 

Educational Guild of New England . . 2.69 

Ginn & Company 48.01 

Houghton-Mifflin Company 38.22 

Iroquois Publishing Company 2.01 

The Macmillan Company 43.88 

Chas. E. Merrill Company 3.58 

Scott, Foresman & Company 146.55 

Silver, Burdett Company 10.46 

John C. Winston Company 16.57 



High School Stationery and Supplies 

Acton Pharmacy $1.35 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company . . 45.78 

Boston Music Company 18.97 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., fireclay, bricks 2.76 
James W. Brine Co. Inc., 

baseball material 7.75 

Brodhead-Garrett Co., 

Manual Training material ...... 191.46 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc 98.44 



$353.36 



$393.83 



—160— 

B. U. Div. of Teaching Aids, 

film service 10.00 

Milton Bradley Co., drawing supplies 71.99 

Central Scientific Co., lab. supplies . . . 15.13 
Co-operative Test Service, 

history tests 2.50 

A. W. Davis Co., Man. Tr. supplies. . . 26.98 
A. B. Dick Company, 

mimeograph supplies 39.20 

W. B. Case & Sons, burlap, netting. . . 4.03 
Fitchburg Hardware, 

Manual Training supplies 30.36 

E. P. Gates, washers, nuts 1.70 

Giedhili Bros., paper, supplies 65.84 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper, supplies . . 75.48 

Lull & Hartford, baseballs 10.80 

Roy G. Gottschald, music .95 

Henry S. Wolkins Co., paper 56.44 

McKnight & McKnight, Man. Tr 8.56 

Murphy & Snyder, science paper .... 2.75 

National Conservation, pamphlets . . . 4.00 

Papercrafters Inc., paper 7.63 

Parker Hardware 11.59 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co 5.39 

Wrn. P. Proctor Co., Manual Training 18.99 

Sanderson's, cardholders 2.25 

Sawyer's, lumber 62.97 

South-western Publishing Co., 

workbooks 8.00 

Sears, Roebuck & Company 10.20 

Taylor Instrument Companies, 

charts, ink 5.07 

Underwood Elliott Fisher Co. . 37.50 

World Book Company, tests 12.23 



$975.04 



—161— 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc., 

paper, supplies $77.89 

James W. Brine & Co., Inc. 

phys. ed. material 26.26 

Milton Bradley Co., drawing supplies 86.85 
The Classroom Teacher, 

hectograph material 8.86 

Georgia School Book Depository, 

spelling scales .75 

Gledhill Bros., paper, supplies 65.84 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper, supplies . . . 77.36 

Houghton Mifflin Co., pamphlets .... 2.17 

Paparcrafters, Inc., paper 7.62 

Wm. P. Proctor Co 1.93 

Sanderson's, cardholders 2.25 

Scott, Foresman & Co 4.83 

The Town Shop, netting 3.42 

Ward's, general files 5.71 

Henry S. Wolkins Co., paper 56.44 

World Book Co., tests 24.99 

$453.17 

High School Operating Expense 

Daniel MacDougall, Janitor $1,350.00 

713.02 



Fuel 




Miscellaneous : 




A. P. W. Paper Co., toilet tissue. . . 


$38.50 


Acton Motor Co., gas, oil 


3.22 


A. W. Davis Co., glass, bolts. 




cord, turpentine 


9.95 


American Brush Co., brushes 


17.35 


Boston Edison Co. 


365.57 


E. B. Brown, brushes 


3.28 


L. M. Glover Co., Inc., oiler 


9.09 


Maynard & Acton Oil Co., gas .... 


.88 


William Horner, soap, wax 


39.83 


N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 


82.13 



—162— 

Parker Hardware, bolts, screws, 

garbage can 5.37 

Wm. P. Proctor & Co., 

tool shed material 7.45 

Porter Cable Machine Corp., 

sand belts 7.09 

Standard Cotton Goods Co., 

cleaning cloths . 9.23 

Strong's Market, bon ami 1.40 

West Disinfecting Co., filpor 3.95 

West & South Water Supply District 36.41 

$640.70 

Total High School Operating Expense $2,703.72 

Elementary Operating Expense 

South West Center Total 

Janitors $722.00 $722.00 $640.00 $2,084.00 

Fuel 344.88 248.45 253.47 846.80 

Miscellaneous 

South West Center 

Boston Edison Co $59.91 $39.78 $25.32 

Wm. Horner, soap, oil, 

wax 12.75 12.71 12.71 

Am. Brush Co., brushes 4.05 4.06 4.05 
West & South Water 

Supply . 21.89 13.96 14.30 

Standard Cotton Goods 

Co., cloths 3.08 3.07 3.07 

West Disinfecting Co., 

filpor 1.33 1.31 1.31 

L. M. Glover Co., sprayer 3.03 3.03 3.03 
A. P. W. Paper Co., toilet 

tissue 12.84 12.83 12.83 

Geo. H. Reed, bucksaw, 

fertilizer . . , 6.05 



i 



i 



■163- 



J. S. Moore, shovel, pail, 

sprayer 3.27 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., 

nails, board 2.30 

Parker Hardware, sup- 
plies 2.64 

Sears, Roebuck Co., rope, 

hose 2.69 6.86 

Ralph Piper, lawn 8.00 

A. W. Davis Co., glass, 

salt, screws 5.75 

Strong's Market, spray- 
er, ammonia 2.28 

Ralph Rogers, lawn ... 5.00 



$143.33 $105.64 $81.62 $330.59 



Total Elementary Operating Expense. $3,261.39 

High School Maintenance and Repairs 

Allen Plumbing Supply Co., air valves $13.36 

A. W. Davis Co., window cord, glass. . 6.29 

Acton Piper Co., gas line 3.07 

Boston Typewriter Co., repairs 23.75 

Chandler & Barber, locks 13.51 

Division of Blind, piano tuning 3.50 

Irving S. Duren, painting 97.50 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc 2.56 

Arthur Freese 9.51 

Wilmot B. Cleaves, piano tuning 3.50 

Glenhili Bros. Inc., toilet seats 30.78 

Leonard Godfrey, upkeep of grounds. 28.00 

J. Gallant, refilling chemicals 1.50 

International Bus. Machines Corp., 

clock springs .62 

International Eng. Works, 

locker plates 2.04 

Maynard Machine Shop, lawn mower, 3.50 



—164— 

Mendelsohn's Hardware, keys, lock . . 8.00 

Parker Hardware, solder 1.69 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., state, screens . . . 24.98 
George Riff ord, hot water attachments, 

faucet 15.36 

Security Fence Co., window guards . . 14.60 

Albert E. Sims 8.28 

Typewriter Maintenance Co 9.25 

0. P. Tucker, door 19.20 

Frank L. Weaver & Son, roof 82.29 

West Disinfecting Co., filpor 22.85 

Benj. Sawyer 18.85 

Visual Education Service, projection 

lamp 5.87 

Yawman & Erbe, file 48.80 



Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 

South West Center 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., 

lumber $7.98 $18.44 $51.44 

Benj. Sawyer, fence, 

porch 53.50 12.50 36.80 

Leonard Godfrey 12.50 31.50 22.50 

Reformatory for Women, 

flags 8.09 8.08 8.08 

Heywood-Wakefield, 

chairs 4.58 4.56 4.56 

Div. of Blind, piano tun- 
ing 2.93 2.91 2.91 

J. Gallant, refill chemi- 
cals .50 .50 .50 

Benj. King, electrical 

work 32.00 18.50 

Albert Sims 14.15 3.00 

Parker Hardware, bolts, 
nuts , 8.44 12,67 



$523.01 



i 



—165- 



Vanderhoof Hardware, 

weatherstrip 

Seward Spinney, ceiling 
Astwood & Townsend, 

frames 

Geo. Braman, slate work 
H. J. Schnair, painting 
J. D. Smith, cement 

Wm. Holt 

G. Greeley, couch . . 
W. J. Scanlon, porch 
L. T. Fullonton, painting 
J. L. Hammett Co., bur- 
lap 

Chas. Waite, flue pipes . . 
Arvedon Elec. Supply. . 
Sears, Roebuck, lawn 

mower 

Irving Duren, remove 

ashes 

Arthur Freese 

R. T. Smith, cement. . . . 
Samuel Knowlton, binds 
Ralph Rogers, desks .... 
R. J. Rodday, weather- 
stripping 

Hay ward & Fullonton. . 



4.02 
4.00 

7.11 

9.00 

76.00 

47.00 

2.75 
5.00 



1.00 



13.50 

2.00 
468.00 

2.22 
1.50 



76.00 



3.30 

10.62 

8.00 

36.59 

13.00 

4.00 

8.00 

2.60 



$286.40 $598.36 $304.57 
Total Elementary Maintenance and Repairs $1,189.33 

Auxiliary Agencies 
Health: 

Middlesex Launderers & Cleaners . . $5.43 

Dr. Ernest Mayell, exams in high and 

elem. schools . 200.00 $205.43 



—166— 

Libraries : 

American Book Co .79 

Dura Binding Co 7.22 

Richard Greenman, papers for 

library 2.25 

Herman Goldberger Agency, 

magazines 33.30 

Young America 2.25 



Transportation : 

A. W. Davis Co 3,300.00 

Ormal Laffin 2,000.00 

Howard A. Wilson, legal services. . 15.00 

Dewick & Flanders, Inc., bond 112.50 



Vocational Education: 
City of Boston, 

tuition of F. Rahberg 225.00 

City of Waltham, 

tuition of J. Espie. 88.48 

Middlesex County, 

tuition of T. Mitchell 101.43 



Miscellaneous : 

Acton Monumental Co., 

engrave shield 2.00 

Allen's Dept. Store, diploma ribbons 5.40 

Boston & Maine R. R .85 

C. C. Cullinane, express 3.85 

H. V. Church, National Honor 

Society pins 16.00 

Com. of Public Safety, 

boiler inspection - 5.00 

Laffin's Express .70 

Murphy & Snyder, graduaton 

tickets and programs 8.25 



$45.81 



$5,427.50 



$414.91 



—167— 

Reynard's Express 8.40 

Shreve, Crump, & Lowe, 

engrave shield 1.00 

Tackneyi's Express .35 

Town Shop, graduation decorations .75 

Vannah Lithograph Co., diplomas. 38.15 



$90.70 



Total Expended $47,071.61 

Unexpended Balance 78.39 



$47,150.00 

Appropriation $47,000.00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund 150.00 



Report of the School Superintendent 



To the School Committee and Voters of Acton : 

I hereby submit my fifth annual report as Superintendent 
of Schools and high school principal. 

I. School Costs 

1. Per Capita Costs 

The net per capita cost of the 515 pupils enrolled in the 
Acton Schools on October 1, 1939, based upon the net esti- 
mated cost of $40,099.20, was $77.86 ; the corrected figure for 
1939 was higher, $80.05. The saving of $75.20 on trans- 
portation and other items was not sufficient to pay tuition bill 
of $397.40 for vocational education, the largest during the 
life of the present high school. Therefore, $150.00 additional 
was granted by the Finance Committee. 

To cover the needed repairs, provide the usual textbooks 
and supplies, and furnish reasonable increases in salaries, at 
least $47,000 should again be appropriated. 



—168— 

II. School Membership and Attendance 
1. Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1939 



Boys- 


— 














Age 














Grade 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


Totals 


1 


8 


14 


2 












• 












24 


2 


- 


5 


9 


1 






















15 


3 


- 


- 


7 


11 


3 




















21 


4 






- 


6 


15 


2 


















23 


5 








- 


5 


13 


6 


1 














25 


6 








- 


3 


4 


8 


2 


2 












19 


7 














1 


11 


3 2 












17 


8 
















1 


7 7 


2 










17 


9 


















7 13 


2 


1 








23 


10 


















6 


11 


3 


1 






21 


11 




















3 


7 


4 


1 




15 


12 






















1 


14 


3 


1 


19 . 


P. G. 




























2 


2 

241 


Girls- 


— 














Age 














Grade 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


Totals 


1 


7 


20 


- 


1 






















28 


2 


- 


7 11 


2 






















20 


3 




- 


11 


8 


1 


1 


















21 


4 






- 


8 


11 


- 


2 
















21 


5 








- 


5 


15 


4 


1 














25 


6 










- 


5 


16 


6 


1 












28 


7 














4 


11 


2 1 












18 


8 
















8 


10 4 


- 


1 








23 


9 
















1 


10 11 


9 










31 


10 


















1 5 


8 


4 


1 






19 


11 


















1 


3 


9 


4 






17 


12 






















4 


12 


5 




21 


P. G. 




















- 








2 


2 

274 



Total 515 



—169— 

This total enrollment of 515 was equalled once, in 1933, 
when there were 515 enrolled. The elementary schools (Grades 
1-6) increased 18 over 1938, the high school, as of January 1, 
1940, 3. This is due to the fact that more families with chil- 
ren have moved into Acton than have moved out. 

2. Percentage of Attendance 

From September 1938 through June 1939, the percentage 
of attendance for Grades 1-6 was 93.73; that for 1937-1938 
was 95.59. In Grades 7-12, it was 94.37 against 95.39, Tardi- 
ness remained exactly the same in the lower grades from 
September through December 1939, but increased from 44 
cases to 74 in the upper grades, particularly in Grades 10, 11, 
and 12, although this latter figure is not excessive. Only five 
house visits had to be made by Mr. Godfrey, the attendance of- 
ficer, for suspected truancy. There were four no-school days 
because of weather, two of which were due to the hurricane. 

The present bus arrangement has proven very satisfactory 
from the point of view of service and equipment. The larger 
busses have eliminated one trip from the South and West and 
accomodated more children. 

3. Teacher Loads (October 1, 1939) 

Grades 
1 and 2 
3 and 4 
5 and 6 

75 91 104 

The above figures mean an increase of 18 at the Center 
and a decrease of 2 at the West, and 2 at the South. We still 
have an additional teacher at the South School. 

4. Holding Power of High School and Employment 

Thirty-five of the fifty-one students (69%) who entered 
Grade 9 in September 1936 are in the present graduating 
class. This is the highest per cent for the school and is good 
for a rural community. Doubtless, an important reason for 



Center 


West 


South 


27 


29 


31 


18 


30 


38 


30 


32 


35 



—170— 

this average is lack of work for boys and girls between 16 and 
18 years of age. In this connection, the class which graduated 
in June 1939 has, at present, one attending college (Radcliffe), 
four business schools, one nursing training, one trade school; 
two are post-graduates, two work in factories, seven on farms 
and general work, two in business, two in domestic work, and 
six not gainfully employed. In other words, about 1/5, the 
same as for the class of 1938, are not continuing their formal 
education nor are gainfully employed. This means a far lower 
per cent of unemployment than obtans in urban communites. 

But our problem of continuing students in further educa- 
tion and of keeping them away from ''blind alley" jobs is still 
important. Much has been done in the study of vocations, col- 
lecting records, and counselling while students are still in 
school. Mr. Greenman and Mr. Hopkinson have devoted con- 
siderable time to this work. However, in a small system, where 
the teachers have a full teaching program, it is very difficult 
to follow-up our graduates and keep contacts with outside 
business for placement, especially in a town some distance 
from a city. 

As to entrance into college, the chief obstacle for an Acton 
student is lack of funds. Twelve of the present 41 seniors are 
enrolled in the college preparatory course, which may be used 
for college, nursing training schools, and the like, but probably 
only half of this number will continue formal education, large- 
ly because of the expense. The Acton High School Scholarship 
Fund, under the trusteeship of Mr. Howard Billings, the 
Chairman of the School Committee, and the Superintendent, 
on Jan. 1, 1940, amounted to $395.03. At least, $5,000 is need- 
ed for an annual income of $100.00. Last spring, over 140 let- 
ters requesting contributions were issued; $14.00 came in. 
Continued efforts will be made for this worthy cause. 

III. Health and Physical Education 

1. General 

A detailed account of regular physical examinations, and 
of testing and attention to eyes, teeth, home visits, etc., is 



__ 



—171— 

given in the reports of the school physician and school nurse. 

342 quarts of milk were furnished without cost, compared 
with 387 in 1938, 473^ in 1937, and 407 in 1936. All bills have 
been paid up to date. 

In regard to the Dental Clinic, the following financial 
statement for September through December 1939 is submit- 
ted — 97 pupils will receive attention. 

Receipts Expenditures 

Cash on Hand, Paid Dr. McNally. . . $150.00 

Sept. 1939 $13.85 (West School 41 cases) 

Faculty Play ...... 100.66 

Donations 33.50 Expected Expenditures 

Paid by Parents 93.63 Pay to Dr. McNally $224.25 

(West School 1 case 2.00) 

$241.64 (Center '' 30 cases 142.25) 
(South " 25 cases 80.00) 
Expected Receipts 
Due from Parents.. $132.61 



$374.25 $374.25 

The point to be emphasized is that this clinic is not free. 
Parents who can afford the work are expected to pay. This 
means that about % of the amount for free service in neces- 
sary cases is being raised annually; % must be paid by par- 
ents — Dr. McNally has visited the schools four times since 
the clinic was started in 1937, his work has been highly satis- 
factory and reasonable, and should be continued. 

2. Physical Education and Organized Athletics 

Physical education is carried on in grades 1-7 under the 
supervision of Miss Hanson and the grade school teachers. 
Organized teams occasionally play between the three ele- 
mentary schools and between grades. The underlying method 

to develop co-ordination, co-operation, strength, good posture, 
and desirable social and moral qualities is the use of games 
and wholesome competition. In addition, use is made of ani- 



—172— 



mal imitations, story plays, folk dances, charts, and mimetics. 
In grade 8-12, the girls are entirely under the supervison of 
Miss Hanson, but the boys are supervised by Mr. Dolan, Mr. 
Greenman, Mr. Holt, and Mr. Mitchell. This seems to be the 
only arrangement possible in order to make sure that every 
boy or girl, unless excused by doctor's certificate, receives 
physical education. In this connection, it should be stated that 
more and more attention is being given to hygiene and health 
habits through reading, films, class-room instruction, and visit- 
ing lecturers. 

In high school athletics, the girls played several schools 
in basketball and hockey and the boys in basketball, football, 
and baseball. Victories were few, but the interest continues 
strong, except in football, which Mr. Dolan and the Principal 
believe should be temporarily discontinued as a varsity sport. 
In general, at least 40 girls and 30 boys in grades 9-12 are 
materially benefited. No serious injuries ensued, which speaks 
well for training. As Mr. Dolan has indicated, ''our boys and 
girls continue to play cleanly, our officials are registered, the 
games have been conducted orderly, and our reputation among 
other schools is good." 

At this time, the Athletic Association wishes to thank Mr. 
Albert Jenks for providing athletic letters for 32 eligible boys 
and 22 eligible girls. 

The following Athletic Association financial statement for 
1939 shows less receipts and expenditures than in 1937 and 
1938 but presents a balanced budget. 



Receipts 
Cash on hand, 

Jan. 1, 1939 $61.64 



Expenditures 
Equipment $110.26 



Gate 

Dues 

Magazine Drive 
A. A. Dance . . . 

Gifts 

Movies ....... 



70.39 
97.43 
73.72 
21.69 
11.61 
15.25 



Transportation 

Officials 

Janitor 

Miscellaneous . 
Cash on hand, 
Jan. 1, 1940. 



84.00 
54.50 
13.50 
38.65 

50.82 



$351.73 



$351.73 



—173— 

From the above it is evident that athletics must still be 
heavily subsidized, because gate receipts netted only $70.39. 
The subsidy results from constant ''drives" and occasional 
financial aid from the school committee ($10.50 in 1939). 

3. Miscellaneous Activities 

Realizing the importance of certain activities in the educa- 
tional process, the school principals have co-operated well in 
directing a limited number for the students as v^ell as for the 
public. A few of these v^il be briefly mentioned. 

In the field of dramatics and public speaking, there v^ere 
several high school assemblies, at eight of which outside speak- 
ers furnished the programs. For Major Coulter's timely re- 
marks on democracy, Mr. James Kinsley's explanation of the 
workings of town government, and Rev. Mr. Wilde's Memor- 
ial Day address the students are duly grateful. Unfortunate- 
ly, the use of the auditorium for assemblies is limited because 
the room must be used also for physical education classes. The 
Senior Play, ''Cross My Heart'', coached by Mr. Greenman, re- 
ceived very favorable reception. The Teachers' Club, using 
eleven teachers and three seniors, presented the comedy, "Are 
You a Mason?" The Carlos B. Clark local history essays were 
well prepared and well delivered, but the public interest, if 
judged by slim attendances during the last two years, has made 
it seem advisable to declare a "moratorium" for a few years. 
On Exhibition Day, in the elementary schools, several simple 
but effective playlets were offered inside and outside the 
schools. Finally, a public speaking class in the high school has 
been organized under Miss Thompson and meets once each 
week. 

In further contacts with the public, the superintendent 
feels grateful to an earnest group of townspeople who helped 
organize a local Parent-Teacher Association. Already, three 
evening meetings and one afternoon meeting have been held, 
all well attended, under the active presidency of Mrs. Edward 
Schmitz. Programs are being planned for each of the remain- 
ing school months. The fact that over 100 parents joined the 



—174— 

organization within two months augurs well for the movement. 
On three other occasions, the 4-H Banquet, attended by 90 lead- 
ers from several towns, the reception tendered the five new 
teachers by the Acton Teachers' Club, and the annual school 
exhibition, all testify to the use of the high school by adult 
groups and the growth of public relations. For various forms 
of publicity considerable credit is due Miss Boornazian and 
the students in typewriting. 

4-H work has continued in one group in each of the ele- 
mentary schools and in two groups in the high school. In par- 
ticular, Mr. Braman has been requested to present a report of 
his group, the Agricultural Club. 

''We started the year w4th a study of vegetable, flower, 
and fruit diseases, accompanied by lectures by men from the 
Extension and Experimental Station Services. Three lectures 
by myself have been added on the care, handling, and exhibi- 
ton of poultry. 

''Starting January 3, 1940, we are to have eight meetings 
on landscape architecture and farm planning. Then we are to 
study vegetable and flower cultivation in the spring. 

"There are now seventeen boys in the club. Some of these 
are back for third-year study, which in itself shows a demand 
and need for this w^orthwhile study. 

"It is my ambition that in the future a full time course 
may be incorporated in our system." 

To assist the regular class-room instruction, all the stu- 
dents in the Biology classes attended the Horticultural Show, 
the members of the Agricultural Club visited two farms, the 
school paper staff attended a convention of school paper edi- 
tors, and the senior class visited the Art Museum and State 
House, observing both House and Senate in action. One visit- 
ing lecturer on health and one on art spoke to appropriate 
groups. Three students visited Framingham High School for 
all-day observation. The excellent educational film service fur- 
nished by Boston University has been maintained weekly. Our 



I 



-—175— 

school library, reorganized by Miss Stolte, continues to pro- 
vide opportunities to boys and girls living far from public 
libraries. The private fund established for aiding the library 
was $36.41 on January 1, 1940. $60.95 was spent during 1939 
for useful books. Incidentally, the public school appropriation 
for "libraries" is only $50.00, $40.00 of which must be used 
annually in the purchase of magazines. 

IV. Teacher Personnel 

Five changes occurred in the teaching personnel, four in 
the high school and one in the elementary schools, during 1939. 
Four teachers resigned because of more attractive offers in 
other schools and one to be married. In the high school. Miss 
Elinor Brown of Leicester succeeded Miss Stolte, Miss Eleanor 
Thompson of Webster Miss Billman, Miss Rebecca Bartlett of 
Worcester Miss Leavitt, and Mr. John Mitchell of Worcester 
Mr. George Braman, Miss Alice Feehan of Acton was advanced 
from special to regular teacher to fill Miss Dickerman's place. 
The school authorities regret the resignations of teachers who 
served long and well. Reasonable increases in salaries should 
be made periodically for service and merit. The new teachers 
are all college graduates, with excellent college records, and, 
despite lack of experience, have done satisfactory work. Regu- 
lar monthly faculty meetings continue for professional discus- 
sion and improvement. This year we have begun a long study 
of curriculum revision, so much needed in Acton. Weak spots 
noted in the achievement tests given in 1938 have been 
strengthened. General achievement tests will be given again in 
1940. 

There follow the reports of the work in Domestic and 
Manual Arts, Drawing, and Music. The report of the school 
physician and school nurse are printed separately. 

V. Domestic Arts 

The work in this department is planned to make better 
home citizens, and consequently, better community citizens of 
the girls. 



—176— 

Grade 7 — -Clothing: 2 periods weekly. 

Skill in simple stitches and construction of gar- 
ments. 

Grade 8 — Foods : 4 periods weekly. 

Skill in cooking simple dishes. 

Knowledge of bodily requirements and how 

these may be satisfied in daily diet. 

Grade 9 — (1st semester) Social living and personal 
grooming: 3 periods weekly. 
(2nd semester) Clothing care, repair, and se- 
lection: 3 periods weekly. 
Knowledge of fabrics and their manufacture. 

Grades 10, 11, and 12 — Home making: 5 periods weekly. 
Knowledge of child care; home nursing; care 
and selection of home equipment; nutrition; 
and budgeting. 

Attitudes toward other members of family, 
home, and community. 

Grades 11 and 12 — Lunch Room: 5 periods weekly. 
Skill in working in kitchen. 
Knowledge of menu making and food buying. 
Ability to plan working period in order to 
have meal properly prepared. 

Lunch Room Report 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1939 $30.16 

Total sales for 1939 2,026.77 

Total expenses for 1939 $2,050.48 

Cash on hand, Jan. 1, 1940 6.45 

i 

$2,056.93 $2,056.93 

Compared with 1938, there was a cash balance for 1939 
of $23.74 less than in 1938, but there was $28.43 less cash on 
hand to start with. An interesting item is $81.82 more sales in 
1939 than in 1938, or $304.68 more than in 1937. If costs of 
common articles of food continue to rise, prices must naturally 



—Ill- 
he raised to prevent a deficit. There is need of more plates and 
other articles for daily service; for this purchase the small 
balance is not suffcient. 

VI. Manual Arts 

So much interest has developed in manual arts since Sep- 
tember that it seems advisable to present Mr. Mitchellfs report 
verbatim. 

''According to a recent federal government bulletin, In- 
dustrial Arts in the junior and senior high schools is that part 
of general education which (a) provides boys and girls vv^ith 
information regarding industry and workers; (b) reveals em- 
ployment opportunities offered by industry; (c) satisfies the 
student's desire to create useful things; (d) develops hobby 
and handy man interests and abilities; (e) contributes to the 
tastes and judgment of the prospective consumer; (f) devel- 
ops interest and ability in home repairs and maintenance; (g) 
gives opportunity for co-operative effort in groups; and (h) 
illustrates and vitalizes the academic subjects." 

''To establish these aims, the Industrial Arts Department 
of the high school has inaugurated several new changes in its 
set-up. Briefly, the outline of the courses being attempted is 
as follows : 

Grade 7: Fundamentals of woodworking, a knowledge 
tools, woods, and materials. 

Grade 8: A combination of woodwork and elementary 
sheetmetal work together with their related 
studies. 

Grade 9: (Elective) Home Mechanics — a course de- 
signed to acquaint boys with types of jobs and 
duties performed around the home. 
Mechanical Drawing — the study and making 
of working drawings, fundamental to all in- 
dustrial arts courses. 



-178— 



Grade 10: (Elective) General Shop — a multi-activities 
shop in which advanced v^oodv^ork, bench 
metal work (wrought iron work) , and ele- 
mentary electricity will be conducted at the 
same time. 

Machine Drawing — the study and drawing of 
machine parts. 

Grade 11: (Elective) General Shop — advanced wood- 
work (use of machines), metal work (bench 
metal, forging and casting; sheetmetal, and 
artmetal) woodfinishing. 

Architectural Drawing I — fundamentals of 
architecture, the laying out of simple house 
plans. 

Grade 12: (Elective) General Shop — machine wood- 
working and cabinetmaking ; artmetal work; 
ceramics, Keene's cement, and plastics; ma- 
chine lathe work. 

Architectural Drawing II — (prerequisite, 
Arch. Drawing I) Development of house plans, 
etc. 

*'In order to carry on all these activities, it was necessary 
to reorganize the whole shop. Through the help of students and 
instructor this was done, new benches were installed, some 
new equipment was purchased, and the rearrangement of the 
shop layout was effected. Now it is possible to accommodate, 
in the general shop scheme, as high as 15 to 20 boys in these 
varied activities and their related studies. 

''It must be borne in mind, however, that the aim of the 
Industrial Arts department is not to make skilled w^orkmen, — 
the trade school does that, — but merely to give the students an 
opportunity to explore and discover their interests or apti- 
tudes in the industrial field.' 



—179— 

VII. Drawing 
Mr. Frank Braman writes as follows in regard to his 
drawing work : 

''This year the art in Grades 1 through 6 has been most 
gratifying, in that those grades have covered more subject 
matter than ever before. These students in the lower grades 
have made an extensive study of our native bird life, their 
habits and colors; and, in Grades 5 and 6, their relation to 
agriculture. More group drawings have been produced. The 
research accompanying these has been very beneficial. Several 
of these large drawings were evident at the exhibition. More 
attention has been given to lettering than in other years. The 
result in learning letter shapes and taking directions is becom- 
ing evident. 

"Grades 7 and 8 have been kept largely to a study of com- 
position and balance that was much needed by these groups, 
with an added touch of mechanical drawing in Grade 8. 

''With few exceptions. Grade 9 boys elected to take me- 
chanical drawing. I am trying to work in as much shop work 
drawing as possible. 

"High school students of free hand drawing have received 
review work in lettering, color composition, design, balance, 
and perspective. Advance work in a few cases has been suc- 
cessful among the Grade 10 and 11 people, and particularly 
successful in Grade 12 and post graduate years." 

VIII. Music 

a. Vocal 

As stated last year, the outlook in music under Mr. Moran 
is much brighter than before and continues to show slow but 
steady improvement. A carefully graded system has been 
worked out for the first six grades, extending from rote-sing- 
ing, matching tones, etc. in Grades 1 and 2 to three-part sing- 
ing in Grade 6. In Grades 7 and 8 preparation is made particu- 
larly for the high school glee clubs and choral singing, but Mr. 
Moran finds difficulty in the changing voices of the boys and 



—180— 

the limited time granted for the work. 

The course in Music Appreciation, required of all students 
in Grade 9, ''covers a brief history of the development of mu- 
sic, analysis of form, acquaintance with a large number of 
standard recordings, theory, and brief biographies of im- 
portant musicians". It has not been easy to develop this course 
satisfactorily, but progress has been made. 

Publicly, the most ambitious work ever attempted, the 
operetta entitled ''The Sun-Bonnet Girl", was presented be- 
fore a crowded audience in the high school last spring. It was 
pronounced a decided success. Over 60 boys and girls par- 
ticipated, requiring an extension of the stage. This addition 
was constructed, without labor cost, by Norman Garthe of the 
Class of 1939, his father, and brother, in such a manner that 
it can be detached and used again in the future. On several 
other occasions, the glee clubs performed before the townspeo- 
ple, and in the coming spring, they expect to present a con- 
cert and engage in a state contest with other schools. 

b. Instrumental 

The usual struggle to develop an orchestra continued, due 
to lack of instruction before Grade 7 and to a sufficient num- 
ber of students who have taken lessons regularly. Acton is 
particularly handicapped in this regard. Our chief reliance 
seems to be upon boys and girls, better trained in instrumental 
music, who move in from other localities. 

The high school still needs a smaller, upright piano, rath- 
er than the present large grand, which ocupies too much space 
and is in poor condition. 

c. Youth Concerts 

Through the continued efforts of. Mr. Greenman 19 stu- | 
dents attended six Boston Symphony Youth Concerts in 1938- 
1939. Eighteen students are attending the concerts this year. 
This is a wonderful opportunity for boys and girls to hear the 
best of music at very reasonable prices. It is strongly hoped 



—181— 

that more help can come from the parents for transportation, 
for this is our most serious problem. 

Conclusion 

The schools have all been well-heated and comfortable, am- 
ple working material has been provided, and pupils like to at- 
tend. Relationships betwen parents, teachers, and pupils have 
been pleasant. For their part in helping to create this situation, 
the superintendent wishes to thank the school committee, 
townspeople, and members of the school staff. 

Respectfully yours, 

WALTER F. HALL, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



—182- 



Report of the School Physician 



Walter F. Hall 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir : 

I herewith submit my annual report as school physician. 

The yearly physical examination of all the pupils in our 
schools was finished in October. Examinations of all pupils 
taking part in sports were made prior to the regular yearly 
physicial examinations in the high school. 

Details of the examinations may be found in the nurse's 
report. 

In October there were two cases of scarlet fever in the 
West School, but with prompt isolation and quarantine we were 
fortunate in not having more cases develop. 

In November there were some cases of measles in North 
Acton, but by isolating the contacts we were able to keep the 
disease out of the schools. 

The pre-school clinics were held in June and the immuniz- 
ation clinics for diphtheria were held in May. 

On the whole, we had a very healthful year, and I wish 
to thank the superintendent, teachers, nurse, and townspeople 
for their co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



—183- 



Report of the School Nurse 



Mr. Walter F. Hall 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report as school nurse for the year 
ending December 31, 1939. The physical examinations of all 
school children were made early in the fall by Doctor E. May ell, 
our school physician. Examinations are made as early in the 
school year as possible so that a childj's physical condition may 
be known to parent, teacher, and nurse, and any adjustments 
or corrections favorable to pupil may be made. High school 
students who sign up for competitive sports are given a thor- 
ough examination with particular attention given to condition 
of the heart. The following list tells the story of defects found 
by physician in his examinations: 

Number of pupils examined 512 

Heart irregularities 34 

Teeth (dental decay) 175 

Enlarged tonsils 48 

Malnutrition 23 

Skin eruptions 8 

Faulty posture 35 

Posture defects were properly referred to the teacher of 
physical education for helpful advice. The number of children 
needing dental care has always been a major problem. In some 
cases dental work has been done, in others none for some time. 
This condition has shown great improvement since our school 
dental clinic was started three years ago. In three years the 
clinic, which usually runs for just a few months in the fall, has 
examined and treated 255 children. In all but a few cases all 
necessary work was completed and the State Department 



—184— 

Health Dental Certificate given. Some of these eases were re- 
peaters, coming to the clinic annually to have v^ork done. 
Through the Red Cross v^e have been able to buy tooth brushes 
which are sold at reduced prices to children. When the clinic 
finishes at South School about 97 children in Acton will have 
received dental care. 

The Board of Health and the school physician have con- 
ducted every year a program for diphtheria prevention. It con- 
sists of a Schick test, and, if the test is a positive one, three 
doses of toxoid are given at weekly intervals. The Schick test 
was given at parents' request, to 96 school and 34 pre-school 
children. Of this group 41 showed a positive test and received 
toxoid injections. This clinic is open to pre-school groups, who 
are most in need of diphtheria protection by immunization. 

The school clinic formerly called the Chadwick Clinic was 
not held their year. The present plan of Middlesex County Hos- 
pital calls for a clinic to be held in each high school every three 
or four years. It thus gives students of all classes an oppor- 
tunity to be examined once during their high school course. 

We are fortunate to have had very little communicable dis-- 
ease in school the past year. There were 12 reported cases, all 
in elementary schools. 

At the pre-school conference held in June, 30 pupils came 
for an examination by the school physician. Then the parents 
had an opportunity to have conferences with first grade teach- 
ers. 

Our community benefited through the sale of Christmas 
seals in this way. Three pupils had removal of tonsils ; one boy 
went to Prendergast Preventorium for four weeks; and help 
was given to milk and dental clinic programs. Mrs. Thelma 
Blood is our local chairman for the Southwestern Middlesex 
Health Association. This association runs our local "Health 
Camp Virginia", which cared for girls only this summer. 

Routine work was carried on in schools, daily visits made 
when possible, and absent pupils visited in the home. All 



—185— 

pupils had a vision test, and a re-test if necessary. 

Number of pupil inspections 1,376 

First aid and simple dressings 409 

Pupils taken home ill 20 

Pupils taken to oculist 12 

Pupils taken to physician 14 

Number of home visits 206 

I wish to express my appreciation to you and to the teach- 
ers for your support in this school health program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. GREELEY, R. N. 



Graduates of 1939 



**John Henry Anderson 
Walter Alad Anderson 
Eleanor Deana Brackett 

**Helen Buckley 
Leon Nathan Glaflin 
*Robert Edward Clapp 
Frederick Stuart Gonquest 
Dorothy Dyer Goulter 
Mary Cullinane 
Sonya Farley 
Norman Garthe 
George Bernard Gilbert 
David Lester Jenks 

**Barbara Ethelyn Jensen 



Mary Arlene Jones 
Donald Wallace MacDougall 
James Herbert Nelson 
Robert Edwin Newsham 
Irving Lundberg Opsahl 
Richard James Pedersen 
Helen Pederson 
George Wilson Robinson 
Janet Doris Spinney 
** Nancy Starbuck 
*Joseph Leonard Walther 
Gloria Irene Wamboldt 
Kenneth Lee Webb 
Robert Ernest Weymouth 



* Honor Students 
** Honor Students and members of National Honor Society 



—186— 

Student Essays : 

First honors : John H. Anderson — "A Small School Should 
Attempt Vocational Education" 

Second honors: Barbara E. Jensen — **A Small School 
Should Not Attempt Vocational Education" 

Nancy Starbuck : "We Make Our Own Way" 

Awards During Year : 

Robert E. Clapp, Carlos B. Clark Acton History Award, 
First prize; Norman Garthe, Carlos B. Clark Acton His- 
tory Award, Second prize; Nancy Starbuck, Carlos B. 
Clark Acton History Award, Honorable Mention. Helen 
Pederson and Robert E. Clapp, American Legion Award 
for best rank in Scholarship, Loyalty, and Achievement 
(Edward-Quimby Post). 

John Anderson: Washington-Franklin Medal for best rec- 
ord in American History (Mass. Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution). 



I 



i 



—191— 

INDEX 

Warrant, Monday, March 4, 1940 3 

Town Officers 9 

Selectmen's Report 14 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 13, 1939 15 

Special Town Meeting (Abstract), Dec. 18, 1939 24 

Town Clerk's Report 25 

Births 26 

Marriages 28 

Deaths 33 

Non-Resident Burials 34 

Dog Licenses 36 

Jury List (Revised) 1939 40 

Cemetery Commissioners 41 

W.P.A. Work Relief 43 

Superintendent of Streets 44 

Tree Warden 45 

Moth Control 46 

Assessors 47 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 48 

Middlesex County Extension Service 49 

Sponsor, W.P.A. Projects 50 

Sealer's Report 51 

Police 52 

Librarian's Report 60 

Books Added to Public Library 60 

Inspector of Animals 73 

Elizabeth White Fund 73 

Dog Officer 74 

Town Nurse 75 

Board of Health 76 

Tax Collector 78 

Superintendent of Town Forests 82 

Forest Warden 83 

Fire Department 84 

Public Welfare 85 

Old Age Assistance 86 



—192— 

INDEX (Continued) 

Aid to Dependent Children 87 

Welfare 87 

Report of Finance Committee 88 

Treasurer's Report 90 

Town Accountant 103 

Balance Sheet, 1939 139 

Schools : 

Organization , 147 

Teachers 150 

School Committee 151 

Budget for 1940 154 

Summary of Expenses, 1939 155 

Superintendent 167 

School Physician 182 

School Nurse 183 

Graduates, 1939 185 



AJNNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 







FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1940 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 







FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1940 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS. Inc. 
Plymouth, Mass. 



— 3- 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings foi^ the transaction 
of town affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, thq third day of March, 1941, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least 
before the third day of March. ' > 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following 
town officers: Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, col- 
lector of taxes, one selectman for three years; one assessor 
for three years; one member of the board of public welfajre 
for three years; four constables for one year; one cemetery 
commissioner for three years; two members of the school 
committee for three vears; one member of the board of health 
for three years; one trustee Memorial Library for three years, 
and a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 8 
o'clock p .m. 

You are further requested m the name of the Common- 
wealth to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, as 



— 4— 

aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton, on Monday, 
the tenth day of March, at 7:30 o'clock p.m., then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual ex- 
penses of the several departments of the town and determine 
how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire depart- 
ment, or vote anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush 
fires and fix a price thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to insure the employees of the town or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate for the payment of premiums 
on all town officers' bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow" 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1941, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 



— 5— 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse, and raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
maintenance of same. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $800.00 or any other sum to purchase 
new fire hose. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase new forest fire hose or* act 
anything thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, aS required by 
law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, 
and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as 
assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of 
the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addi- 
tion thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G (6) (a) 
of the Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00 for the maintenance of Jones Com- 
munity Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,200 or any other sum for the suppression 
of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the care of shade trees oi^ act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of two hundred ($200) dollars or any other sum 
to be used by the Town Forest Committee for the purpose of 
purchasing additional forest land or act anything thereon. 



Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) for the redemp- 
tion of tax titles held by the town. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills for 
1940, or do or act anything thereon. 

General Government $46.00 

Board of Health 26.25 

Fire Department 6.43 

— $78.68 

Also 1939 unpaid bills — General Government $20.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $230.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reim- 
bursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or 
act any thing thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to paint the Town Hall or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase settees for the Town Hall 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase a plot of, land and erect a 
building thereon for the use of the highway department or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase a new power road grader 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if -the town will vote td authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to appoint an additional full time police 
officer or act anything thereon. 



— 7— 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to continue the improvement of Maiin 
Street, from the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton; 
said money to be used in conjunction with any money which 
may be allotted by the State or County, of both, for this pur- 
pose; or take any other action in relation thereto: 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to repair and widen Msl^in Street from 
Route No. 2 to the Maynard line; said money to be used in con- 
junction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any other action in 
relation thereto. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the specific repairs and widenings 
of School Street, South Acton„ said money to be used in con- 
junction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to transfer $1,000 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,205 to complete the fire alarm system or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase and install directional and 
street signs or act anything thereon. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of three hundred ($300) dollars or any other 
sum to be used for pruning damaged trees in the cemeteries 
of the town or act anything thereon. 

Article 35. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to changing the name of School Street, West Acton, to 
Gates Road or any other suitable name, or act anything thereon. 



— 8— 

Article 36. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate $19,500 for the building of two wings at the rear of the 
present high school, in order to provide locker and shower 
rooms, drawing room, new typewriting room, new nurse's 
room, and all necessary original equipment, and to make neces- 
sary alterations in the present building to provide for a larger 
mechanics arts department, and to meet said appropriation the 
sum of $3,500 shall be raised in the tax levy of the current 
year, $2,500 of said amount being for remodehng or changing 
the present building, and the treasurer with the selectmen be 
and hereby is authorized to borrow $16,000 and issue bonds or 
notes of the town therefor according to the provisons of Chap- 
ter 44, General Laws. Said bonds or notes shall be due and 
payable in not more than sixteen years. The amount appro- 
priated shall be expended under the direction of the Special 
Committee appointed by the moderator in 1940 and School 
Committee; pass any votes or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the erection of guide posts and 
boards at intersections of School and River Streets; School 
Street and Laws Brook Road; and School Street and Route No. 
Ill or take any action thereon. 

Article 38. To see if the town will rescind the vote passed 
at their meeting, March 30, 1914, whereby they voted to accept 
the provisions of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of 1907 
relative to the election of a highway surveyor, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 39. To see if the town will vote to hereafter elect 
a highway surveyor by ballot, as provided for in Chapter 41, 
Section 1, of the General Laws of 1921. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time of 
said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 



— 9— 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the time of 
meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this fifth day of February, 
1941. 

RALPH W. PIPER 

W. BURTON HARVEY 

JAMES E. KINSLEY 

Selectmen of Acton 

A true copy. Attest: 

MICHAEL FOLEY 

Constable of Acton 



-10— 



Report of Finance Committee 



Your committee on Finance respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing recommendations for the ensuing year. 

General Government $7,000.00 

Bonds Article No. 9 251.50 

Building and Grounds 1,500.00 

Police Dept 4,200.00 

If Article No. 27 Accepted, otherwise $2,500.00 

Fire Dept., Article No. 6 2,800.00 

Forest Fire, Article No. 7 500.00 

Fire Alarm System